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Posts under tag: Cory Browning

April 26, 2016

Round Table Conversation and Public Presentation: David Scott (Columbia University)

Wednesday, April 27, “RL 623: Comparative Modernities”, co-taught by Cory Browning and Mayra Bottaro, will host Professor David Scott on our campus. His visit is part of the Annual RL 623 Speaker Series. We will have a Round Table Conversation with UO Faculty and graduate students from 3:30-5pm in Chapman Hall 202, and a public presentation “Michael Manley’s Styles of Radical Will” at 6-7:30pm in Lillis 112. We hope you can join us for one or both of these events!

Event co-sponsored by: Romance Languages Department, English Department, COLT, European Studies Program, Latin American Studies Program, College of Arts and Sciences, Oregon Humanities Center.

Professor David Scott’s work has been concerned with the reconceptualization of the way we think the story of the colonial past for the postcolonial present. His work has been highly influential in areas beyond the field of Anthropology. He is the author of Refashioning Futures (1999), Conscripts of Modernity (2004), Omens of Adversity (2014), and has recently completed a book called Stuart Hall’s Voice: Intimations of an Ethics of Receptive Generosity (based on his lectures at the University of the Western Cape, South Africa, in November-December 2013). He is currently working on a biography of Stuart Hall and on a study of the question of reparations for the historical injustice of New World slavery. He is the editor of Small Axe, and director of the Small Axe Project, which is involved in

December 1, 2015

Global Perspectives on the November 13 Terrorist Attacks in Paris

Our Department Co-sponsored an open discussion on global terror networks, imperialism, states of exception and increased militarization with a selected group of experts and a lively participation from the public.

image image image image imageThursday, December 3, EMU Ballroom, 12-2pm

Speakers: Cory Browning (RL), Angela Joya (IS), Matthias Mathijs (IS, Johns Hopkins), Fabienne Moore (RL), Sebastián Urioste (RL), Anita Weiss (International Studies).

Here is what some Romance Languages students had to say about the event:

“The panel discussion of the terrorist attacks in Paris was a well-planned and a thoughtful event. The professors […] that were giving their lectures brought up some well thought-out insights that I did not know or even realize were being taken into factor when discussing the terror attacks in Paris.”
Moriah Frazier

“I found the discussion to be a great learning experience and I hope I can attend more events like this in the future.”
Abby Hauth

“It was refreshing to be able to get the perspectives of people who weren’t the media and weren’t overly biased in their comments.”
Meaghan Donovan

“After hearing everything people had to say in this seminar I believe our best weapon against incidents like this is education. […] People need to be able to see the humanity of the situation in the world and examine it so that they can come to an educated conclusion.”
Hank Manilla

And Romance Languages Professor Leah Middlebrook wrote:

“The discussion was powerful and moving, and the audience engagement and response demonstrates how much we need these types of events right now […] The thoughtful conversation that took place in the second half of the program did much to counteract the sense of helplessness and frustration that has been building over the past months.”

Sponsored by the Program in European Studies, the Department of Romance Languages, the Department of International Studies, and UO International AffairsParis

May 19, 2014

Cory Browning to Join UO RL Fall 14

Cory Browning is completing his PhD in Romance Studies at Cornell University. Cory’s research focuses primarily on nineteenth-century French literature, but he also works on eighteenth and twentieth century French and Francophone literature, aesthetics and politics, and the fledgling field of terrorism studies. His dissertation analyzes the French Revolutionary Terror and its “restagings” in French Romanticism, the advent of avant-garde theater and anarcho-terrorism in the wake of the Paris Commune, and the Algerian War. Recasting Marx’s observation that humanity makes its own history but under conditions handed down from the past, his research strives to apprehend the multiple ways the Terror has shaped how we think and practice both literature and democracy. He has also completed a Masters and done research at the Université de Paris 8, working extensively on Charles Baudelaire and Stéphane Mallarmé. His next projects include investigations into terrorism and contemporary critical theory and a study into the aesthetics of the cliché in Gustave Flaubert.



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