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Italian Course Descriptions: 2019/2020

**TENTATIVE COURSE OFFERINGS, SUBJECT TO CHANGE**

101 = course being offered (bold & underline)

 = counts toward on-campus requirement for MINOR only
 = counts toward on campus requirement for MAJOR and MINOR

Course Catalog  Fall 2019 Winter 2020 Spring 2020 Min  Maj
101, 102, 103 101 102 103
104, 105 104  105
150,152, 252 150 152
199
201, 202, 203 201 202 203
252
301 301
303
305
307
317 317  
318 318  
319 319  
320 320
341
399 399
407, 407/507 ♦ 
408
410, 410/510 ♦ 
441, 441/551 ♦ 
444, 444/544 ♦ 
449, 449/549 ♦ 
461, 461/561 ♦ 
481, 481/581 ♦ 
490, 490/590 ♦ 
491, 491/591 491/591
607

 = counts toward on-campus requirement for MINOR only
 = counts toward on campus requirement for MAJOR and MINOR



FALL 2019

FALL COURSES 2019

ITAL 101:  Menù italiano – Various
In this course, students will begin their adventure into learning Italian.   This means both learning how to learn a new language and learning how to understand the contexts and the modalities that make communication effective and appropriate within Italian culture. From day 1, students will be active users of the Italian language in all 4 skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) and all modes of communication (interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational) and will be invited to reflect upon their learning goals, processes, and outcomes.  Throughout this journey, Italian food, and the cultural practices associated with it, will be our point of departure and our guide by providing an authentic context for our linguistic interactions.

 ITAL 201: The Bel Paese- Various
In this course we will explore Italy’s various and wonderful landscapes that are bound to historical and natural heritage and old traditions. We will also explore Italian “art cities” with their ‘piazza,’ the very core of the community, almost always beautiful from the passage of hundreds or even thousands of years. Finally, we will visit the Italian art collection of the Jordan Schnitzer Museum. The course is based on content-based instructional units that emphasize personal and public stories about everyday life in today’s Italy. Our emphasis is on improving students’ ability to narrate, compare and contrast, express opinions, and establish causal relationships in speaking and writing.

 ITAL 150: Mediterranean Foodways- D. Garvin
Mediterranean foodways show how Italy connects to the broader world through common politics, geography and trade routes. This course uses food as a lens to introduce you to Southern European culture and to examine broader questions of national identity in global Europe. To do so, we will examine culinary culture like cookbooks, recipes, and menus alongside classic examples of food-themed literature and film. This introductory course will provide you with a toolkit for scholarship at the university level: weekly readings and viewings will teach you how to understand Mediterranean history through food and culture. Collaboration guides this course: blogging shows you how to connect with fellow scholars online, and prepares you for the course capstone: a group presentation on Mediterranean food and culture for your classmates and the campus food community.

ITAL 319: Contemporary History, Literature and Culture in Italy – M. Lollini
In this course, taught in Italian, we will study the fundamental events that have marked Italian history and culture between the nineteenth and twentieth centuries: the Risorgimento; the two world wars; Fascism and Resistance. We will read the exemplary pages of poets such as Giacomo Leopardi and Giuseppe Ungaretti, and of novelists and essayists such as Alessandro Manzoni, Giovanni Verga, Italo Calvino, Gianni Celati and Vincenzo Consolo. We will also analyze the Italian landscape in the painting of Giovanni Segantini and in the photography of Luigi Ghirri. Finally, we will study cultural phenomena such as the avant-garde from Scapigliatura to Futurism, and socio-political phenomena such as the Mafia, the great contemporary migrations and the cultural pluralism present in the Italian peninsula.

ITAL 320: Italian Grammar Review in Context – H. Khalsa
This course is designed for students to review and develop more complex aspects of Italian grammar in context, to enhance their written and spoken performance. Students analyze the form and usage of various grammatical structures such as subjunctive, passive voice, and “if” clauses in culturally appropriate written and audio texts. They apply their knowledge by producing short essays (expository, argumentative and creative); oral presentations; and class discussion. They also learn to edit their own written and spoken performance to gain a deeper understanding of grammar usage. Course readings include topics like mental health, gender roles, news media, and literary genres—all with a focus on improving Italian grammar.

