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Spanish Course Descriptions: 2018/2019

**TENTATIVE COURSE OFFERINGS, SUBJECT TO CHANGE**

101 = course being offered (bold & underline)

 = counts toward ‘expertise’ requirement for MINOR only
 = counts toward ‘expertise’ requirement for MAJOR and MINOR

Course Catalog  Fall 2018  Winter 2019 Spring 2019 Min  Maj
101, 102, 103 101 102 103
111, 112 111 112
150, 151
199
201, 202, 203 201 202 203
218, 228 218 218, 228 228
238, 248
301 301 301 301
303 303 303 303
305 305 305 305
307 307 307 307
308 308 308 308
311 311 311 311
312 312 312 312
315
320 320 320 320
322 322 322 322
324 324 324 324
341  
342 342 342 342  
343 343 343 343  
344 344 344 344  
348 348 348 348 ♦ 
350 ♦ 
351 351 351 ♦ 
353 353 353 ♦ 
399 399 399 399
407, 407/507 407 407 ♦ 
410 410 410 410 ♦ 
420, 420/520 420/520 ♦ 
424, 424/524 424/524 ♦ 
425, 425/525 425 ♦ 
428, 428/528 428 ♦ 
436 ♦ 
437, 437/537 ♦ 
448, 448/548 448/548 448/548 ♦ 
450, 450/550 450/550 ♦ 
451, 451/551 451/551 ♦ 
452, 452/552 ♦ 
460 ♦ 
466, 466/566 ♦ 
480, 480/580 480/580 ♦ 
490, 490/590 490 490, 490/590 490 ♦ 
607 607
680 680
690

 

 = counts toward ‘expertise’ requirement for MINOR only
 = counts toward ‘expertise’ requirement for MAJOR and MINOR

*****NOTE ABOUT SPAN 320: INTENSIVE GRAMMAR REVIEW:
During registration, SPAN 320 carries a restriction limiting the course to students who are Spanish Language and Society majors. This restriction remains in effect during for the first two weeks of registration. After that time, Spanish minors and other students will be able to register for any remaining spots.


FALL 2018

SPAN 101: First-Year Spanish- Various
Emphasis on the development of speaking, reading, and writing skills; introduction to Hispanic culture. Sequence. Conducted in Spanish. 

SPAN 201: Second-Year Spanish- Various
Continued development of Spanish-language skills; emphasis on diversity of Hispanic cultures. Sequence. Conducted in Spanish. 

SPAN 218: Latino Heritage I
Intermediate Spanish course designed specifically for Heritage learners of Spanish. This class allows students to explore important cultural production from the Spanish-speaking world, with a focus on Latino culture in the U.S., while building their communicative skills in Spanish. This course cannot be combined with SPAN 201, 202, 203 for more than 15 credits of second-year Spanish. Course taught in Spanish and Spanglish.  See SHL page for more details. 

SPAN 301: Cultura y lengua: identidades hispanas
Develops advanced language skills through analysis of major historical influences in the cultures of Spanish-speaking regions: Spain, Latin America, and the United States. 

SPAN 303: Cultura y lengua: expresiones artísticas
Develops advanced language skills through the study of cultural products (e.g., art, literature, film, music) in Spanish-speaking societies. 

SPAN 305: Cultura y lengua: cambios sociales
Develops advanced language skills through the investigation of major currents of change in modern Spanish-speaking societies; gender issues, technology, revolution and counterrevolution. 

SPAN 307: Oral Skills- Various
In this course, students who have completed at least two years of Spanish work on building vocabulary, practicing verbal forms in conversational context, perfecting grammatical structures and pronunciation, and developing complex ideas in discussion, debate, and presentation formats. Prerequisite: two years of Spanish (or placement into third-year Spanish). 2.0 credits.  

SPAN 308: Comunidades Bilingues
Develops advanced language skills through the analysis of social and linguistic dynamics of communities in Spain, Latin America, and the United States where Spanish encounters another language. Taught in Spanish. Sequence with SPAN 301, 303, 305. 

SPAN 311: Advanced Writing in Spanish
Provides additional language development for students, emphasizing academic writing skills in Spanish. Prereq: Any two of SPAN 301, 303, or 305. 

