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Posts under tag: Italian

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December 13, 2018

Prof. Nathalie Hester Awarded NEH Research Fellowship

Nathalie Hester, Associate Professor of French and Italian, has been awarded a prestigious and highly selective National Endowment for the Humanities Research Fellowship for her in-progress book project, Inventing America in Baroque Italy: Columbus, Vespucci, and New World Epic. 

Inventing America in Baroque Italyexamines the ways in which, at a time when most of the Italian peninsula was a colony of Spain, seventeenth-century Italian poets represent Italy’s role in the exploration and conquest of the Americas.  Taking as its corpus eleven epic poems written in the Italian vernacular between 1596 and 1650, Hester’s bookconsiders the relationship between baroque epic poetry and local politics; between Italian poems about the Americas and Spanish colonialism; and between literary production and emerging notions of Italian identity.  A principal argument of this study is that the heated debates about representing Columbus and Vespucci as epic heroes inevitably point to concerns about Europe’s global expansion and Italy’s role in that expansion. This project sheds light on texts that have not received adequate attention in studies of early modern European colonialism and in scholarship on the reception of the Americas in seventeenth-century Italy.

Congratulations, Dr. Hester!

October 30, 2018

Prof. Rigoletto publishes an essay on Italian film star Anna Magnani and postwar populism

Sergio Rigoletto, Associate Professor of Italian and Cinema Studies, has published an essay entitled “(Un)dressing authenticity: Neorealist stardom and Anna Magnani in the postwar era (1945-48)” in the Journal of Italian Cinema and Media (Vol.6 Number 8, 2018; pp. 389-403). The essay explores Magnani’s significance as a populist icon during the postwar years and unpacks some of the meanings behind a notion that has been frequently associated with Magnani: authenticity. Focusing on the study of Magnani’s costumes in Rome Open City (Rossellini 1945) and in a number of popular comedies made between 1945 and 1948, alongside the clothes worn by the actress in her off-screen appearances, the essay reveals some of the crucial ways in which Magnani’s clothing staged several tensions which were particularlu useful to the institutional discourse of Neorealism to negotiate the transition from fascism to postwar democracy (e.g. audience recognition vs. misrecognition; historical truth vs. ideological mystification; individuality vs. collectivism). The essay proposes a way of thinking about the notion of authenticity that may allow us to move beyond a “reflectionist” framework, in which the authentic is simply a synonym for what looks real or original. Instead, through an analysis of Magnani’s star narrative and the function of clothing within this narrative, Rigoletto argues that authenticity reveals itself as a performative effect, unfolding through the opening of a space of absence in which the experience of the “inauthentic” is repeatedly confronted. Under these terms, the essay demonstrates that the category of authenticity functions as an effect of the inauthentic, rather than simply as its opposite.

May 21, 2018

Thinking Authenticity Series: Noa Steimatsky

Please join us for the final lecture of the ‘Thinking Authenticity’
Speaking Series

Noa Steimatsky (Berkeley/ACLS)

‘The Face on Film: Made and Unmade’

Wed May 23
3-5pm  Willamette 100

Noa Steimatsky is Fellow of the American Council of Learned Society and  Visiting Associate Professor of Italian at UC Berkeley. Exploring the ways in which the facial close-up has often been described in film criticism as a moment of truth within the cinematic image, the lecture will show that the face is much more than the quintessential incarnation of the person and that our encounter with its representation is also predicated on a sense of ambiguity and illegibility.

Click here to see the event on Facebook.

May 14, 2018

RL Undergraduates Receive Prestigious Awards

Two of our outstanding Romance Languages majors received impressive recognition from the awards committee. Please congratulate these students for their wonderful contributions to the UO community and their impressive academic efforts. We are very fortunate to have such inspiring undergraduate students in our department.

Sara Espinosa, RL (FR & SPAN) & Journalism (PR) major Vernon Barkhurst Sophomore Award: (THE sophomore award) This award is given to a sophomore who best exemplifies academic excellence, university service and good citizenship. This award was established in 1984 in honor of Vernon Barkhurst, who served as Director of Admissions, Associate Dean of Students, and Conduct Coordinator.

Cecelia Barajas, RL (FR & ITAL): Junior Award – Gerlinger Cup (one of only five awards given to juniors): The Gerlinger Cup, first presented in 1914, is the gift of the late  Irene Gerlinger, a member of the University Board of Regents from 1914 to 1929. The cup is awarded to the outstanding junior woman selected for scholarship, leadership, and service to the university.

Congratulations, Sara and Cecelia!

 

April 11, 2018

RL Orientation Session on April 17th

Want to declare a minor or major? Have questions on our different tracks or some of our requirements? Come meet us, have some coffee and cookies!

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/685428888501994/

April 4, 2018

Special Screening of FIRE AT SEA (Gianfranco Rosi) on April 19th

The Department of Romance Languages invites you to a Special Screening of FIRE AT SEA (G. Rosi: 2016)

When: Thursday, April 19 (5pm)
Where: PLC 180

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/2121597754730134/

Introduced by Prof. Alberto Zambenedetti (U. of Toronto)

An Academy Award nominee for Best Documentary Feature and the first nonfiction film to ever win the top prize at the Berlin International Film Festival, Fire at Sea takes place in Lampedusa, a remote Mediterranean island that has become a major entry point for refugees into Europe.

