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Posts under tag: Colonial Literature

April 2, 2018

García-Caro Contributes to Cambridge History of Latina/o American Literature

Pedro Garcia-Caro has recently published a book chapter entitled “Performing to a Captive Audience: Dramatic Encounters in the Borderlands of Empire.” The Cambridge History of Latina/o American Literature edited by John Morán González and Laura Lomas. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018. 51-73. 
In his chapter García-Caro contours different practices of cultural performance by Spanish conquistadors and settlers in areas that would go on to become part of the US throughout the nineteenth century. From the early military campaigns and displays of religious and military power staging the colonial “claim” to the land through the “Requerimiento” in the sixteenth century, the staging of miracles and dance-dramas, through to satirical drama in the eighteenth century, public performance underlines the formation of cultural captivity of the colonized indigenous others, while increasingly revealing the divide and competition between religious and secular cultural agendas in the Spanish-speaking colonial space. García-Caro offers a comprehensive survey of the configuration of cultural hegemonies around public performance which relegated indigenous agency and cultural legitimacy to the role of spectator of incoming imperial narratives. Drawing from his recent research on the first Californio secular play Astucias por heredar, and contextualizing the long history of Hispanic colonial presence in the North American continent, García-Caro proposes an original framework to consider the relation of colonial cultural production as constantly tied to the objective of control, acculturation, and domination.
February 22, 2018

García-Caro Publishes First Californio Drama

Astucias por heredar, un sobrino a un tío (1789) by Fermín de Reygadas has recently come out as an e-book available on different electronic formats. It is a critical, annotated, edition with a detailed introduction to the context, the author, and the provenance of this comedy. According to the oral and written sources surrounding its donation to the Bancroft collection (which forms the basis for UC Berkeley’s Library) by Californio historian Guadalupe Vallejo, Astucias was “the first drama performed in California after its foundation” as a Spanish colony in 1769.

García-Caro’s groundbreaking research has located the source of the play in Mexico, including the censorship files which had banned it from the Mexican stage in 1790, and has traced the likely place of its performance, in the secular Villa de Branciforte, in what is now Eastern Santa Cruz. This play is a Neoclassic comedy which clearly draws heavily from French and Italian sources but is profoundly familiar with Spanish literary traditions as well and completely adapted for a Hispano-Mexican audience. The fact that it remained in manuscript form and has never before been printed or published has meant that the text remained uncensored with all its original lines, which include a large number of improprieties that could have otherwise been lost along the way.

It is a rare find as we have relatively scant information and little textual evidence of the kind of cultural production that secular Hispanic settlers engaged in or brought with them as they populated the emerging network of villas and pueblos in what is now the US South West in the 17th and 18th centuries.

The play is now available through Arte Público Press, the preeminent publisher of contemporary Latino and Recovered US Hispanic Literature. Teatro Milagro in Portland took up Prof. García-Caro’s proposal to stage this original play and shows run February 9th to March 3rd in Spanish with English superscripts. Early reviews of the production are raving about the currency of the topics and the humorous exchanges, as well as the vibrancy of the language. The troupe of actors at Teatro Milagro comes from a diverse set of backgrounds from all over the Spanish-speaking Americas, and is working under the direction of commedia dell’arte expert Robi Arce, from Puerto Rico. Prof. García-Caro and theatre Director Robi Arce participated on February 16th in a roundtable at Portland State University, a recording is available here.

Watch Latino Network TV news on the play!



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