SPAN 312: Spanish in the Media- Rothgery
Designed for heritage learners. Examines the role of Spanish in various forms of media such as television, Internet, and literature. Students practice advanced writing skills necessary to participate in argumentative writing and close textual readings. Prereq: any two from SPAN 301, 303, 305 or 308; SPAN 308 is recommended.   

SPAN 320: Intensive Spanish Grammar Review
Review and development of the more complex aspects of Spanish grammar with special attention to idiomatic usage.
***During registration, SPAN 320 carries a restriction limiting the course to students who are Spanish Language and Society majors. This restriction remains in effect during for the first two weeks of registration. After that time, Spanish minors and other students will be able to register for any remaining spots.

SPAN 322: Introduction to Spanish Linguistics
The course content focuses on the analysis of the basic linguistic characteristics of the Spanish language. It introduces students to the study of the Spanish sound system (phonetics and phonology), formation of words (morphology), sentence structure (syntax), as well as the evolution of the different Spanish varieties (historic, regional, and social). This class will prepare students for higher-level courses in Hispanic linguistics and others in which Spanish is used in formal academic contexts. 

SPAN 324: Spanish Pronunciation and Phonetics
Study of Spanish sounds, rhythms, and intonation; supervised pronunciation practice. 

SPAN 342: Hispanic Cultures through Literature II- Garcia-Pabon
Introduces students to a variety of texts written in the Hispanic world in their literary, artistic, and historical contexts, from the 16th century to the Latin American independences. Sequence with SPAN 341, 343, 344. Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308. Approved to satisfy Category I-Arts and Letters general-education group requirement. Approved to satisfy Category B: international cultures multicultural requirement.  

SPAN 343: Hispanic Cultures through Literature III- Various
This class introduces students to a variety of literary works from Latin American Independences to the Spanish Civil War, with emphasis on their relationship to historical events and critical representation of Iberian and Latin American societies.

The “long nineteenth century” is the century of crisis, flanked by revolutions, transformations and wars. We will cover from the Wars of Independence in Latin America and the Napoleonic Wars in the Iberian Peninsula to the Spanish Civil War. We will study changes in the key concepts that articulate 19th and early 20th century debates in a Transatlantic framework, without losing sight of the intellectual context that runs parallel to the changes in these concepts: revolution and freedom, nation building and subject formation, civilization, progress, national identity, democracy, modernity, modernization. Among other topics, we will trace by analyzing short stories, poems, plays, and other cultural products: the colonial legacy in the hegemonic nation building projects of the intellectual liberal elites; the conflict between lettered elites and popular masses; bourgeois revolutions; imperial nostalgia for the lost colonies; building of national identity in Spain; the inextricability of fiction from politics; aesthetic innovations at the brink of the Spanish civil war.

SPAN 344: Hispanic Cultures through Literature IV- Various
Introduces students to a variety of texts written in the Hispanic world in their literary, artistic, and historical contexts, from the 20th century into the 21st. Sequence with SPAN 341, 342, 343. Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308. Approved to satisfy Category I-Arts and Letters general-education group requirement. Approved to satisfy Category B: international cultures multicultural requirement. 

SPAN 348: US Latino Literature and Culture- Taylor
This course is an introduction to literature by Hispanic writers in the United States. Students
will read a range of literary genres from colonial times as well as 19th and 20th century Hispanic authors to
address relevant literary, cultural and social themes in class discussion and writing
assignments. Topics studied include: borderlands, US-Latin
American relations, the politics of language, Chicano/Latino identities, Chicana/Latina
feminism, migration and exile, and popular culture. Students are expected to read, discuss,
and write in Spanish, although course material varies in linguistic registers (Spanish,
English, Spanglish, Caló, etc.). This course satisfies the “American Cultures” category for
the UO Multicultural Requirement.

SPAN 351: Introduction to Theater- Gladhart
Explores important aspects of Spanish theater; reading plays from different periods of
Spanish and Spanish American literature. Emphasizes formal aspects and critical reading.
Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308.

SPAN 353: Intro to Narrative- Millar
Explores important aspects of Spanish narrative; reading texts from different periods of Spanish and Spanish American literature. Emphasizes formal aspects and critical reading.  

