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Posts under tag: migration

March 6, 2018

CLLAS Symposium

Justice Across Borders: Gender, Race, and Migration in the Americas

March 8, 2018
Knight Library, Browsing Room, 1501 Kincaid St.
Gerlinger Lounge, 1468 University St.
Free & open to the public

Our thematic line of inquiry this year: America, Bridge Between Oceans poses the following questions: What happens when we put the Atlantic world in conversation with the Pacific? What kind of art and cultural production emerges? Which stories of struggles for racial, economic, gender and environmental justice arise? How does looking at Latinx and Latin American Studies from within the Pacific Rim region open up innovative and necessary methodological and analytical horizons? These questions also inspire our symposium Justice Across Borders: Gender, Race, and Migration in the Americas.

Fostering conversations about race, ethnicity, diasporas, gender, sexuality, migration, environmental justice, and culture that bridge the Atlantic and Pacific world, the symposium Justice Across Borders: Gender, Race, and Migration in the Americas explores what kind of new knowledges, art, social transformations, and activism we can create together in the face of increasing inequalities and social violence across the continent. We meditate on what contributions emerge from Pacific Rim-based research, art, advocacy work, and political movements when we put ourselves in conversation with scholars, artists, and activists based in the Atlantic coast.  We will discuss the increasing visibility of Caribbean migrants in the Pacific Northwest, environmental justice issues in Mexico, the U.S., Puerto Rico and the Southern Cone, archipelagic studies that encompass Caribbean and Pacific islands, gender politics within Latin American and Latinx communities in Oregon, experiences of Latin Americans alongside Pacific Islanders in the Pacific Rim region, queer Latina and AfroLatin@ art, indigeneity, blackness and Jewish diasporas in Latin America, challenges faced by a variety of Latinx communities in the U.S., etc. From a Latinx and Latin American Studies perspective, we engage comparative and relational dialogues with fields such as Pacific Islander Studies, Asian and Asian American Studies, Black Studies, Native American Studies, among others, hoping to bring new light into the epistemic possibilities of our fields and the meaning of Justice for all of us.

Symposium organizer: Alaí Reyes-Santos

Full list of affiliations

9:00 – 9:15 AM (Browsing Room)
Welcome from UO administration officials, CLLAS director, symposium coordinator.

9:20-10:30 AM (Browsing Room)
Race, Ethnicity and Diasporas
Rocio ZambranaLanie Millar, Roberto Arroyo
Chair: Marta Maldonado

10:40-11:50 AM (Browsing Room)
Women and Gender in Latin America and U.S. Latinx communities
Vicky Falcon, Michelle McKinleyKristin YarrisLynn StephenGabriela Martinez
Chair: Vicky Falcon,  Instituto de Cultura Oregoniana

12:00- 1:00 PM (Gerlinger Alumni Lounge)
Keynote Speaker/Lunch

“New Directions in Latinx and Latin American Studies: Archipelagos Across the Caribbean and the Pacific”
Guest: Yolanda Martinez-San Miguel
Chair: Rocio Zambrana and Lanie Millar

2:00-3:00 PM (Browsing Room)
Environmental Justice in the Americas
Judith Vega; David VazquezSarah WaldAnalisa TaylorPedro Garcia-Caro
Chair: David Vazquez

3:10 – 4:30 PM Roundtable (Browsing Room)
“Art, Migration, and Political Activism: Caribbean and Pacific Islander Migrants in the Pacific”
[SPONSORS: Department of Ethnic Studies, the Wayne Morse Center for Law & Politics, and the Center for Asia and Pacific Studies (CAPS)]
Panelists:  Judith Sierra-Rivera; JoAnna Poblete; Philipp Carrasco, Oregon AFL-CIO; Ileana Rodriguez Silva; Joyce Pualani Warren; and Jannes Martinez, Iyalocha, Lukumi priestess
Chair: Alaí Reyes-Santos

4:40PM – 5:40 PM  Plenary Session (Browsing Room)
“Latinx Communities: Questions, Challenges, and Transformations”
Monica Rojas, Director, Movimiento AfroLatino de Seattle; Laura Pulido; Ramona Hernández; Edwin Melendez, Director, Center for Puerto Rican Studies
Chair: Gerardo Sandoval

6:00 PM – 7:30 PM (Gerlinger Alumni Lounge)
RiffiandoDominican Artists in the House! A Talk/Reading/Performance
Josefina BaezAna-Maurine Lara, and Ernesto Lara
Coordinator: Ana-Maurine Lara

Light Dinner/Reception

Sponsored by the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS); Wayne Morse Center for Law & Politics; UO College of Arts and Sciences; The Office of the Provost; Center for the Study of Women in Society (CSWS); Latin American Studies program; Department of English; Department of Romance Languages; Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; Department of Anthropology; School of Journalism and Communication; Department of Philosophy; the Center for Asia and Pacific Studies (CAPS); the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA); Department of Ethnic Studies; Global Studies Institute, and the Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides (NCAP).

October 4, 2011

Mba Ekani writes on time and memory in novel of Fatou Diome

Ph.D student  in French Lise Mba Ekani recently published an essay, “Kétala de Fatou Diome: poétique de l’ici et l’ailleurs entre écriture du souvenir et expériences du temps” (Kétala by Fatou Diome: The poetics of here and there between writing memory and the experience of time)  in an edited volume entitled Exils et migrations postcoloniales (Postcolonial Exiles and Migrations) edited by  Pierre Fandio and Hervé Tchumkam, with a foreword and postscript by Fabien Eboussi Boulaga and Bernard Mouralis, two leading thinkers in African philosophy and literature. The 365 page edited volume in honor of Professor Ambroise Kom was published by Editions Ifrikiya (Cameroon), and was presented to the public on July 8, 2011 at the Librarie des Peuples Noirs in Yaoundé, Cameroon.

Mba Ekani’s article discusses the relationship between history, memory and forgetting in  Fatou Diome’s novel Kétala. The novel narrates the peregrinations of a young girl exiled from her native Africa and living in France. Mba Ekani suggests that the narrator’s struggle to battle amnesia often takes shape against the backdrop of collective memory. According to her, the work’s distinctiveness lies in the author’s personification of objects that are responsible for putting pieces of memory together. Mba Ekani contends that the novel offers tools both for a radical reinterpretation of African modernity and for making us think differently about the passing of time.