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Posts under tag: Nathalie Hester

December 13, 2018

Prof. Nathalie Hester Awarded NEH Research Fellowship

Nathalie Hester, Associate Professor of French and Italian, has been awarded a prestigious and highly selective National Endowment for the Humanities Research Fellowship for her in-progress book project, Inventing America in Baroque Italy: Columbus, Vespucci, and New World Epic. 

Inventing America in Baroque Italyexamines the ways in which, at a time when most of the Italian peninsula was a colony of Spain, seventeenth-century Italian poets represent Italy’s role in the exploration and conquest of the Americas.  Taking as its corpus eleven epic poems written in the Italian vernacular between 1596 and 1650, Hester’s bookconsiders the relationship between baroque epic poetry and local politics; between Italian poems about the Americas and Spanish colonialism; and between literary production and emerging notions of Italian identity.  A principal argument of this study is that the heated debates about representing Columbus and Vespucci as epic heroes inevitably point to concerns about Europe’s global expansion and Italy’s role in that expansion. This project sheds light on texts that have not received adequate attention in studies of early modern European colonialism and in scholarship on the reception of the Americas in seventeenth-century Italy.

Congratulations, Dr. Hester!

March 16, 2018

Hester publishes article on baroque poetry about Christopher Columbus

This essay examines Girolamo Graziani’s well-received epic poem, Il Conquisto di Granata (The Conquest of Granada, 1650), as a compelling piece of an Italian genealogy of New World Italian epic poetry, to which corpus the Conquisto belongs, despite its title. Indeed, in a convenient reworking of the historical timeline, the Columbus of this work returns to Spain from his first voyage to the Americas in time to fight the Moors of Granada, and he plays a decisive role in their defeat. The poetic project of the Conquisto incorporates three main aims: to address and remedy criticisms leveled against earlier Italian epic poetry about the New World, to establish Columbus as the narrative and ideological link between Conquest and Reconquest and, more broadly, to maintain the international status of Italian letters at a time when deeds and facts—expansion, colonialism—come to define the prestige of European proto-nations.

Hester, Nathalie. “Baroque Italian Epic from Granada to the New World: Columbus Conquers the Moors.” The Discovery of the New World in Early Modern Italy: Encounters with the Americas in the 16th-18th Centuries. Eds. Elizabeth Horodowich and Lia Markey. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2017. 270-287.

December 1, 2015

Global Perspectives on the November 13 Terrorist Attacks in Paris

Our Department Co-sponsored an open discussion on global terror networks, imperialism, states of exception and increased militarization with a selected group of experts and a lively participation from the public.

image image image image imageThursday, December 3, EMU Ballroom, 12-2pm

Speakers: Cory Browning (RL), Angela Joya (IS), Matthias Mathijs (IS, Johns Hopkins), Fabienne Moore (RL), Sebastián Urioste (RL), Anita Weiss (International Studies).

Here is what some Romance Languages students had to say about the event:

“The panel discussion of the terrorist attacks in Paris was a well-planned and a thoughtful event. The professors […] that were giving their lectures brought up some well thought-out insights that I did not know or even realize were being taken into factor when discussing the terror attacks in Paris.”
Moriah Frazier

“I found the discussion to be a great learning experience and I hope I can attend more events like this in the future.”
Abby Hauth

“It was refreshing to be able to get the perspectives of people who weren’t the media and weren’t overly biased in their comments.”
Meaghan Donovan

“After hearing everything people had to say in this seminar I believe our best weapon against incidents like this is education. […] People need to be able to see the humanity of the situation in the world and examine it so that they can come to an educated conclusion.”
Hank Manilla

And Romance Languages Professor Leah Middlebrook wrote:

“The discussion was powerful and moving, and the audience engagement and response demonstrates how much we need these types of events right now […] The thoughtful conversation that took place in the second half of the program did much to counteract the sense of helplessness and frustration that has been building over the past months.”

Sponsored by the Program in European Studies, the Department of Romance Languages, the Department of International Studies, and UO International AffairsParis

February 12, 2014

Armchair Travel from Italy to the “New World”

Dr. Nathalie Hester presents Armchair Travel from Italy to the “New World”

This unique event brought to you by the Oregon Rare Books Initiative (ORBI).  The talk will be held on Wednesday March 5th at 4:45 in the Paulson Reading Room in the Knight Library.

ORBI is a new research and interest group promoting the study of the history of the book at UO. For more information visit blogs.uoregon.edu/orbi/.

Hester-ArmchairTravel



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