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Posts under tag: Cecilia Enjuto-Rangel

October 19, 2017

Toño Martorell, Puerto Rican Artist Visits UO

Conversation (Q/A) with Puerto Rican artist Antonio Martorell on OCT 19 from 12pm-1:30pm at Crater Lake North EMU 146.

Please, sign up for this conversation (Q/A) by sending Cecilia Enjuto Rangel an email at enjuto@uoregon.edu. There is a limited space in this event and we want to know how many students, faculty members and members of the community are able to attend. Everyone is invited, please spread the word.

We also want to invite you attend his public lecture (free and open to everyone):

“Communication, Communion, and Confrontation in

Puerto Rican Art” by Antonio Martorell, Puerto Rican artist at

JSMA

Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

Ford Lecture Hall

THURSDAY | OCTOBER 19 | 4 PM

Sponsored by: Teaching Engagement Program:

Community Engagement Grant

Co-Sponsored by: Oregon Humanities Center, Latin

American Studies, Division of Equity and Inclusion,

Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, Romance Languages,

and Center for Latino/a & Latin American Studies.

Antonio Martorell is a visting artist at Linfield College. His exhibition,

“Rain/Lluvia” can be seen at the Linfield Art Gallery, opening October 16 and

continuing through November 18. It is his first exhibition in the Pacific NW.

September 19, 2017

Sept 26-27: Chilean poet, Raúl ZURITA at UO

RAÚL ZURITA (1950) is one of Latin America’s most celebrated poets. His works include Purgatorio (1979), Anteparaíso (1982), Canto a su amor desaparecido (1985), La Vida Nueva (1994), INRI (2003) and Zurita (2011). Through his writings, Zurita chronicles the violent history of Chile’s military dictatorship as well as that of the Americas since the conquest. In 1979, along with other artists, he founded CADA, Colectivo de Acciones de Arte, an art action group dedicated to the creation of political art that would resist the military regime. In 1982, he composed a poem in the sky over New York, and in 1993 he bulldozed “ni pena ni miedo” (no pain no fear) into the coarse sands of the Desert of Atacama. Due to its dimensions, this line is only visible from the sky. Zurita was awarded the Chilean National Prize of Literature and a scholarship from the Guggenheim Foundation. He has been conferred two Doctor honoris causa degrees and is Professor emeritus at the Universidad Diego Portales.

 

Lunch Brown Bag Conversation in Spanish with the Poet

TUESDAY SEPT 26 at 12:00pm to 1:30am
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Lease Crutcher Lewis Room 023
1395 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403

POETRY Reading (in SPANISH)
WEDNESDAY SEPT 27 4pm-5:30pm
Browsing Room, Knight Library
(Q/A in Spanish and English)

The generous support of the College of Arts and Sciences Program Grant, the Oregon Humanities Center, the Translation Studies Working Group, Romance Languages, Comparative Literature, Latin American Studies, and the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS) makes this event possible. These events are free and open to the public.

 

Contact Prof. Cecilia Enjuto Rangel (enjuto@uoregon.edu) for a reservatiofor the Q/A session. We will meet at noon, so if you want to bring a brown bag lunch, you can.

February 11, 2016

Mariko Plescia Makes a Short Film about Interning for the 2015 EDOC Film Festival

“What do we value more: our commitment to justice or our fear of the law?”

NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden posed this question to a full house the opening night of the 2015 EDOC (“Encuentros del Otro Cine”) Film Festival in Quito, Ecuador. May 21st at roughly 7 p.m. in Quito, 3 a.m. in Moscow, Snowden joined the festival via videoconference to discuss Laura Poitras’ film Citizenfour (2014). For Romance Languages graduate student Mariko Plescia (RL PhD ABD), who interned with the festival during the 2014-2015 academic year, this moment represented not only the culmination of much collaboration to secure the meeting with Snowden, but also a link between her research on Latin American documentary film and compelling contemporary politics.

Snowden joined the film festival EDOC 2015 via videoconference.

Snowden joined the film festival EDOC 2015 via videoconference.

 

After defending the prospectus of her dissertation, “The Politics and Poetics of Time in Contemporary Latin American Documentary Film,” Mariko wanted a way to gain professional experience in the film industry while also continuing her research. So, she contacted Cinememoria, the nonprofit cultural organization that hosts the EDOC film festival, and proposed a collaboration. With the support of her advisor Cecilia Enjuto Rangel (Romance Languages) and professor Gabriela Martínez (Journalism, Cinema Studies), Mariko was awarded the Dixon Graduate Innovation Award in order to pursue this year abroad.

From October through the culmination of the festival in June, Mariko participated in the day to day building of the festival’s XIV edition. As part of the programming team, she worked with directors and distribution companies in the process of incorporating films in the festival. Among other highlights were working in the video archives and collaborating with Manolo Sarmiento (Cinememoria, executive director) on a grant proposal for the EDOC Online Film Archive Platform, a project for which the UO Digital Scholarship Center provided significant guidance.

Mariko at the film festival inaugural ceremony.

Mariko at the film festival inaugural ceremony.

Mariko explains that working for the festival opened her eyes to the tense balance between the routine tasks and the decisive taking of political sides that go into crafting a cultural event like EDOC. True to the 2015 festival slogan, “Ver la realidad te cambia,” Mariko describes the festival program as impacting. The lineup revealed global instability, a sort of “champú caótico,” as the festival director describes: from Citizenfour and the Snowden revelations to We Come as Friends and neocolonialism in South Sudan, the films expose an entangled battlefield of global powers. Sarmiento states, “estamos saliendo de la hegemonía americana ya desde hace bastantes años y todavía no está claro quién va a ser el nuevo hegemónico, tal vez no lo haya . . .” (February, 2015).