SPAN 399: Los latinos y la educación- Latinos and Education- Costales
This course will provide a critical analysis of the social, political, economic and cultural
factors surrounding the educational experience of Latinos in the United States, and their
manifestation in cultural production (murals, poetry, music, film, memoir, etc). Develops
advanced language skills as well as awareness of linguistic variation in the field.

SPAN 410: Escritura creativa en lengua castellana / Creative Writing in Spanish- Sepulveda
Este curso busca potenciar las capacidades creativas de los estudiantes de castellano a través de variados ejercicios de escritura. Durante el trimestre el alumno desarrollará su sensibilidad literaria así como también su juicio crítico e interpretativo mediante sesiones de taller y de discusión grupal. Se espera que el alumno escriba poemas, cuentos y, posiblemente, capítulos de algún proyecto mayor de ficción literaria según sea su interés. También será pertinente escribir guiones y textos creativos híbridos en caso de que el alumno tenga interés en ello. Realizaremos ejercicios de escritura dirigida y leeremos textos ad hoc a los proyectos individuales de escritura. Al término del curso, el alumno deberá presentar como proyecto final un conjunto de escritos creativos que den cuenta de su trabajo en clase, incluyendo borradores y correcciones. La última sesión de clase será una presentación pública del proyecto final dirigida a la comunidad universitaria.  

SPAN 450/550: Andean Baroque- Garcia-Pabon
Course description TBA

SPAN 490: Meso-American Foodways- Taylor
Course description TBA

 


WINTER 2019

SPAN 102: First-Year Spanish- Various
Emphasis on the development of speaking, reading, and writing skills; introduction to Hispanic culture. Sequence. Conducted in Spanish. 

SPAN 111: Intensive Beginning Spanish
Intensive study for experienced language learners (ex: took Spanish in high school).
Introduction to Hispanic culture. Prereq for 111: previous study of Spanish or competence in
another language.

SPAN 202: Second-Year Spanish- Various
Continued development of Spanish-language skills; emphasis on diversity of Hispanic cultures. Sequence. Conducted in Spanish. 

SPAN 218: Latino Heritage I- Quarles
Intermediate Spanish course designed specifically for Heritage learners of Spanish. This class allows students to explore important cultural production from the Spanish-speaking world, with a focus on Latino culture in the U.S., while building their communicative skills in Spanish. This course cannot be combined with SPAN 201, 202, 203 for more than 15 credits of second-year Spanish. Course taught in Spanish and Spanglish.  See SHL page for more details.

SPAN 228 Latino Heritage II- Costales
Intermediate-level oral skills and academic Spanish development for heritage language
learners of Spanish. Helps students establish a personal connection between their Spanish
language heritage and the wider Spanish-speaking world. Course taught in Spanish and
Spanglish. See SHL page for more details.

SPAN 301: Cultura y lengua: identidades hispanas- Various
Develops advanced language skills through analysis of major historical influences in the cultures of Spanish-speaking regions: Spain, Latin America, and the United States. 

SPAN 303: Cultura y lengua: expresiones artísticas- Various
Develops advanced language skills through the study of cultural products (e.g., art, literature, film, music) in Spanish-speaking societies. 

SPAN 305: Cultura y lengua: cambios sociales- Various
Develops advanced language skills through the investigation of major currents of change in modern Spanish-speaking societies; gender issues, technology, revolution and counterrevolution. 

SPAN 307: Oral Skills- Various
In this course, students who have completed at least two years of Spanish work on building vocabulary, practicing verbal forms in conversational context, perfecting grammatical structures and pronunciation, and developing complex ideas in discussion, debate, and presentation formats. Prerequisite: two years of Spanish (or placement into third-year Spanish). 2.0 credits.  

SPAN 308: Comunidades Bilingues- Various
Develops advanced language skills through the analysis of social and linguistic dynamics of communities in Spain, Latin America, and the United States where Spanish encounters another language. Taught in Spanish. Sequence with SPAN 301, 303, 305. 

SPAN 311: Advanced Writing in Spanish- Sepulveda
Provides additional language development for students, emphasizing academic writing skills in Spanish. Prereq: Any two of SPAN 301, 303, or 305. 