 


WINTER COURSES 2020

 ITAL 102:  L’Italia in festa – Various
This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Italian 101.  The goal of this course is to advance the communication skills previously acquired as well as students’ ability to reflect upon their learning processes and to identify effective learning strategies. Students will improve their communicative competence in all 4 skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) and in all modes of communication (interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational) in context through the exploration of some of Italy’s most colorful and iconic festivities and traditions such as the Carnival of Venice and Siena’s spirited Palio.

ITAL 104: Life Italian Style – H. Khalsa
This is the first of two First-Year Intensive Italian courses (it’s followed by Italian 105 in spring). ITAL 104 is designed for students who have no previous Italian instruction and who wish to have an immersive language learning experience. The main goal of this course is to give you (the students) the basic skills you need to communicate in Italian in familiar real-life situations. The course is designed for you to gain skills in three modes of communication (interpretive, presentational, and interpersonal) in culturally authentic contexts. You will start building an understanding of Italian cultural products, practices and perspectives and make comparisons. You will be exposed to Italian texts (written, audio and audio-video) in order to develop strong interpretive reading and listening skills. You will work on your presentational and interpersonal writing and speaking skills based on writing activities, oral presentations, dialogs, interviews and role-play situations.

During the academic year Ital 104 is offered in face-to-face format and in summer you can take it fully online.

 ITAL 202: “Made in Italy”
In this course we will explore Italy’s various and renowned products Made in Italy; we will analyse their historical and regional origins bound to highly specialized artisanal and industrial labor. We also explore the discoveries of famous Italian scientists and inventors such as Galileo and Leonardo. Finally, we will examine the contemporary music heritage focusing on the history of pop and hip hop music in Italy. The course is based on content-based instructional units that emphasize personal and public stories about everyday life in today’s Italy. Our emphasis is on improving students’ ability to narrate, compare and contrast, express opinions, and establish causal relationships in speaking and writing.

 ITAL 318: Baroque and Enlightenment in Italy – M. Lollini
The course begins with the tendency of Baroque culture to set aside and to question the aesthetic, literary, social and political categories that had dominated Renaissance Italy. We will study the great architectural and artistic works of Lorenzo Bernini, the scientific revolution of Galileo Galilei, the Italian religious culture after the Council of Trent, and the great questions raised by Enlightenment culture, such as the fight against both the death penalty and torture. We will go on to study Baroque theater with the Commedia dell’arte and the Enlightenment theater of Carlo Goldoni, as well as the idea of poetry between the seventeenth century and the eighteenth century. Finally we will study the characteristics of the southern Enlightenment by Vincenzo Cuoco and how they differ from those of the Northern Enlightenment.

ITAL 399: Italian Culinary Culture – D. Garvin
From Dante’s infernal Circle of the Gluttons to Caravaggio’s delectable fruit baskets to Artusi’s patriotic nationalist cookbook, Italian history is written in garlic and oil, basil and tomatoes, torte and tortellini.  This course, taught in Italian, focuses on food in literature, opera, and art to teach Italian history. Weekly workshops will examine opera, theater, and painting in historical context. Close readings of cookbooks and recipes will show how playwrights and painters prepared their daily minestra.  We will contextualize the workshops and close readings with series of short lectures devoted to Italian culinary history.  By studying masterpieces from the Renaissance to the present day through the lively and accessible theme of food, you will conclude this course with a knowledge of modern Italian history and culture that is as memorable as it is delicious.

