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French Course Descriptions: 2016/2017


ex: 101 = course NOT being offered (plain text)
ex: 101 = course being offered (bold & underline)

 = counts toward on-campus requirement for MINOR only
 = counts toward on campus requirement for MAJOR and MINOR

Fall 2016 Winter 2017 Spring 2017 Min  Maj Summer ‘17
101, 102, 103 101, 102, 103 101, 102, 103 101, 102, 103
111, 112 111, 112 111, 112 111, 112
150, 151 150, 151 150, 151
199 199 199 199
201, 202, 203 201, 202, 203 201, 202, 203 201, 202, 203
301 301 301 301
302 302 302 302
307 307 307 307
312 312 312   312
317 317 317   317
318 318 318   318
319 319 319 319
320 320 320 ♦  320
330 330 330 ♦ 
331 331 331 ♦ 
333 333 333
361 361 361
362 362 362 ♦ 
363 363 363 ♦ 
399 399 399
407, 407/507 407, 407/507 407, 407/507
410, 410/510 410, 410/510 410, 410/510 ♦ 
416 416, 416/516 416  
425 425 425 ♦ 
450, 450/550 450, 450/550 450, 450/550 ♦ 
451, 451/551 451, 451/551 451, 451/551 ♦ 
460, 460/560 460, 460/560 460, 460/560 ♦ 
480, 480/580 480, 480/580 480, 480/580
490, 490/590 490, 490/590 490, 490/590 ♦ 
492, 492/592 492, 492/592 492, 492/592 ♦ 
497, 497/597 497, 497/597 497, 497/597
607 607 607

 = counts toward on-campus requirement for MINOR only
 = counts toward on campus requirement for MAJOR and MINOR

 


FALL 2016

FR 101, 102, 103 First-Year French- Various
Introduction to French stressing the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a communicative approach. Sequence. Conducted in French. 

FR 111, 112 Intensive Beginning French- Various
Intensive study for experienced language learners (ex: took French during High School).  Introduction to French culture. Prereq for 111: previous study of French or competence in another Romance language. 

FR 199: Basic French Conversation- Various
In this course, students at 1st- and 2nd-year level French will participate in a series of conversational activities in order to develop their spoken French. Activities will focus on building vocabulary, improving pronunciation, and learning culturally appropriate pragmatic conversation skills (turn taking, conventional turns of phrase, formulaic greetings, etc.). Prerequisite: one year of French, placement into second-year French, or currently enrolled in 1st- or 2nd- year French.  2.0 credits. 

FR 150: Cultural Legacies of France- Browning & McPherson
The purpose of this course is to explore and explode cultural stereotypes while examining some of the social and cultural phenomena we associate most strongly with France. We will look at the way France continuously reworks the cultural legacies of Greek and Roman antiquity as well as the legacies it has bequeathed to the rest of the world. We will focus our reading and discussion through five main topics: language and identity; love and romance; food and fashion; wars and revolutions; and cultural imperialism. Readings and discussions in English. 

FR 201, 202, 203 Second-Year French- Various
Development of reading, writing, and speaking skills; study of short literary and cultural texts; considerable attention paid to oral use of the language. Prereq for 201: first-year language competence. 

FR 301: Culture and Language: Contemporary France- Poizat-Newcomb
This course explores French society and culture in the 21st century. It investigates current social issues, cultural traits, tradition and change through a variety of documents (articles, cartoons, videos, websites and a movie). A comparative book on French and American culture is read and summarized at home, chapter by chapter, and discussed in class. Grammar topics include a review of the subjunctive mode, personal pronouns, comparative and superlative, the negation, the imperative mode, the passive voice and numbers in French. Readings, writing and discussion in French.  

FR 302: Contemporary Francophone World- Djiffack
This course would explore the richness and variety of Francophone cultures in the Caribbean, North America, Africa and Southeast Asia, with a particular emphasis on North Africa and Sub-Saharan Africa. We would use literary, journalistic, artistic and audiovisual materials to analyze the cultural legacies of colonialism and the complexities of evolving national identities in the French-speaking world today. 

FR 307: Oral Skills- Various
In this course, students who have completed at least two years of French work on building vocabulary, practicing verbal forms in conversational context, perfecting grammatical structures and pronunciation, and developing complex ideas in discussion, debate, and presentation formats. Prerequisite: two years of French (or placement into third-year French).  2.0 credits. 