SPAN 312: Spanish in the Media- Zunterstein
Designed for heritage learners. Examines the role of Spanish in various forms of media such as television, Internet, and literature. Students practice advanced writing skills necessary to participate in argumentative writing and close textual readings. Prereq: any two from SPAN 301, 303, 305 or 308; SPAN 308 is recommended.   

SPAN 320: Intensive Spanish Grammar Review- Various
Review and development of the more complex aspects of Spanish grammar with special attention to idiomatic usage.
***During registration, SPAN 320 carries a restriction limiting the course to students who are Spanish Language and Society majors. This restriction remains in effect during for the first two weeks of registration. After that time, Spanish minors and other students will be able to register for any remaining spots.

SPAN 322: Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics- Grammon, Otero
The course content focuses on the analysis of the basic linguistic characteristics of the
Spanish language. It introduces students to the study of the Spanish sound system
(phonetics and phonology), formation of words (morphology), sentence structure (syntax),
as well as the evolution of the different Spanish varieties (historic, regional, and social). This
class will prepare students for higher-level courses in Hispanic linguistics and others in
which Spanish is used in formal academic contexts. ↑

SPAN 324: Spanish Pronunciation and Phonetics- Grammon, Otero
Study of Spanish sounds, rhythms, and intonation; supervised pronunciation practice.

SPAN 342: Hispanic Cultures through Literature II- Garcia-Pabon
Introduces students to a variety of texts written in the Hispanic world in their literary, artistic,
and historical contexts, from the 16th century to the Latin American independences.
Sequence with SPAN 341, 343, 344. Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308. Approved
to satisfy Category I-Arts and Letters general-education group requirement. Approved to
satisfy Category B: international cultures multicultural requirement.

SPAN 343: Hispanic Cultures through Literature III- Enjuto Rangel
Introduces students to a variety of texts written in the Hispanic world in their literary, artistic,
and historical contexts, from the revolutionary wars to the Spanish Civil War. Sequence with
SPAN 341, 342, 344. Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308. Approved to satisfy
Category I-Arts and Letters general-education group requirement. Approved to satisfy
Category B: international cultures multicultural requirement.

SPAN 344: Hispanic Cultures through Literature IV- Millar, Garcia-Caro
Introduces students to a variety of texts written in the Hispanic world in their literary, artistic,
and historical contexts, from the 20th century into the 21st. Sequence with SPAN 341, 342,
343. Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308. Approved to satisfy Category I-Arts and
Letters general-education group requirement. Approved to satisfy Category B: international
cultures multicultural requirement.

SPAN 348: United States Latino Literature and Culture- Taylor
Introduction to Hispanic literature written in the United States. Close reading and discussion
of selected texts by Hispanic authors; emphasis on literary trends and themes.

SPAN 351: Introduction to Theater- Gladhart
Explores important aspects of Spanish theater; reading plays from different periods of
Spanish and Spanish American literature. Emphasizes formal aspects and critical reading.
Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308.

SPAN 353: Introduction to Narrative- Bottaro
Explores important aspects of Spanish narrative; reading texts from different periods of
Spanish and Spanish American literature. Emphasizes formal aspects and critical
reading.

SPAN 399: Spanish for Business- Lara
This course is designed to provide students with opportunities for successful communication
in the Spanish-speaking business world by building on their existing knowledge of Spanish.
It is intended for students wishing to practice real-life applications of typical business
communications, in Spanish, in order to improve fluency in listening, speaking, reading, and
writing. Students will participate in activities that develop critical thinking and highlight cross-
cultural sensitivity relevant to Hispanic business, finance, and marketing within the context
of global markets.

SPAN 410: Escritura creativa en lengua castellana / Creative Writing in Spanish- Sepulveda
Este curso busca potenciar las capacidades creativas de los estudiantes de castellano a través de variados ejercicios de escritura. Durante el trimestre el alumno desarrollará su sensibilidad literaria así como también su juicio crítico e interpretativo mediante sesiones de taller y de discusión grupal. Se espera que el alumno escriba poemas, cuentos y, posiblemente, capítulos de algún proyecto mayor de ficción literaria según sea su interés. También será pertinente escribir guiones y textos creativos híbridos en caso de que el alumno tenga interés en ello. Realizaremos ejercicios de escritura dirigida y leeremos textos ad hoc a los proyectos individuales de escritura. Al término del curso, el alumno deberá presentar como proyecto final un conjunto de escritos creativos que den cuenta de su trabajo en clase, incluyendo borradores y correcciones. La última sesión de clase será una presentación pública del proyecto final dirigida a la comunidad universitaria.