PROF. ALBERTO ZAMBENDETTI is Assistant Professor of Italian and Cinema Studies at the University of Toronto. His scholarship focuses on questions of human mobility (from migration to tourism) in Italian cinema and on the relation between film and urban environments.

March 16, 2018

Hester publishes article on baroque poetry about Christopher Columbus

This essay examines Girolamo Graziani’s well-received epic poem, Il Conquisto di Granata (The Conquest of Granada, 1650), as a compelling piece of an Italian genealogy of New World Italian epic poetry, to which corpus the Conquisto belongs, despite its title. Indeed, in a convenient reworking of the historical timeline, the Columbus of this work returns to Spain from his first voyage to the Americas in time to fight the Moors of Granada, and he plays a decisive role in their defeat. The poetic project of the Conquisto incorporates three main aims: to address and remedy criticisms leveled against earlier Italian epic poetry about the New World, to establish Columbus as the narrative and ideological link between Conquest and Reconquest and, more broadly, to maintain the international status of Italian letters at a time when deeds and facts—expansion, colonialism—come to define the prestige of European proto-nations.

Hester, Nathalie. “Baroque Italian Epic from Granada to the New World: Columbus Conquers the Moors.” The Discovery of the New World in Early Modern Italy: Encounters with the Americas in the 16th-18th Centuries. Eds. Elizabeth Horodowich and Lia Markey. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2017. 270-287.

October 30, 2017

“Queering Internal Exile on Italian Screen” a Public Lecture by Prof. Dana Renga

On Thursday Nov. 16th Prof. Renga (Chair of Italian and French at Ohio State University) will give a lecture on the forced exile of several homosexual inmates during fascism as represented and memorialized in a number of Italian documentaries and fiction films.

Gerlinger Lounge
Nov. 16th (5pm)

In 2003, multi-term ex-prime minister of Italy Silvio Berlusconi stated: ‘I understand the difficulties of teaching democracy to a people who for nearly forty years have known only dictatorship.’ Interviewer Nicholas Farrell prompted: ‘Like Italy at the fall of Fascism.’ To this, Berlusconi infamously declared ‘That was a much more benign dictatorship; Mussolini did not murder anyone. Mussolini sent people on holidays to confine them to banishment to small islands such as Ponza or Maddalena which are now exclusive resorts.’ The promotion of internal exile (‘confino’) as holiday is particularly interesting when considering the experience of men sent to the islands for suspicion of ‘pederasty’ (as it was referred to at the time). As this talk discusses, gay men found a certain amount of freedom on an island prison where conditions were grim, barracks were overcrowded, illness was rampant, jobs were unavailable, and the average stipend was only four lire per day. At the same time, the experience of gay men sent into internal exile is cloaked in silence. The lecture interrogates this silence by looking at two feature films, three documentaries, and a graphic novel that treat, to different degrees, the experiences of gay men sent into internal exile.

 

 

October 22, 2017

Prof. Rigoletto publishes an essay on queer visibility in contemporary Italian documentaries

Prof. Sergio Rigoletto has published an essay titled ‘Against the Telelological Preseumption: Notes on Queer Visibility in Contemporary Italian Film’ in The Italianist 37: 2, 2017. The essay is concerned with some of the problems involved in the task of narrating the queer self. At a time in which positive queer representations have become increasingly common in Italian cinema and other media, it is worth asking what conditions underpin the present regime of queer visibility and what alternative queer experiences have been either obscured or marginalized. The first half of the essay explores the recent popularity of the coming out narrative in the Italian context. The essay asks what epistemological assumptions underlie the metaphor of coming out and how such assumptions have come to affect the terms under which queerness appears now visible in Italian cinema and other media. The second section of the essay focuses on several recent Italian documentaries including La bocca del lupo (Marcello: 2009), Felice chi è diverso (Amelio: 2013) and Le coccinelle. Sceneggiata transessuale (Pirelli: 2011). The essay shows the complex ways in which these films deploy their dissident strategies of queer self-revelation and configurations of social legibility.

 

Le coccinelle. Transsexual Melodrama  (Pirelli: 2011)

October 3, 2017

Kevin Regan-Maglione wins CAS fellowship to research collection of Reinaldo Arenas Papers at Princeton University Library

Kevin Regan-Maglione, a 4th-year doctoral candidate in Italian and Spanish in the Department of Romance Languages, received the Charles A. Reed Fellowship from UO College of Arts and Sciences to do archival research for his dissertation, which focuses on queer subjectivities and prison testimonies.

This fellowship will fund his research during the Spring 2018 term at the Princeton University Library, where its Manuscript Division holds the Reinaldo Arenas Papers, a collection that consists of typescripts and manuscripts of novels and novellas, short stories, plays and screenplays, poetry, nonfiction, correspondence, and miscellaneous material, produced by the Cuban author.

Kevin is also interested in the author’s 135 letters to Jorge and Margarita Camacho, also held there. Kevin expects these materials will provide invaluable insight into Arenas’ conceptualization of his autobiographical testimonial writing. The second chapter of Kevin’s dissertation deconstructs the testimonial drive and show how queerness operates within and against normative testimonial prison writing.

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