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French Course Descriptions: 2017/2018


ex: 101 = course NOT being offered (plain text)
ex: 101 = course being offered (bold & underline)

 = counts toward on-campus requirement for MINOR only
 = counts toward on campus requirement for MAJOR and MINOR

Fall 2017 Winter 2018 Spring 2018 Min  Maj
101, 102, 103 101, 102, 103  101, 102, 103
111, 112  111, 112 111, 112
150, 151 150, 151  150, 151
199 199 199
201, 202, 203 201, 202, 203  201, 202, 203
301 301 301
302 302 302
307 307 307
312 312 312  
317 317 317  
318 318 318  
319 319 319
320 320 320 ♦ 
330 330 330 ♦ 
331 331 331 ♦ 
333 333 333
361 361 361
362 362 362 ♦ 
363 363 363 ♦ 
399 399 399
407, 407/507 407, 407/507 407, 407/507
410, 410/510 410, 410/510 410, 410/510 ♦ 
416 416 416  
425 425 425 ♦ 
450, 450/550 450, 450/550 450, 450/550 ♦ 
451, 451/551 451, 451/551 451, 451/551 ♦ 
460, 460/560 460, 460/560 460, 460/560 ♦ 
480, 480/580 480, 480/580 480, 480/580
490, 490/590 490, 490/590 490, 490/590 ♦ 
492, 492/592 492, 492/592 492, 492/592 ♦ 
497, 497/597 497, 497/597 497, 497/597
607 607 607

 = counts toward on-campus requirement for MINOR only
 = counts toward on campus requirement for MAJOR and MINOR


FALL 2017

FR 101: First-Year French- Various
Introduction to French stressing the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a communicative approach. Sequence. Conducted in French. 

FR 201, 202: Second-Year French- Various
Development of reading, writing, and speaking skills; study of short literary and cultural texts; considerable attention paid to oral use of the language. Prereq for 201: first-year language competence. 

FR 301: Culture and Language- Poizat-Newcomb
This course explores French society and culture in the 21st century. It investigates current social issues, cultural traits, tradition and change through a variety of documents (articles, cartoons, videos, websites and a movie). A comparative book on French and American culture is read and summarized at home, chapter by chapter, and discussed in class. Grammar topics include a review of the subjunctive mode, personal pronouns, comparative and superlative, the negation, the imperative mode, the passive voice and numbers in French. Readings, writing and discussion in French.  

FR 302: Contemporary Francophone World- Djiffack
This course would explore the richness and variety of Francophone cultures in the Caribbean, North America, Africa and Southeast Asia, with a particular emphasis on North Africa and Sub-Saharan Africa. We would use literary, journalistic, artistic and audiovisual materials to analyze the cultural legacies of colonialism and the complexities of evolving national identities in the French-speaking world today. 

FR 312: French Survey: Francophone Literature- Djiffack
This course is an introduction to major authors and texts of the French-speaking world outside of France. Conducted in French.  

FR 319: Survey: 19th & 20th Century- Hester

Representative literary works from the 19th and 20th centuries with attention to literary analysis and literary history.

FR 320: Intensive French Grammar Review- Williams
This course promotes linguistic competency in French through intensive review and refinement of French grammar while introducing basic vocabulary and linguistic concepts. 

RL 410/510: Translation- McPherson

Theories and practices of literary translation are profoundly interconnected. The questions and challenges we encounter in translating literary texts have vital implications for our work as literary scholars: engaging in (and thinking about) translation gives us insight into the rich complexities of what we are doing as readers. The practice of translation also enhances and refines language skills in both the source and target language. In translating, we become more accomplished readers and writers, cultivating both our analytical skills and our creative expression. This course is grounded in the belief that theory and practice can most productively be explored together and in a dynamic, collaborative context. We will be considering translators’ approaches to the promises of and obstacles to cross-cultural communication and understanding. We will be paying particular attention to how social, historical, cultural, regional, and generic contexts inform our decisions as translators. We will be concerned with relationships between content and style–nuances of tone, voice, register—and will also be negotiating tricky territories mapped out between clarity and obscurity, domestic and foreign, fidelity and experimentation. The work for this course will include close readings and analysis of selected literary texts alongside their translations; critical readings of translators’ introductions and notes; analysis of book reviews of literary translations; reading and discussion of seminal texts in translation history and theory. Students will work throughout the term on individualized translation projects in small, collaborative, language-specific workshop groups. MA Period 3 & 4  

FR 425: French / English Translation- Poizat-Newcomb
Think you’d like being a translator? FR 425 focuses on the acquisition of practical translation skills, from English to French and from French to English. We study registers, linguistic and cultural differences, the types of translation used for fiction literature, but also for commercials, comic books, poetry, recipes, and instruction manuals. The class is lively and relies on group work. We also practice interpretation (simultaneous oral translation) and learn the basics of translation theory. Weekly quizzes on false cognates. Readings in French and English, discussions in French. . 

 

FR 451/551: Theatrical Battles- Albert-Galtier

Why during the French seventeenth century was so much polemic about theater plays, rules and genres? How can tragedies raise so many passionate fights and « querelles » ? How did some comedies end up at the center of political battles? Was the author playing with provocation? These are some of the questions that we will address in the first part of the course focusing on plays by Corneille, Rotrou, Molière and Racine. Our second focal point will be critical approaches to theatrical representation, those of the seventeenth century (d’Aubignac), and more modern interpretations, including social, moral, esthetic, ideological and political analyses. What are the interactions between the court and the theater, the models and the representations? How is Versailles an example of theatrical representation (Benichou, Apostolides, Viala)? A final concern will be to investigate the production and performance of plays in Paris: actors, companies, audiences, theaters, etc. We will analyze iconographic sources such as drawings, engravings, catalogues of stage sets (Mahelot, Mongredien, Chevalley, Merlin). Period covered: French, Period 2.

FR 607: Advanced Writing Workshop- Gould

Advanced Writing Workshop offers a bi-weekly writing workshop to students engaged in dissertation research in or related to French Studies. Our syllabus turns on your writing projects and is designed to provide readers and commentary on your work. At the core is an agreement to stay on task toward the completion of a full length dissertation project. regular attendance and willingness to stretch beyond one’s own disciplinary boundaries and preconceptions are required.

 


WINTER 2018

FR 101: First-Year French- Various
Introduction to French stressing the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a communicative approach. Sequence. Conducted in French.

FR 202, 203: Second-Year French- Various
Development of reading, writing, and speaking skills; study of short literary and cultural texts; considerable attention paid to oral use of the language. Prereq for 201: first-year language competence. 

FR 301: Culture and Language- Browning
This course explores French society and culture in the 21st century. It investigates current social issues, cultural traits, tradition and change through a variety of documents (articles, cartoons, videos, websites and a movie). A comparative book on French and American culture is read and summarized at home, chapter by chapter, and discussed in class. Grammar topics include a review of the subjunctive mode, personal pronouns, comparative and superlative, the negation, the imperative mode, the passive voice and numbers in French. Readings, writing and discussion in French.  

FR 302: Contemporary Francophone World- Poizat-Newcomb

FR 312: French Survey: Francophone Literature- Djiffack
This course is an introduction to major authors and texts of the French-speaking world outside of France. Conducted in French.  

FR 318: French Survey: Baroque and Enlightenment- Albert-Galtier
Introduction to major themes and ideas in French literature from the 17th and 18th centuries
through the reading of representative texts. ↑

FR 362: French Film- Gould
Course description TBA

FR 480/580: Lit, Democracy, Terror- Browning
Course description TBA



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