SPAN 425: Literary Translation- Gladhart
We begin with the premise that the practices and theories of literary translation are
profoundly interconnected and can most productively be explored together. Practicing (and
thinking about) translation gives us insight into the complexities of reading and of studying
multiple languages. Translation also engages the promises of and obstacles to crosscultural
communication and understanding. This seminar-workshop gives practical
experience in literary translation, through shared exercises and individual projects. The
work for this course will include analysis of selected literary texts alongside their
translations; critical readings of translators’ introductions and notes; and readings of texts in
translation history and theory. We will examine various approaches to issues including
linguistic similarity and dissimilarity; translation as close critical reading; questions of
narrative and poetic translation; the translation of gender, social class, and political
geography; and the creative uses writers and poets have made of translation.

SPAN 428: Spanish in the US- Grammon
This course provides the background knowledge and analytical tools to critically explore the
use of the Spanish language, its linguistic characteristics, and narratives about its use within
the United States. The goals of this course include the assessment of language
stereotypes, common beliefs, and media discourses, as well as one’s own positioning on
the borderlands.

Spanish 448 Puerto Rico and its Diaspora- Enjuto Rangel
In this course we will study the construction of national identity in Puerto Rico and in the Latinx/Puerto Rican community in the US. Our exciting approach to rethinking Puerto Rico as a “cultura fronteriza” and our study of its national identity will be interdisciplinary in nature. We will study Puerto Rico from fields such as History, Politics, Sociology, Philosophy, Sociolinguistics, Music, Art, Architecture, Food, and Literature. We will bring speakers from these diverse fields into our classroom through skype interviews and as invited lecturers. How do language dynamics shape visions of national identity? How does the use of Spanish and/or Spanglish also determine our conceptualization of Puerto Rican identity in the island and in the United States? Since Puerto Rico became territory of the US in 1898, its neocolonial political state defines how languages such as Spanish and English are taught, and spoken. Through essays, articles, images, documentaries, music, art pieces, a play, short stories and poetry we will study how the social dynamics surrounding Spanish (and English and Spanglish) change over time. We will also learn about Hurricane María, Puerto Rico’s current financial crisis and how Puerto Ricans are responding to both in the island and in the US.

SPAN 490: Latin American Dictator Novels- Millar
En este curso, examinaremos el fenómeno literario de la “novela de dictadura” en América Latina. Nuestro enfoque será tres novelas de la segunda mitad del siglo XX, aunque discutiremos los orígenes de este género literario en el siglo XIX y principios del siglo XX. Nuestro análisis se tratará de los contextos culturales e históricos de las obras literarias y prestaremos atención especial a las cuestiones formales y éticas que introduce el uso de la ficción narrativa y la novela como género literario como espacio de debate sobre dictadores y sistemas autoritarios. Por ejemplo, ¿por qué y cómo llega a ser la novela un tipo de repositorio para archivar y debatir historias y experiencias con dictadura? ¿Cómo interpretamos el uso de técnicas como la exageración, la parodia, el anacronismo y otras técnicas no realistas? ¿Cómo podemos leer y escribir sobre la dictadura éticamente?

SPAN 424/524 History of Spanish Language- Davis
This course examines the linguistic and historic development of the Spanish language.
Students will study the linguistic factors and the historic periods that determined the
formation of Spanish as a romance language and its dissemination into the Americas. The
course will cover the diachronic development of phonological and morphological features
from Latin to Spanish. The study of historic periods will review from pre-Roman times to
fifteen hundreds in the Iberian Peninsula and the colonial period in Latin America. Prerequisites:
any two of SPAN 320, 322, 324. For MA Students: This course may count
for M.A. Periods 1, 2, 3 or 4 depending on the topic of the final research project.