FR 312: French Survey: Francophone Literature- Djiffack
This course is an introduction to major authors and texts of the French-speaking world outside of France. Conducted in French.  

FR 318: French Survey: Baroque and Enlightenment- Albert-Galtier
Introduction to major themes and ideas in French literature from the 17th and 18th centuries through the reading of representative texts. 

FR 320: Intensive French Grammar Review- Williams
This course promotes linguistic competency in French through intensive review and refinement of French grammar while introducing basic vocabulary and linguistic concepts. 

French 331: French Theater- Alexandre Albert-Galtier
From Molière to Olivier Py, French theater has always been a reflection of French society, a stage for political statement, social controversy or a laboratory of forms of discourse, experimentation of esthetic styles and the interaction between different levels of the French language. This class will present some masterpieces of the French theater repertory including plays by Molière, Musset, Beckett and Koltès. “French Theater” has three objectives. The first is to discover and master the vocabulary and concepts linked to French theater. The second is to understand the different genres: comedy, tragic-comedy, drama, tragedy, absurd theater, musical theater, etc. The third is to explore, through different plays, readings and directors’ interpretations, the tension between French identity and its universal implications. To emphasize the current importance of ongoing creation, the class will review some aspect of the Festival d’Avignon, one of the largest world events about contemporary French theater.  This class is for intermediate students and, through the study of dialogues, helps to improve communication skills in French.

FR 410/510: French for Reading Knowledge- Dickey
French for Reading Knowledge is designed to enable students with little or no background in French to read and translate modern French prose with a dictionary; the course is primarily for graduate students and motivated advanced undergraduates seeking reading knowledge of French for research purposes (it should be noted, however, that French for Reading Knowledge MAY NOT be used to satisfy the UO undergraduate language requirement, nor does it count toward the undergraduate major or minor). The work load is structured so as to be both rigorous and flexible: rigorous, by presenting the basic structures of modern French grammar in a systematic and coherent manner; yet flexible, by making reading and translation assignments as discipline-specific as possible for each student’s needs. INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL REQUIRED!  Please contact instructor Connie Dickey for permission to register.  

FR 425: French / English Translation- Poizat-Newcomb
Think you’d like being a translator? FR 425 focuses on the acquisition of practical translation skills, from English to French and from French to English. We study registers, linguistic and cultural differences, the types of translation used for fiction literature, but also for commercials, comic books, poetry, recipes, and instruction manuals. The class is lively and relies on group work. We also practice interpretation (simultaneous oral translation) and learn the basics of translation theory. Weekly quizzes on false cognates. Readings in French and English, discussions in French. . 

FR 480/580: France Fin de Siécle- Gould
Les fins de siècles sont souvent caractérisées par des attitudes contradictoires dans l’imaginaire culturelle d’un peuple :  fin du monde, avenir technologique prometteur; ‘clash of civilizations,’ communications globales ; dévastation de l’environement, nourriture artificielle suppléant aux besoins du monde entier, etc….  A la fin du 19e siècle, les mêmes contradictions se constatent. En fait, on nomme le dernier tiers du siècle et la « Belle époque » et la « Décadence, »  mettant en relief la portée de cette attitude ambigue et incertaine.  Dans ce cours nous allons étudier très en détail deux romans entourés de plusieurs essais, poèmes, articles critiques, appréciations artistiques qui cernent les contraditions de la fin du 19e siècle.  Tournant autour de A Rebours de J. K. Huysmans et de Au Bonheur des Dames par Emile Zola, nous lirons Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Freud, Schopenhauer, Taine, Wagner et Debussy ainsi que des historiens tels que Lawrence Kramer sur la musique, Michel Winock sur l’Affaire Dreyfus, Christophe Charle sur la naissance des Intellectuels,.  (FR 580 : exposé oral + 1 essai de recherches ; FR 480 : 2 essais). M.A. Period 3  

