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Posts under tag: Chilean literature

September 19, 2017

Sept 26-27: Chilean poet, Raúl ZURITA at UO

RAÚL ZURITA (1950) is one of Latin America’s most celebrated poets. His works include Purgatorio (1979), Anteparaíso (1982), Canto a su amor desaparecido (1985), La Vida Nueva (1994), INRI (2003) and Zurita (2011). Through his writings, Zurita chronicles the violent history of Chile’s military dictatorship as well as that of the Americas since the conquest. In 1979, along with other artists, he founded CADA, Colectivo de Acciones de Arte, an art action group dedicated to the creation of political art that would resist the military regime. In 1982, he composed a poem in the sky over New York, and in 1993 he bulldozed “ni pena ni miedo” (no pain no fear) into the coarse sands of the Desert of Atacama. Due to its dimensions, this line is only visible from the sky. Zurita was awarded the Chilean National Prize of Literature and a scholarship from the Guggenheim Foundation. He has been conferred two Doctor honoris causa degrees and is Professor emeritus at the Universidad Diego Portales.

 

Lunch Brown Bag Conversation in Spanish with the Poet

TUESDAY SEPT 26 at 12:00pm to 1:30am
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Lease Crutcher Lewis Room 023
1395 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403

POETRY Reading (in SPANISH)
WEDNESDAY SEPT 27 4pm-5:30pm
Browsing Room, Knight Library
(Q/A in Spanish and English)

The generous support of the College of Arts and Sciences Program Grant, the Oregon Humanities Center, the Translation Studies Working Group, Romance Languages, Comparative Literature, Latin American Studies, and the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS) makes this event possible. These events are free and open to the public.

 

Contact Prof. Cecilia Enjuto Rangel (enjuto@uoregon.edu) for a reservatiofor the Q/A session. We will meet at noon, so if you want to bring a brown bag lunch, you can.

January 19, 2016

Jesús Sepúlveda reads at International Festival in Bali, Indonesia

Chilean poet Jesús Sepúlveda and Balinese poet Samar Gantang

Chilean poet Jesús Sepúlveda and Balinese poet Samar Gantang

Between November 26th and December 1st 2015, ten poets were invited to participate in the Tabanan International Poetry Festival in Bali, Indonesia. Poet and Senior Instructor of Spanish Composition, Creative Writing and Poetry, Jesús Sepúlveda, was one of them. During the festival poets from four continents met and discussed issues related to poetry and their distinctive poetic traditions while performing poetry readings in their original languages with simultaneous translation into Indonesian for a Balinese audience composed of community members, students, poets, and occasional passers-by.

The Grand Opening of the event consisted in a procession through the streets of Denpasar—Bali’s capital—where poets paraded, carrying a banner with the pictures of all poets. A band that played Gamelan Balinese traditional music accompanied the poets while police stopped traffic and escorted the group of poets and musicians to the main stage. People assembled on sidewalks cheering the poets while giant posters announcing the festival were hanging from buildings and homes. At the end of the day, German poet Michael Augustin wrote: “poetry can stop cars!”

Sepúlveda had the opportunity to meet renowned Javanese poet and feminist scholar, Toedi Heraty, who invited the group to celebrate her 82th birthday at one of her beautiful homes. He also met the national Balinese poet and shaman, Samar Gantang, whose epic poems are rooted in Balinese culture and are performed with Gamelan music and masked dancers interpreting the different characters and scenes of the poems. This style of performative poetry is already a poetic school in Bali and Samar Gantang’s reputation is vibrant and emulated by Balinese youth.

Poets Muhammad Salleh, Vonani Bila, Aurélia Lassaque, Jesús Sepúlveda, and Michael Augustin

Poets Muhammad Salleh, Vonani Bila, Aurélia Lassaque, Jesús Sepúlveda, and Michael Augustin

Another highlight of the week was the poetry readings at the 16th century Tanah Lot Temple in the Wantilan area. Once there, and before the reading and the spectacular sunset over the Indian Ocean, poets were asked to sign their names on separate plaques, so they could be engraved in a holy rock placed in the garden of the Hindu temple. Organizers and authorities envisioned this tribute as an opportunity for future visitors to admire the calligraphy of poet’s signatures melted into the beauty of the landscape and the sacred atmosphere of the place.