Spanish 448/548 Puerto Rico and its Diaspora- Enjuto Rangel
In this course we will study the construction of national identity in Puerto Rico and in the Latinx/Puerto Rican community in the US. Our exciting approach to rethinking Puerto Rico as a “cultura fronteriza” and our study of its national identity will be interdisciplinary in nature. We will study Puerto Rico from fields such as History, Politics, Sociology, Philosophy, Sociolinguistics, Music, Art, Architecture, Food, and Literature. We will bring speakers from these diverse fields into our classroom through skype interviews and as invited lecturers. How do language dynamics shape visions of national identity? How does the use of Spanish and/or Spanglish also determine our conceptualization of Puerto Rican identity in the island and in the United States? Since Puerto Rico became territory of the US in 1898, its neocolonial political state defines how languages such as Spanish and English are taught, and spoken. Through essays, articles, images, documentaries, music, art pieces, a play, short stories and poetry we will study how the social dynamics surrounding Spanish (and English and Spanglish) change over time. We will also learn about Hurricane María, Puerto Rico’s current financial crisis and how Puerto Ricans are responding to both in the island and in the US. (MA Period 3 and 4)

SPAN 490/590: The Idea of Latin America- Garcia-Caro
Course description TBA

SPAN 607: Don Quixote- Middlebrook
This seminar centers on a close, careful reading of Don Quijote, Part 2 (1615). Most readers who talk about Don Quijote refer to Part 1, the 1605 novel that is often said to have “invented” the genre. Our discussions will take up Part 2, a work Miguel de Cervantes composed late in life, when he had achieved fame and success as a writer. We will explore the book in its literary, social, political and philosophical contexts; it raises questions about time, space and individual and national identity that are highly relevant to twenty-first century life. Assignments for the course include regular, active and extended reading and discussion; short weekly response papers and a final project. This course will be conducted in Spanish, and students are required to bring the Spanish-language version of the novel to class and use it in all written work; however, students may support their work by reading the novel in other languages as well. NOTE: Prior knowledge of Don Quijote, Part 1 is not required to enroll in SPAN 607; however, students who enroll in this course are *strongly encouraged* to read Don Quijote 1 before the start of Winter term (enjoy! It’s a great read). This course satisfies MA PERIOD 2.

Span 680 Queer Temporalities and Media Aesthetics- Bottaro
Since its beginnings in the early 90s, queer theory has aimed at critiquing and undermining established cultural and economic, social and political power relations that marginalize and suppress nonconforming individuals and groups, in order to render marginalization of lives, individuals or communities visible and to stretch the boundaries of a rigid and excluding normativity. Recently, many of its theorists have turned towards the exploration of queer temporality as a particular perception of the world, of the (political) self, individual experience and collective agency. With the understanding that claims upon power, individual political agency, and possibilities for social change are undergirded by configurations of time and temporality, this seminar will explore critical concerns on the question of queer temporalitites, its organization and its aesthetics and political effects. We will explore critiques of reproductive futurism (Lee Edelman), the thoughts on the queer archive and the significance of feeling “backwards” (Heather Love) as well as the concept of cruel optimism – violence and social or economic precarity understood not just as moments of spectacular crisis but also as slowed time and associated with lived, habitual, quotidian violence that becomes ordinary (Lauren Berlant, Sharon Holland). Simultaneously, queer theory’s ongoing engagement with media studies has also turned to explore the specificity of the aesthetics of time-based media, thinking the specificities of cinema, TV, interactive installation, Internet, and social media. This course will attempt to analyze the intermingling of these different temporalitites as we take into consideration the impact of a mediated environment on the understanding of and dealing with the constitution or exclusion of groups or individuals and how to encounter them aesthetically. MA 3-4


SPRING 2019

SPAN 103: First-Year Spanish- Various
Emphasis on the development of speaking, reading, and writing skills; introduction to Hispanic culture. Sequence. Conducted in Spanish. 

SPAN 112: Intensive Beginning Spanish
Intensive study for experienced language learners (ex: took Spanish in high school).
Introduction to Hispanic culture. Prereq for 111: previous study of Spanish or competence in
another language.

SPAN 203: Second-Year Spanish- Various
Continued development of Spanish-language skills; emphasis on diversity of Hispanic cultures. Sequence. Conducted in Spanish. 

