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Posts under tag: Sergio Rigoletto

May 21, 2018

Thinking Authenticity Series: Noa Steimatsky

Please join us for the final lecture of the ‘Thinking Authenticity’
Speaking Series

Noa Steimatsky (Berkeley/ACLS)

‘The Face on Film: Made and Unmade’

Wed May 23
3-5pm  Willamette 100

Noa Steimatsky is Fellow of the American Council of Learned Society and  Visiting Associate Professor of Italian at UC Berkeley. Exploring the ways in which the facial close-up has often been described in film criticism as a moment of truth within the cinematic image, the lecture will show that the face is much more than the quintessential incarnation of the person and that our encounter with its representation is also predicated on a sense of ambiguity and illegibility.

Click here to see the event on Facebook.

A Great Visit by Frieda Ekotto

On May 15th and 16th, U Michigan Professor Frieda Ekotto visited the UO and gave a talk titled “Reading Aimé Césaire in the Era of Black Lives Matter” as part of the RL Spring Series “Thinking Authenticity.”

Professor Ekotto generously gave us a copy of her latest project, a 90 min. documentary film Vibrancy of Silence: A Discussion with My Sisters, produced and filmed by Professor Ekotto and Marthe Djilo Kamga, which highlights the creative achievements of six Sub-Saharan African women in various intellectual and artistic fields (in French with English subtitles).

Stay tuned for a screening in the fall!

October 30, 2017

“Queering Internal Exile on Italian Screen” a Public Lecture by Prof. Dana Renga

On Thursday Nov. 16th Prof. Renga (Chair of Italian and French at Ohio State University) will give a lecture on the forced exile of several homosexual inmates during fascism as represented and memorialized in a number of Italian documentaries and fiction films.

Gerlinger Lounge
Nov. 16th (5pm)

In 2003, multi-term ex-prime minister of Italy Silvio Berlusconi stated: ‘I understand the difficulties of teaching democracy to a people who for nearly forty years have known only dictatorship.’ Interviewer Nicholas Farrell prompted: ‘Like Italy at the fall of Fascism.’ To this, Berlusconi infamously declared ‘That was a much more benign dictatorship; Mussolini did not murder anyone. Mussolini sent people on holidays to confine them to banishment to small islands such as Ponza or Maddalena which are now exclusive resorts.’ The promotion of internal exile (‘confino’) as holiday is particularly interesting when considering the experience of men sent to the islands for suspicion of ‘pederasty’ (as it was referred to at the time). As this talk discusses, gay men found a certain amount of freedom on an island prison where conditions were grim, barracks were overcrowded, illness was rampant, jobs were unavailable, and the average stipend was only four lire per day. At the same time, the experience of gay men sent into internal exile is cloaked in silence. The lecture interrogates this silence by looking at two feature films, three documentaries, and a graphic novel that treat, to different degrees, the experiences of gay men sent into internal exile.

 

 

October 22, 2017

Prof. Rigoletto publishes an essay on queer visibility in contemporary Italian documentaries

Prof. Sergio Rigoletto has published an essay titled ‘Against the Telelological Preseumption: Notes on Queer Visibility in Contemporary Italian Film’ in The Italianist 37: 2, 2017. The essay is concerned with some of the problems involved in the task of narrating the queer self. At a time in which positive queer representations have become increasingly common in Italian cinema and other media, it is worth asking what conditions underpin the present regime of queer visibility and what alternative queer experiences have been either obscured or marginalized. The first half of the essay explores the recent popularity of the coming out narrative in the Italian context. The essay asks what epistemological assumptions underlie the metaphor of coming out and how such assumptions have come to affect the terms under which queerness appears now visible in Italian cinema and other media. The second section of the essay focuses on several recent Italian documentaries including La bocca del lupo (Marcello: 2009), Felice chi è diverso (Amelio: 2013) and Le coccinelle. Sceneggiata transessuale (Pirelli: 2011). The essay shows the complex ways in which these films deploy their dissident strategies of queer self-revelation and configurations of social legibility.

 

Le coccinelle. Transsexual Melodrama  (Pirelli: 2011)

March 7, 2014

Special screening of ‘The Great Beauty’- 2014 Academy Award

The UO Italian Program presents a special screening of ‘La Grande Bellezza‘, un film di Paolo Sorrentino.  Winner of the 2014 Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film!

Tuesday March 11th, 2014
7:00pm
Bijou Art Cinemas (492 East 13th Avenue, Downtown Eugene)

The film will be introduced by Sergio Rigoletto, UO professor of Italian/Cinema Studies.

Bellezza

March 24, 2013

Rigoletto publishes book of essays on Popular Italian Cinema

Assistant Professor of Italian and Cinema Studies Sergio Rigoletto has published a co-edited volume entitled Popular Italian Cinema (Palgrave Macmillan). The collection includes two essays by Prof. Rigoletto: “The Fair and the Museum: Framing the Popular’ (co-written with L. Bayman) [Open Access Postprint] and  “Laughter and the Popular in Lina Wertmüller’s The Seduction of Mimì” [Open Access Postprint].

‘This volume really does represent a shift in thinking on Italian cinema, and the many fine, young scholars who contribute to this book show the direction that future criticism of Italian film will take. It is a valuable contribution to cinema studies on many levels, and I was delighted to have read it.’

– Peter Bondanella, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Comparative Literature, Film Studies and Italian, Indiana University, USA

Prof. Rigoletto has also published an essay, “Contesting National Memory: Masculine Dilemmas and Oedipal Scenarios in Bernardo Bertolucci’s Strategia del ragno and Il conformist” [Ingenta] [Open Access] in Italian Studies. The essay is a reading of the theme of the oedipal conflict between father and son in these two films as an exploration of the problematic relation between Italy’s post-1968 and its fascist past.

 

January 17, 2013

‘CINEMATHEQUE’- Free Film Series for Faculty and Graduate Students

Cinema Studies presents The Cinematheque, a new cinema scholars club.  Films are shown Tuesday evenings at 6:30pm in the Mills International Center.  The first film screening takes place on Tuesday January 29th: Dans Paris (Dir. Chirstophe, 2007, 90 min).

All film screenings are free for faculty and graduate students.

Cinematique Flier



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