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June 10, 2019

UO Language Students earn Global Seal of Biliteracy

[see the corresponding article in the Register-Guard]

The University of Oregon has awarded 210 language students with the Global Seal of Biliteracy in French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese and Spanish in an inaugural program. Recipients tested to qualify for the new Global Seal of Biliteracy and can use the language credential to document their skills for jobs and study abroad opportunities.

The Yamada Language Center event was attended by awardees, university language professors, Sheila Bong of Avant Assessment, and Global Seal of Biliteracy representative, Hunter Sudek.

Students earned either the Functional Fluency or Working Fluency Global Seal of Biliteracy award by taking the STAMP 4S test, whichwas created at the University of Oregon’s Center for Applied Second Language Studies (CASLS).

Awardees will be well prepared, according to a recently released survey of 1,200 upper-level managers and human resources professionals conducted by Ipsos Public Affairs.  “Making Languages Our Business: Addressing Foreign Language Demand Among U.S. Employers,”found that 9 out of 10 US employers rely on U.S. based employees with language skills other than English and that a majority of employers report that their need for foreign languages has increased over the past five years and project that it will continue to grow.

May 28, 2019

Millar Publishes Translation of Angolan Poet

 Lanie Millar, Assistant Professor of Spanish and Portuguese, has published a Spanish translation of the poem “Monangamba” by Angolan poet António Jacinto. The translation appears in the journal CAL: Revista de poesía (Huelva, Spain) in a special issue on Portuguese-language poetry, co-edited by former RL graduate student Rafael Núñez Rodríguez. António Jacinto (1924-1991) was one of Angola’s most important poets of the independence generation. He co-founded the Angolan Writers’ Union in 1975, and served as Minister of Culture from 1975-1978. He was awarded Angola’s National Prize for Literature in 1987.

February 6, 2019

Prof. Millar Publishes Article on Cuban and Angolan Poetry

Lanie Millar, Assistant Professor of Spanish and Portuguese, has published an article titled “Luanda in Santiago and Santiago in Luanda: Trans-Atlantic Dimensions in Cuban and Angolan Poetry” in the most recent issue of  MLN (vol. 133, no. 5, December, 2018, pp. 1277-1303). The article examines how several groups of twentieth-century Cuban and Angolan poems portray trans-Atlantic exchange between the Caribbean and Africa. It analyzes both mid-twentieth-century anti-colonial poems as well as late-twentieth-century poems written about Cuba’s support for the leftist party during Angola’s civil war, focusing on works by Cubans Nicolás Guillén, Antonio Conte, and Víctor Casaus and Angolans Agostinho Neto, Viriato da Cruz, and Manuel Rui. The poems are often considered only in their limited service to particular political messages. However, Millar argues that poetic nuances often remain hidden or unnoticed if we ignore the poetic in overtly political poetry. The article shows that these poems conceive of a more complex and nuanced idea of the Atlantic world than the simple notion of Africa as the sole origin of cultural inspiration for communities formed through slavery and colonization, which poets in the Americas imitate or copy.  As a result, the article argues, considering these groups of poems together reveals something much more complex than facile political messaging: an alternative social and political community that stretches between the Caribbean and Africa, founded on networks of readers and writers of poetry.
April 11, 2018

RL Orientation Session on April 17th

Want to declare a minor or major? Have questions on our different tracks or some of our requirements? Come meet us, have some coffee and cookies!

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/685428888501994/

November 1, 2017

MA student writes about his experience attending the Middlebury College’s Portuguese language school

By Austin Vander Wel

For seven weeks this summer I had the privilege of attending Middlebury College’s Portuguese language school as they celebrated their 15th anniversary. This rigorous program prides itself in assuring language acquisition through complete immersion and intense exposure to the target language.

Along with five hours daily of specialized classes on grammar, pronunciation, and Lusophone culture, Middlebury’s Portuguese language school offers numerous extra-curricular activities to teach language in a relaxed environment. I decided to take advantage of this informal setting to further develop my Portuguese skills and maximize my time in the language. I read poetry, played volleyball, watched movies, and presented on the school’s weekly radio show exclusively in Portuguese, which greatly boosted my confidence in oral and written communication while building a community with other students. In our culture modules, I dove into the economic and political issues most pertinent to Brazil today, researched the rich afro-brazilian culture that continues to shape all aspects of Brazil, and found out how the myth of Orpheus and other stories live on in the symbolism of today’s Carnival celebrations.

At Middlebury, I had the opportunity to write a poem with the Portuguese writer Rui Zink and learn about the indigenous heritage of Brazil from the author Daniel Munduruku. I found that the other instructors were also extremely capable and welcoming; accepting my linguistic blunders as a necessary part of the learning process. Before long, our group saw considerable advances in our language abilities as we carried out our daily lives entirely in Portuguese.