SPAN 301: Cultura y lengua: identidades hispanas- Various
Develops advanced language skills through analysis of major historical influences in the cultures of Spanish-speaking regions: Spain, Latin America, and the United States. 

SPAN 303: Cultura y lengua: expresiones artísticas- Various
Develops advanced language skills through the study of cultural products (e.g., art, literature, film, music) in Spanish-speaking societies. 

SPAN 305: Cultura y lengua: cambios sociales- Various
Develops advanced language skills through the investigation of major currents of change in modern Spanish-speaking societies; gender issues, technology, revolution and counterrevolution. 

SPAN 307: Oral Skills- Various
In this course, students who have completed at least two years of Spanish work on building vocabulary, practicing verbal forms in conversational context, perfecting grammatical structures and pronunciation, and developing complex ideas in discussion, debate, and presentation formats. Prerequisite: two years of Spanish (or placement into third-year Spanish). 2.0 credits.  

SPAN 308: Comunidades Bilingues- Various
Develops advanced language skills through the analysis of social and linguistic dynamics of communities in Spain, Latin America, and the United States where Spanish encounters another language. Taught in Spanish. Sequence with SPAN 301, 303, 305. 

SPAN 311: Advanced Writing in Spanish- Sepulveda
Provides additional language development for students, emphasizing academic writing skills in Spanish. Prereq: Any two of SPAN 301, 303, or 305. 

SPAN 312: Spanish in the Media- Costales
Designed for heritage learners. Examines the role of Spanish in various forms of media such as television, Internet, and literature. Students practice advanced writing skills necessary to participate in argumentative writing and close textual readings. Prereq: any two from SPAN 301, 303, 305 or 308; SPAN 308 is recommended.   

SPAN 320: Intensive Spanish Grammar Review- Various
Review and development of the more complex aspects of Spanish grammar with special attention to idiomatic usage.
***During registration, SPAN 320 carries a restriction limiting the course to students who are Spanish Language and Society majors. This restriction remains in effect during for the first two weeks of registration. After that time, Spanish minors and other students will be able to register for any remaining spots.

SPAN 322: Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics- Grammon, Otero
The course content focuses on the analysis of the basic linguistic characteristics of the
Spanish language. It introduces students to the study of the Spanish sound system
(phonetics and phonology), formation of words (morphology), sentence structure (syntax),
as well as the evolution of the different Spanish varieties (historic, regional, and social). This
class will prepare students for higher-level courses in Hispanic linguistics and others in
which Spanish is used in formal academic contexts. ↑

SPAN 324: Spanish Pronunciation and Phonetics- Grammon, Otero
Study of Spanish sounds, rhythms, and intonation; supervised pronunciation practice.

SPAN 342: Hispanic Cultures through Literature II- Garcia-Pabon
Introduces students to a variety of texts written in the Hispanic world in their literary, artistic,
and historical contexts, from the 16th century to the Latin American independences.
Sequence with SPAN 341, 343, 344. Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308. Approved
to satisfy Category I-Arts and Letters general-education group requirement. Approved to
satisfy Category B: international cultures multicultural requirement.

SPAN 343: Hispanic Cultures through Literature III- Bottaro
Introduces students to a variety of texts written in the Hispanic world in their literary, artistic,
and historical contexts, from the revolutionary wars to the Spanish Civil War. Sequence with
SPAN 341, 342, 344. Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308. Approved to satisfy
Category I-Arts and Letters general-education group requirement. Approved to satisfy
Category B: international cultures multicultural requirement.

SPAN 344: Hispanic Cultures through Literature IV- Herrmann
Introduces students to a variety of texts written in the Hispanic world in their literary, artistic,
and historical contexts, from the 20th century into the 21st. Sequence with SPAN 341, 342,
343. Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308. Approved to satisfy Category I-Arts and
Letters general-education group requirement. Approved to satisfy Category B: international
cultures multicultural requirement.

SPAN 348: United States Latino Literature and Culture- Garcia-Caro
Introduction to Hispanic literature written in the United States. Close reading and discussion
of selected texts by Hispanic authors; emphasis on literary trends and themes.