During the festival poets also visited schools, experienced Balinese culture and cuisine, and trekked the rice paddies of beautiful, utopian, and green land surrounding Jatiluwih village in the plateau of Watukaru Mount—one of the most iconic and traditional areas in Bali.   In this excursion, poets learned about the ecologically sustainable irrigation system of canals and weirs called Subak that dates back to the 9th century while drinking red rice tea and eating fresh fruit from the organic gardens.

Poets also taught and learned from each other, expanding their expertise and poetic craft while creating an international network of poetry. Malaysian poet Muhammad Salleh shared with his fellow poets the tradition of Pantun—a Malay literary form from 15th century—while Indian poet Sujata Bhatt read her intimate poetry about her displacements and reminiscences of her mother tongue. Mozambique-born poet and professor Lucas Mkuti presented an anthology of poetry from around the world Sweep of the Violin, whose title comes from a poem by Javanese poet and festival organizer, Dorothea Rosa Herliany. The whole group traveled throughout the island in a van driven “Balinese style,” visiting cultural sites and talking in Balinese, Indonesian, Malay, English, German, French, Portuguese, Italian, and Spanish.

Poet Jesús Sepúlveda reading at the Tabanan main square

Poet Jesús Sepúlveda reading at the Tabanan main square

On the last night, five poets read their work at the main Tabanan plaza, Alit Saputra, in front of 15,000 people in the context of the city’s celebration of its 522 years. South African poet Vonani Bila, German poet Bastian Boettcher, French poet Aurélia Lassaque, Balinese poet Samar Gantang, and Chilean poet Jesús Sepúlveda read their poetry on the main stage, while a giant screen showed their readings to the public and the cameras televised the event live on Indonesian national TV.   This was certainly a climactic ending to the festival, which remained in the national and local news even days after poets returned home.

For more information, see tabananpoetry.com or google Tabanan International Poetry Festival.

February 19, 2014

Sepúlveda reads from new books in tour of Chile

Sepulveda-ValparaisoSenior Instructor Jesús Sepúlveda traveled to his native Chile in December to present his most recent book of poetry, Poemas de un bárbaro (Santiago de Chile: Contragolpe Ediciones, 2013)—a 261-page anthology of his selected poems that covers almost 30 years of writing.  He toured Santiago, Valparaíso, and La Serena to do poetry readings and talk to writers and the general public.  He also presented his new book of aphorisms, Antiegótico (Viña del Mar: Nihil Obstat, 2013), and the reprint of the Chilean edition of his eco-anarchist essay El jardín de las peculiarides (Olmué: Nihil Obstat, 2011)—the second French edition of this essay was also reprinted last year in Paris by Aux Forges du Vulcain.

Sepulveda-La SerenaIn January, he delivered a paper “El rito del viaje: Artaud y los tarahumaras” during the “VII International and Interdisciplinary Conference Alexander von Humboldt, Claudio Gay, and Ignacio Domeyko” at the University of Chile, where many scholars from the US, Latin America, and Europe participated.  This paper is part of a larger project called Intoxicated Texts.

November 5, 2012

García Caro interviews Chilean author Roberto Brodksy

Assistant Professor of Spanish Pedro García-Caro, together with Lisa DiGiovanni (Indiana State University and  RL PhD 2008) published “The Uncertain Territory of Memory: A Conversation with Chilean Author Roberto Brodksy” in World Literature Today (September 2012) [full text online].

From the article:

Roberto Brodsky (b. 1957) came of age in Santiago de Chile during the revolutionary years of Salvador Allende’s Popular Unity government (1970–73). Born to Ukrainian Jewish immigrants that escaped the pogroms during the first decades of the century, Brodsky grew up immersed in leftist politics and culture. During the Popular Unity he was a young militant in the FER (Frente de Estudiantes Revolucionarios). In 1973 the right-wing military coup divided his family, forcing them into exile in Venezuela, Argentina, and Spain. After his return to Chile in the early 1980s, he worked as a journalist and playwright and became involved in clandestine oppositional press networks.

Roberto Brodksy



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