Skip to Content

Posts under tag: Italian

  Page 1 of 2  Next Page »
June 10, 2019

UO Language Students earn Global Seal of Biliteracy

[see the corresponding article in the Register-Guard]

The University of Oregon has awarded 210 language students with the Global Seal of Biliteracy in French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese and Spanish in an inaugural program. Recipients tested to qualify for the new Global Seal of Biliteracy and can use the language credential to document their skills for jobs and study abroad opportunities.

The Yamada Language Center event was attended by awardees, university language professors, Sheila Bong of Avant Assessment, and Global Seal of Biliteracy representative, Hunter Sudek.

Students earned either the Functional Fluency or Working Fluency Global Seal of Biliteracy award by taking the STAMP 4S test, whichwas created at the University of Oregon’s Center for Applied Second Language Studies (CASLS).

Awardees will be well prepared, according to a recently released survey of 1,200 upper-level managers and human resources professionals conducted by Ipsos Public Affairs.  “Making Languages Our Business: Addressing Foreign Language Demand Among U.S. Employers,”found that 9 out of 10 US employers rely on U.S. based employees with language skills other than English and that a majority of employers report that their need for foreign languages has increased over the past five years and project that it will continue to grow.

April 11, 2019

Spring Speaker Series: Misogyny

 

Wednesday, April 24th

Fabian Alfie, Professor of Italian, University of Arizona

“Many Men Talking with the Same Mouth: The Discourse/s of Misogyny in Medieval Italian Literature.”
3:30-5:00PM, 151 McKENZIE HALL

 

 

Wednesday, May 8th

Renée-Claude Breitenstein, Associate Professor of French, Brock University

“Defending the Female Sex: Collected Eulogies of Women in the French Renaissance.”

3:30-5:00PM, 151 McKENZIE HALL

 

Friday, May 17th

Verónica Gago, University of Buenos Aires/CONICET

“El cuerpo del trabajo: una lectura desde la huelga feminista/The body of work: a reading from the feminist strike.”

3:30-5:00PM, CRATER LAKE ROOM SOUTH, EMU

 

Tuesday, May 21st

Samantha Irby

Keynote Speaker: Women in Media Symposium

7:00PM, LILLIS 182

 

April 8, 2019

ITAL 399 Student-Producers Create Cooking Shows based on Historical Italian Cookbooks

 

See Garvin’s course featured in Around the O‘s story on the LIFT program (June 20, 2019)

In ITAL 399: Mediterranean Foodways, Assistant Professor of Italian Diana Garvin’s students produced their own cooking shows in Italian. They prepared 19thand 20th recipes for tortellini and minestrone, and explained the historical context that determined ingredient choices and preparation methods. In doing so, students learned how to analyze primary sources and navigate digital archives, thus launching their Italian studies at UO into the wider world.

Academia Barilla’s Gastronomic Library provided the course’s digital research site. Students perused historical cookbooks from the Italian Unification, like Pellegrino Artusi’s “Science in the Kitchen and the Art of Eating Well” (1891) and from the Fascist period, like F.T. Marinetti’s “The Futurist Cookbook” (1932).Then they selected an original recipe, and got cooking. In their shows, Sofia Deiro and Ashley Gray brilliantly connected decreasing cooking times and increased meat consumption with evolving gender roles across Southern Europe. Cristian Jobe and Gabriel Barnatan thoughtfully observed how regional dishes later transformed into national cuisine. Bi-weekly media labs examined filmic techniques of Italian cooking shows from Gambero Rosso and Giallo Zafferano to teach basic film techniques, ultimately preparing ITAL 399 students to serve up a new kind of cooking show with a taste for Italian history.

Garvin at the Wolfsonian Institute (Miami, FL)

Thanks to the research support of the Center for the Study of Women, Professor Garvin will continue to develop new materials for ITAL 399, to be taught again in Winter 2020, as an extension of her book project, “Feeding Fascism: Tabletop Politics in Italy, 1922-1945.”

 

See some of the students’ work here:

Gabriel and Cristian: https://youtu.be/ahVNJKLao10

Ashley and Sofia: https://youtu.be/XgIPbneCnfI

December 13, 2018

Prof. Nathalie Hester Awarded NEH Research Fellowship

Nathalie Hester, Associate Professor of French and Italian, has been awarded a prestigious and highly selective National Endowment for the Humanities Research Fellowship for her in-progress book project, Inventing America in Baroque Italy: Columbus, Vespucci, and New World Epic. 

Inventing America in Baroque Italyexamines the ways in which, at a time when most of the Italian peninsula was a colony of Spain, seventeenth-century Italian poets represent Italy’s role in the exploration and conquest of the Americas.  Taking as its corpus eleven epic poems written in the Italian vernacular between 1596 and 1650, Hester’s bookconsiders the relationship between baroque epic poetry and local politics; between Italian poems about the Americas and Spanish colonialism; and between literary production and emerging notions of Italian identity.  A principal argument of this study is that the heated debates about representing Columbus and Vespucci as epic heroes inevitably point to concerns about Europe’s global expansion and Italy’s role in that expansion. This project sheds light on texts that have not received adequate attention in studies of early modern European colonialism and in scholarship on the reception of the Americas in seventeenth-century Italy.

Congratulations, Dr. Hester!