SPAN 399: Los latinos y la educación- Latinos and Education- Costales
This course will provide a critical analysis of the social, political, economic and cultural
factors surrounding the educational experience of Latinos in the United States, and their
manifestation in cultural production (murals, poetry, music, film, memoir, etc). Develops
advanced language skills as well as awareness of linguistic variation in the field.

SPAN 410: Escritura creativa en lengua castellana / Creative Writing in Spanish- Sepulveda
Este curso busca potenciar las capacidades creativas de los estudiantes de castellano a través de variados ejercicios de escritura. Durante el trimestre el alumno desarrollará su sensibilidad literaria así como también su juicio crítico e interpretativo mediante sesiones de taller y de discusión grupal. Se espera que el alumno escriba poemas, cuentos y, posiblemente, capítulos de algún proyecto mayor de ficción literaria según sea su interés. También será pertinente escribir guiones y textos creativos híbridos en caso de que el alumno tenga interés en ello. Realizaremos ejercicios de escritura dirigida y leeremos textos ad hoc a los proyectos individuales de escritura. Al término del curso, el alumno deberá presentar como proyecto final un conjunto de escritos creativos que den cuenta de su trabajo en clase, incluyendo borradores y correcciones. La última sesión de clase será una presentación pública del proyecto final dirigida a la comunidad universitaria.

SPAN 490: Title TBA- Garcia-Pabon
Course description TBA

SPAN 420/520: Language Contact in Latin America and Spain- Grammon
Course description TBA

SPAN 448/548: Title TBA- Taylor
Course description TBA

SPAN 451/551 Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz and Her Contexts- Powell
A 17th-century Mexican nun boldly enters masculinist literary tradition as poet, playwright, and essayist on philosophical and theological topics. This course examines where she came from (geographically, socially, and culturally) and where she found nourishment and challenge as a creative intellectual. We read her poems, essays, and dramatic texts in the context of colonial Spanish-American culture, looking at what supported her astounding production and what hindrances she encountered. Critical, historical, and theoretical readings illuminate her intellectual, spiritual, and literary frameworks, including the incipient international feminist consciousness of the Baroque period. M.A. Period 2 [Period 1 with instructor approval for appropriate readings and final project] (Most class discussions and all written work for the course in Spanish; some sessions on international contexts conducted in English.)

SPAN 480/580: Politics of Art in Latin America- Bottaro
This course explores the political dimension of art in Latin America, inextricably bound to a history of colonization and military dictatorships. The first goal of the course is the development of critical visual methodologies: How does one “read” images? What is the relationship between the producer and the consumer of an image? How do technologies of visual production and reproduction shape the message, audience, and impact of an image? How do we read historical visual images and how do we understand history in visual imagery? Issues to be emphasized include preconceptions of Latin American art; the shifting political role of art; the power of display in art institutions; appropriation and adaptation; miscegenation and syncretism; the formation of national identities; hegemony of Europe vs. the US; questions of gender, religious orientation, or sexual preference; the appropriateness of introducing current European/American art theory and methods in Latin America; the intersection of national and international movements in Modern art; and art as a means of revolution, resistance, and revolt. We will study contemporary US Latino and Latin American cultural production along politically engaged literature and social movements (specifically those whose politics are anti-capitalist, anti-imperialist, and decolonial). We will cover from colonial Mesoamerican codices to aesthetic revolutions, to muralism, to street art, to contemporary radical Latino and Latin American collectives.

Alongside readings and class discussions, students will develop their own research projects that explore how visual culture, artistic practice, and performance have demanded -and continue to do so- accountability for state violence, invisibilized memories and silenced histories. For graduate students, course discussions will pair readings about visual and cultural production in a Latin American context with theoretical readings about aesthetics and politics produced inside and outside Latin America. We will engage a critical and theoretical exploration of aesthetic form: What is at stake in Latin Americanist discussions of literature, art, and politics that insist on understanding the demarcations that comprise the meaning of an artwork rather than on describing the experience of reading or viewing an artwork? How can these discussions transform a field often marked by identitarian claims? How can arguments for a renewed interest in aesthetic form in Latin American literature and art expand the intellectual and political horizons of the field? This will be a hybrid digital media class. In addition to class discussion, in-class sessions will also include digital media labs. In Spanish.



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