At the heart of Middlebury’s intensive summer programs is their secret ingredient: the language pledge. While this pledge may deter fair-weather language learners, it was exactly what convinced me to apply to the program. Yes, I signed away the right to communicate in any language besides Portuguese for seven weeks, but this discipline was necessary to overcome my excessive use of “Portuñol,” or Portuguese mixed with Spanish, which had become a habit before attending Middlebury. With time and practice, I found myself resisting and eventually erasing these false cognates from my mind when speaking Portuguese. Although I still have more to learn about the language, I experienced immense linguistic growth in only seven weeks. For those interested, I highly recommend investigating Middlebury College’s language schools to see if this complete linguistic immersion interests you. Muito obrigado e boa sorte!

Click here to learn more about the Portuguese program at the UO. For more information, contact Bene Santos, supervisor of the Portuguese program, at benballe@uoregon.edu, or call (541) 346-4046.  Visit the Portuguese Courses page to see what PORT classes are currently being offered.

 

 

October 25, 2017

Students share their experiences studying Portuguese in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

By Shayla T Hayes

For the terms of Winter and Spring of 2017, I decided to start a journey to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil to study abroad through a program called CIEE. For these six and a half months I was able to immerse myself in the Brazilian culture and gain an experience I will never forget. I left in the beginning of January and flew in alongside a group of students that were both American and of other nationalities. I was placed into a host family who lives along the beach of Botafogo in Rio. This family consisted of a host mom, dad, and sister who was 9 years old. They also had a cat, Calvin, who became attached to me at the hip by the time I left. They all welcomed me with open arms, and I got to know them very well. None of them spoke English, so it forced me to practice my Portuguese right off the bat.

For the first month that I was in Brazil, I attended PUC-Rio. During this month, I took an intensive Portuguese. It was a lot to take in at once. On the bright side, I was able to meet a bunch of new students during this time, and I got to know my fellow international peers well. I then started school at ESPM in the central part of Rio. It was downtown and a business and design school. Here I studied photography and 3D animation for the next five months. I made some amazing Brazilian friends at ESPM. They guided me when I was lost, taught me things about Brazilian culture, and laughed with me just like any of my friends in the US would continue my Portuguese course studies, I had a private teacher through CIEE named Marco.

Outside of class, I experienced so many unforgettable things throughout the country. In February I was privileged enough to experience Carnival. It was indescribable, and the passion and liveliness were amazing. When I go back to Brazil, I hope to go during Carnival. I also traveled a lot. São Paulo, Vítoria, Salvador, Iguaçu, Ilha Grande and Argentina are just a few places to name. I had endless pictures from all of these journeys.

In Vítoria I was able to see my Brazilian brother, Vitor. I visited him at least four times during the six months. My mother also visited in May, and I was able to show her everything I was accomplishing and doing while exploring the wonderful country I lived in. Other things I did in my spare time was a hike, do internships with design, teach an English class to second graders, relax on the beach with a caipirinha in hand, and spend time with friends. I spent so much time on the beach and hiking it was insane. Other activities like soccer games, samba classes, and concerts were also on the list! Overall, I loved my time abroad. It was life-changing. Brazil has truly become a second home in my heart.

 

 

 

By Adrien Detchmendy

During Summer 2017, I traveled to Rio de Janeiro to participate in an intensive Portuguese language program. I had taken Portuguese classes at the U of O since my freshman year. Ever since I was young, Brazilian culture and the Portuguese language fascinated me, but I never was given the chance to take a Portuguese language class. When I entered into freshman year I signed up for Portuguese 101 taught by Bene Santos. Immediately I began to pick up the language with ease. I think a major factor into that was the professors teaching style. We drilled concepts but stuck to one a week, which gave me a strong base and understanding of the language. After I had finished the first year of Portuguese, my Portuguese professor suggested I look into studying abroad somewhere in Brazil. In fact, the professor strongly suggested it to all of the students in the class and implored people to travel to Brazil and experience the culture.

Going into my second year of Portuguese, I noticed the style of the class changed from the first year. Instead of focusing on vocabulary the focus was more on being capable to hold a conversation with a native speaker or someone who is learning as well. It was around this time I identified a summer program in Rio that looked good. As I began the process of applying, my professor couldn’t have been more helpful with it. She was more than happy to write me a recommendation to go and implored me to ask any questions or concerns I may have. Through the end of my second year in Portuguese, the class became increasingly focused on reading comprehension and conversation practice. One of our final projects was a 5-minute dialogue with another student about our summer plans. By doing all of the conversation practice and comprehension I felt I brought a strong understanding of the language with me to Brazil.

The program I was chose was an intensive Portuguese language course at PUC, a private Catholic university in Rio de Janeiro. From start to finish, the program lasted a little under 5 weeks. I was going to be staying with a host family in Copacabana. Going there, I really wasn’t sure what to expect. However, shortly I arrived I realized I had chosen the right place to come. The people in Brazil were warm, nice and very patient with me. They encouraged me to speak Portuguese anywhere I went and often they liked helping me practice so I could better learn and speak their language. Within the first week of being there I could feel my confidence increasing and by the end of my program, I was navigating the city and surrounding areas with ease. I think this transition, which can be so hard for others, was so easy for me because of all the conversation practice I had done in my Portuguese classes at the U of O.