October 30, 2018

Prof. Rigoletto publishes an essay on Italian film star Anna Magnani and postwar populism

Sergio Rigoletto, Associate Professor of Italian and Cinema Studies, has published an essay entitled “(Un)dressing authenticity: Neorealist stardom and Anna Magnani in the postwar era (1945-48)” in the Journal of Italian Cinema and Media (Vol.6 Number 8, 2018; pp. 389-403). The essay explores Magnani’s significance as a populist icon during the postwar years and unpacks some of the meanings behind a notion that has been frequently associated with Magnani: authenticity. Focusing on the study of Magnani’s costumes in Rome Open City (Rossellini 1945) and in a number of popular comedies made between 1945 and 1948, alongside the clothes worn by the actress in her off-screen appearances, the essay reveals some of the crucial ways in which Magnani’s clothing staged several tensions which were particularlu useful to the institutional discourse of Neorealism to negotiate the transition from fascism to postwar democracy (e.g. audience recognition vs. misrecognition; historical truth vs. ideological mystification; individuality vs. collectivism). The essay proposes a way of thinking about the notion of authenticity that may allow us to move beyond a “reflectionist” framework, in which the authentic is simply a synonym for what looks real or original. Instead, through an analysis of Magnani’s star narrative and the function of clothing within this narrative, Rigoletto argues that authenticity reveals itself as a performative effect, unfolding through the opening of a space of absence in which the experience of the “inauthentic” is repeatedly confronted. Under these terms, the essay demonstrates that the category of authenticity functions as an effect of the inauthentic, rather than simply as its opposite.

May 21, 2018

Thinking Authenticity Series: Noa Steimatsky

Please join us for the final lecture of the ‘Thinking Authenticity’
Speaking Series

Noa Steimatsky (Berkeley/ACLS)

‘The Face on Film: Made and Unmade’

Wed May 23
3-5pm  Willamette 100

Noa Steimatsky is Fellow of the American Council of Learned Society and  Visiting Associate Professor of Italian at UC Berkeley. Exploring the ways in which the facial close-up has often been described in film criticism as a moment of truth within the cinematic image, the lecture will show that the face is much more than the quintessential incarnation of the person and that our encounter with its representation is also predicated on a sense of ambiguity and illegibility.

Click here to see the event on Facebook.

May 14, 2018

RL Undergraduates Receive Prestigious Awards

Two of our outstanding Romance Languages majors received impressive recognition from the awards committee. Please congratulate these students for their wonderful contributions to the UO community and their impressive academic efforts. We are very fortunate to have such inspiring undergraduate students in our department.

Sara Espinosa, RL (FR & SPAN) & Journalism (PR) major Vernon Barkhurst Sophomore Award: (THE sophomore award) This award is given to a sophomore who best exemplifies academic excellence, university service and good citizenship. This award was established in 1984 in honor of Vernon Barkhurst, who served as Director of Admissions, Associate Dean of Students, and Conduct Coordinator.

Cecelia Barajas, RL (FR & ITAL): Junior Award – Gerlinger Cup (one of only five awards given to juniors): The Gerlinger Cup, first presented in 1914, is the gift of the late  Irene Gerlinger, a member of the University Board of Regents from 1914 to 1929. The cup is awarded to the outstanding junior woman selected for scholarship, leadership, and service to the university.

Congratulations, Sara and Cecelia!

 

April 11, 2018

RL Orientation Session on April 17th

Want to declare a minor or major? Have questions on our different tracks or some of our requirements? Come meet us, have some coffee and cookies!

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/685428888501994/

April 4, 2018

Special Screening of FIRE AT SEA (Gianfranco Rosi) on April 19th

The Department of Romance Languages invites you to a Special Screening of FIRE AT SEA (G. Rosi: 2016)

When: Thursday, April 19 (5pm)
Where: PLC 180

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/2121597754730134/

Introduced by Prof. Alberto Zambenedetti (U. of Toronto)

An Academy Award nominee for Best Documentary Feature and the first nonfiction film to ever win the top prize at the Berlin International Film Festival, Fire at Sea takes place in Lampedusa, a remote Mediterranean island that has become a major entry point for refugees into Europe.

PROF. ALBERTO ZAMBENDETTI is Assistant Professor of Italian and Cinema Studies at the University of Toronto. His scholarship focuses on questions of human mobility (from migration to tourism) in Italian cinema and on the relation between film and urban environments.

March 16, 2018

Hester publishes article on baroque poetry about Christopher Columbus

This essay examines Girolamo Graziani’s well-received epic poem, Il Conquisto di Granata (The Conquest of Granada, 1650), as a compelling piece of an Italian genealogy of New World Italian epic poetry, to which corpus the Conquisto belongs, despite its title. Indeed, in a convenient reworking of the historical timeline, the Columbus of this work returns to Spain from his first voyage to the Americas in time to fight the Moors of Granada, and he plays a decisive role in their defeat. The poetic project of the Conquisto incorporates three main aims: to address and remedy criticisms leveled against earlier Italian epic poetry about the New World, to establish Columbus as the narrative and ideological link between Conquest and Reconquest and, more broadly, to maintain the international status of Italian letters at a time when deeds and facts—expansion, colonialism—come to define the prestige of European proto-nations.

Hester, Nathalie. “Baroque Italian Epic from Granada to the New World: Columbus Conquers the Moors.” The Discovery of the New World in Early Modern Italy: Encounters with the Americas in the 16th-18th Centuries. Eds. Elizabeth Horodowich and Lia Markey. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2017. 270-287.

  Page 1 of 2  Next Page »


Skip to toolbar