On a note that dialogues with Mariko’s examination of ethics and time in Latin American documentary films, during the opening ceremony Snowden thanked Poitras and documentary filmmakers around the world, explaining, “we have a better world because of the work you do.” He also mentioned that he feels a “special fondness” for Latin America because it is one of the first regions “to stand up and say no, things have to change.” According to Mariko, Snowden’s audience was attentive and excited, abuzz with the significance of this conversation at both a national level and worldwide. Other memorable aspects of the festival included a master class with directors Alan Berliner and Hubert Sauper, leading Q/A sessions with directors Berliner, Firouzeh Khosrovani, and Mateo Herrera, and writing for the festival catalog and periodical.

Mariko Plescia interviewing Firouzeh Khosrovani at EDOC 2015 film festival.

Mariko Plescia interviewing Firouzeh Khosrovani at EDOC 2015 film festival.

Pulling together the festival experience with her research on Latin American documentary film, Mariko made a short film (El otro cine) about EDOC and its historical impact on the audiovisual field in Ecuador. Along with a small cinematic crew, she interviewed the founding members of Cinememoria, filmmakers, fans, and public functionaries in the cultural sector, including the director of Ecuadorian National Cinema Council and the rector of the National University of the Arts, Guayaquil. These conversations allowed Mariko to address her burning questions to the filmmakers and to better understand how the industry (from funding to distribution) contributes to the meaning of the films. El otro cine was shown as part of the UO, Oregon State and Portland State University Cine-Lit VIII International Conference on Hispanic Film and Fiction in February, 2014.

Back at UO, Mariko is busy integrating this rich period of research into her dissertation writing and looks forward to sharing her reflections on two Ecuadorian films at the American Comparative Literature Association 2016 Conference. She also continues to edit the interview material for a short video to incorporate in Spanish and Latin American Cinema classes here at the University of Oregon. Mariko says that after seeing Citizenfour she is more conscious of what she types into the google search engine; but thanks to Snowden and brave filmmakers like those represented at EDOC14, she is also more motivated to develop a strong critical voice through her work as a UO graduate student.

Inaugural ceremony of EDOC 2015 film festival.

Inaugural ceremony of EDOC 2015 film festival.

May 29, 2014

Cecilia Enjuto Rangel Receives Excellence Award

Cecilia Enjuto Rangel, Associate Professor of Spanish in the Romance Languages department, has been awarded Excellence Award for Outstanding Mentorship in Graduate Studies this year.

Enjuto Rangel consistently supports not only her advisees, but all Romance Languages and Comparative Literature students by putting important scholarship, grant, and internship opportunties within reach. Additionally, Enjuto Rangel has provided unique mentorship opportunities by bringing academic and artistic events to campus that keep graduate students up-to-date on scholarly advances and to meet influential academics and artists in the field.

A common theme in Enjuto Rangel’s nominations was her generosity with her time. “We want to emphsize that Prof. Enjuto Rangel has markedly influenced our graduate study experience by giving a very precious and scarce gift among professors: time,” her nomination wrote.

October 30, 2013

Iberian and Latin American Transatlantic Studies Symposium Nov 1st & 2nd

Please join us on Friday Nov. 1 (9:30am-5:15pm at the Knight Browsing Rm) and Saturday Nov. 2 (10am-5pm Jaqua Auditorium) for the Iberian and Latin American Transatlantic Studies symposium.  The symposium will feature 16 scholars, from all over the US and the UK, who will present their work on topics ranging from Transatlantic Memories and Displacements to Methodologies and Postcolonial Relations. The event is free and open to students, faculty, and members of the community.

You can view the abstracts and bios of all of the speakers on the Transatlantic Symposium Website: jsma.uoregon.edu/TransatlanticismSymposium

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The symposium is sponsored by the Department of Romance Languages; the Center for the Study of Women in Society; the Women of Color Project; the Center for Latino, Latina & Latin American Studies; the Latin American Studies Program; the European Studies Program; a Hispanex Grant from the Spanish Ministry of Education, Culture, and Sports; and the Idea Award from the Office of Research, Innovation, and Graduate Education at the University of Oregon. I also want to add a special thanks to the Oregon Humanities Center for their support of the event. The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art Academic Support Grant also sponsored our symposium and related exhibition called Transatlanticisms.

November 16, 2010

Enjuto Rangel publishes book on the poetry of ruins in modernity

CitiesWhy and how do ruins serve as metaphors for the poetic critique of modernity, the past and the present? In her new book Cities in Ruins: The Politics of Modern Poetics (Purdue University Press, 2010), Assistant Professor of Spanish Cecilia Enjuto Rangel explains how poets like Charles Baudelaire, Luis Cernuda, T.S. Eliot, Octavio Paz and Pablo Neruda uncover ruins to reread and rewrite their own historical and literary traditions. For Enjuto-Rangel, poetry about ruins is part of the modern critique of progress, of modernization, and of the brutality of war. The topic of the contemplation of the ruins has roots in the Classics, and is seen time again during the Baroque and Romantic periods, both in Europe and Latin America. Cities in Ruins, however, is the first serious study of modern ruins in modern poetry.

In Cities in Ruins, Enjuto Rangel shows how unlike their Romantic predecessors, who tended toward melancholic representations of the past, modern poems historicize ruins, avoiding a narcissistic reading of destruction. This “awakening” to history can also be tainted by urban traumatic experiences and the marginalization of both material and human ruins from the modern city.

Enjuto Rangel

Cities in Ruins contributes to the redefinition of the field of Transatlantic Studies, and focuses on the particular and crucial role of poetry as a genre that allows for the questioning of nationalistic boundaries. Accordingly, Enjuto Rangel’s book looks at poets from Spain, Latin America, France, and England.




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