 

March 25, 2017

Speak Spanish? Portuguese? Consider a Major or Minor in Latin American Studies

Investigate why Frida Kahlo’s paintings are so enduringly popular. Dive into the world of Latin American soccer. Separate fact from fiction in the biography of Ernesto “Che” Guevara. Sample popular dishes in countries across Latin America. The Latin American Studies Program offers an in-depth look at the richness and diversity of a vast area and its people. Whether pre–Columbian art, the striking wonder of the Amazon rainforest, or the history of colonialism tugs at your heartstrings, you’ll be forever changed by your newfound knowledge.

Take advantage of study abroad programs where you’ll travel to Costa Rica, Ecuador, Mexico, or other exciting places to sharpen your language skills and become familiar with new cultures. In Eugene, you can volunteer for a variety of organizations such as Centro Latino Americano, a local bilingual multicultural agency dedicated to helping the Latino community, or become politically active with the Latin American Solidarity Committee. UO students have also worked with the local school districts to mentor youth. Others have volunteered at Siempre Amigos, which provides health services to survivors of torture and political violence.

You’ll delve into politics, literature, science, ecology, and other engaging topics in courses such as Caribbean Migrants in the Literary Imagination or The Cold War in Latin America. Learn from top-notch scholars who offer encouragement in a supportive atmosphere.

Due to its inherently interdisciplinary training, our undergraduate major in Latin American Studies provides a thorough grounding in the languages, history, geography, and some of the central cultural and socio-economic issues at stake in the region. Career opportunities for students completing a degree in Latin American studies are available through such avenues as research centers, private foundations working in the area, international businesses, international nongovernmental organizations (including human-rights and environmental organizations), the Peace Corps, the United States Foreign Service, international aid programs, the United Nations and other international organizations.

June 22, 2016

Millar awarded fellowship at National Library of Portugal

Assistant Professor of Spanish Lanie Millar was awarded a month-long research fellowship at the National Library of Portugal in summer 2016.
Millar will be working in the government archives from the Salazar/ Estado Novo dictatorship (1933-1974), to examine how the Portuguese government was tracking international leftist networks that involved intellectuals from the Portuguese African colonies in the mid-twentieth century. This research will help Millar illuminate how contemporary Angolan literature responds to ideas developed in Portugal about the colonies and their subjects.
bibnacport
April 14, 2016

Brazilian author Salgado Maranhão and his translator Alexis Levitin

Monday, April 18th, RL, LAS and Translation Studies will host Brazilian Poet Salgado Maranhão and translator Alexis Levitin on our campus. We will have a Brown Bag @ 12pm at the Mills International Center and a public bilingual reading/discussion at 4:30pm at the Browsing Room in the Knight Library. I hope you can join us for some of these event! Find below a short bio on both Salgado Maranhão and Alexis Levitin.
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Salgado Maranhão won the prestigious Prêmio Jabuti in 1999 with Mural of Winds. In 2011, The Color of the Word won the Brazilian Academy of Letters highest poetry award. In 2014, the Brazilian PEN Club chose his recent collection, Mapping the Tribe, as best book of poetry for the year. In 2015 the Brazilian Writers Union gave him first prize, again for The Color of the Word. His newest book is Opera of Nos, launching in September in Rio de Janeiro. In addition to ten books of poetry, he has written song lyrics and made recordings with some of Brazil’s leading jazz and pop musicians. His work has appeared in numerous magazines in the USA, including Bitter Oleander, BOMB, Cream City Review, Dirty Goat, Florida Review, Massachusetts Review, and Spoon River Poetry Review. Here in the USA, he is represented by two bilingual collections of poetry: Blood of the Sun (Milkweed Editions, 2012) and Tiger Fur (White Pine Press, 2015).
Alexis Levitin’s thirty-nine books of translation include Clarice Lispector’s Soulstorm and Eugenio de Andrade’s Forbidden Words, both from New Directions. Recent books include Salgado Maranhão’s Blood of the Sun (Milkweed Editions, 2012), Eugenio de Andrade’s The Art of Patience (Red Dragonfly Press, 2013), Ana Minga’s Tobacco Dogs (The Bitter Oleander Press, 2013), Santiago Vizcaino’s Destruction in the Afternoon (Diálogos Books, 2015), Sophia de Mello Breyner Andresen’s Exemplary Tales (Tagus Press, 2015) and Salgado Maranhão’s Tiger Fur (White Pine Press, 2015). In 2012, Levitin and Maranhao completed a three month reading tour of the USA, visiting over fifty colleges and other institutions. In tre spring of 2016, they will be reading from Blood of the Sun and Tiger Fur in the Northeast, the Midwest, and the West Coast.

February 18, 2014

Carnevale 2014, February 17th-21st

French, Italian, and Portuguese faculty from the Romance Languages Department will lead a week long series of events to celebrate Carnevale 2014.  All events will be held in the Global Scholars Hall on the University of Oregon campus.  Learn to cook French Liege Waffles!  Learn to dance the Capoeira! Watch a movie!

Carnevale2014

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