ITAL 491/591: East Africa and Italy – D. Garvin
“La mia casa è dove sono,” “My home is where I am.” Italo-Somali author Igiaba Scego’s famous assertion evokes our seminar’s focus: the enmeshment of colonial Africa and postcolonial Europe. To do so, we will use small research workshops and student-led discussions to apply postcolonial and critical race theory to the study of contemporary poetry, novels, and films.  We will also examine the problematics of the colonial archive and historical memory, giving special attention to issues of access and information flow in government and private repositories like the Archivio Luce, the Archives Nationales d’outre-mer, and the Wolfsonian Museum.

RL 407/507: Queer from the South – S. Rigoletto (Cancelled)
What does ‘queer’ sound like from the point of view of the South? What assumptions about sexuality, identity, and gender does the South challenge? What urgent questions about globalization, mobility and community-making does the South confront the archive of queer theory and queer politics with? This course aims to critique and de-center the canonical queer archive, one that has been built predominantly on North-European and North-Atlantic paradigms. It turns to the Mediterranean and the Souths of the world – the so-called Global Souths – to examine what alternative opportunities may lie there to reinvigorate and expand ‘the queer project’. Drawing on Franco Cassano’s rethinking of the relation between modernity and the South, the course will ask students not to think about the South in the light of ‘queer’, but to think of ‘queer’ in the light of the South.

 


SPRING COURSES 2020

 ITAL 103: Storia e storie d’Italia – Various
This course is the third in the sequence of three Italian courses designed for beginners. It employs a proficiency-oriented, task-and-content-based approach designed to further develop students’ communicative abilities in Italian. It is taught using a contextualized framework in which grammar and linguistic functions are explored through the culturally authentic conduit of recent events in Italian history,  seen through both fictional and non-fictional texts. As active participants in the learning process, students are encouraged to reflect upon their learning goals, practices, and outcomes

 ITAL 105: Italian Journey – H. Khalsa
This is the second course in the First Year Intensive Italian series (continuing with Italian 201 online in Summer or Fall). In this course you will continue to develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Italian in all three modes of communication (interpretive, presentational, and interpersonal) and gain a better understanding of the Italian cultural products, practices and perspectives. The course emphasizes oral communication and listening comprehension in a culturally authentic context. You will be exposed to Italian texts (written and audio) in order to develop strong interpretive skills. You will be challenged to work on writing skills in a way you will be able to analyze, interpret various topics and write about similar topics in your writing projects. You will develop presentation skills in Italian based not only on writing activities but also role-plays, oral presentations, and interviews.

During the academic year Ital 105 is offered in face-to-face format and in summer you can take it fully online.

ITAL152: Italian Cinema: Desire and Resistance – Rigoletto
To what extent can we think of cinema as an instructive medium to analyze forms of resistance against oppression and tyranny? How can films enable us to imagine alternative futures? This course will explore the relevance of these questions to the development of cinema in Italy as one of the key cultural practices and most important forms of political contestation of the 20th century. Students will learn how a number of Italian filmmakers made use of cinema as an instrument of social and ideological critique. They will also examine the endeavors of some of these filmmakers to conceive a new cinematic language against the dominant conventions and codes of Hollywood.

ITAL 203: One Italy, Many Italies- Various
In this course we will explore Italy’s society and economy through specific social phenomena: family structural and cultural changes; young adults life style, education and employment; ‘campanilismo’ and migration. The course is based on content-based instructional units that emphasize personal and public stories about everyday life in today’s Italy. The course’s emphasis on improving students ability to narrate, compare and contrast, express opinions, and establish causal relationships in speaking and writing lays the groundwork for the historical treatment of stories and histories in 300 level courses of Italian.

ITAL 301: Contemporary Italy – Ceccacci
Rapid cultural and urban changes are transforming the landscape and identity of contemporary Italy.  In this course you will examine the underlying shifts taking place in Italian society as your develop advanced interpretive skills and practice argumentative oral and written strategies.   Conducted in Italian.

ITAL 317: Medieval and Renaissance Literature – Regan-Maglione
How is Italian Medieval and renaissance literary exploration of humanity relevant today?  In this course you will read famous writes while developing critical literary skills to better understand their strategies and therefore grasp their endless significance. Conducted in Italian