FR 490/590: Mongo Beti- Djffack
Après quarante ans d’exil quasi ininterrompu en France, Mongo Beti retourne au Cameroun, son pays natal, à la faveur de la chute du communisme. C’était en février 1991. À la suite de ce retour, l’inspiration de l’ancien exilé se fait débordante, et, durant la dernière décennie de sa vie, il publie coup sur coup La France contre l’Afrique, L’Histoire du fou, Trop de soleil tue l’amour et Branle-bas en noir et blanc. La trilogie publiée à titre posthume sous le titre de Mongo Beti : le Rebelle I, II et III constitue une somme de pensée profonde développée par l’ancien exilé pendant sa dernière décennie de vie au Cameroun. Cette analyse percutante de drame de l’Afrique francophone contemporaine, drame exemplifié par le Cameroun, dévoile un auteur engagé sur tous les fronts : la vie syndicale et politique, l’activité économique et culturelle, les questions de droits de l’homme et de développement. Dans le présent séminaire, nous analyserons le regard que pose Mongo Beti sur sa société d’origine après son retour d’exil. Dans ces écrits post-exil, l’écrivain rebelle propose une (re)lecture de son milieu d’origine sous les prisme de la culture française dont il est fortement imprégné. Nous étudierons le parallèle permanent que trace l’auteur entre la France et l’Afrique tant du point de vue de la société, de la politique, de la culture que sur des aspects économiques et même écologiques. C’est dire que seront examinées la problématique de la diversité humaine et la complexité des relations entre l’ancienne puissance colonisatrice et le monde postcolonial.  M.A. Period 4.

Livres prescrits :
Mongo Beti : La France contre l’Afrique
Mongo Beti : L’Histoire du Fou
Mongo Beti : Trop de Soleit tue l’amour
Mongo Beti : Branle-bas en noir et blanc
Mongo Beti : Mongo Beti : le Rebelle I
Mongo Beti : Mongo Beti : le rebelle II
Mongo Beti: Mongo Beti: le Rebelle III    


WINTER 2017

FR 101, 102, 103 First-Year French- Various
Introduction to French stressing the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a communicative approach. Sequence. Conducted in French. 

FR 111, 112 Intensive Beginning French- Various
Intensive study for experienced language learners (ex: took French during High School).  Introduction to French culture. Prereq for 111: previous study of French or competence in another Romance language. 

FR 199: Basic French Conversation- Various
In this course, students at 1st- and 2nd-year level French will participate in a series of conversational activities in order to develop their spoken French. Activities will focus on building vocabulary, improving pronunciation, and learning culturally appropriate pragmatic conversation skills (turn taking, conventional turns of phrase, formulaic greetings, etc.). Prerequisite: one year of French, placement into second-year French, or currently enrolled in 1st- or 2nd- year French.  2.0 credits. 

FR 201, 202, 203 Second-Year French- Various
Development of reading, writing, and speaking skills; study of short literary and cultural texts; considerable attention paid to oral use of the language. Prereq for 201: first-year language competence. 

FR 301: Culture and Language: Contemporary France- Moore
This course explores French society and culture in the 21st century. It investigates current social issues, cultural traits, tradition and change through a variety of documents (articles, cartoons, videos, websites and a movie). A comparative book on French and American culture is read and summarized at home, chapter by chapter, and discussed in class. Grammar topics include a review of the subjunctive mode, personal pronouns, comparative and superlative, the negation, the imperative mode, the passive voice and numbers in French. Readings, writing and discussion in French.  

FR 302: Contemporary Francophone World – Poizat Newcomb
This course explores the richness and variety of Francophone cultures in the Caribbean, North America, Africa and Southeast Asia, with a particular emphasis on North Africa and Sub-Saharan Africa. We use literary, journalistic, artistic and audiovisual materials to analyze the cultural legacies of colonialism and the complexities of evolving national identities in the French-speaking world today. The course is organized around thematic units such as Ecology and Environment; Belief and Identity; Struggle and Resistance; Migration, Exile and Diaspora; Folklore and Cultural Production. Grammar topics include a review of the past tenses, the future and conditional, and relative pronouns. Readings, writing and videos in French, discussions in French.  

FR 307: Oral Skills- Various
In this course, students who have completed at least two years of French work on building vocabulary, practicing verbal forms in conversational context, perfecting grammatical structures and pronunciation, and developing complex ideas in discussion, debate, and presentation formats. Prerequisite: two years of French (or placement into third-year French).  2.0 credits. 

FR 317: French Survey: Medieval and Renaissance- Hester
Introduction to major themes and ideas in French literature from the medieval and Renaissance periods through the reading of representative texts. 

FR 319: French Survey: 19th & 20th Centuries- Browning
Representative literary works from the 19th and 20th centuries with attention to literary analysis and literary history. 

FR 320: Intensive French Grammar Review- Williams
This course promotes linguistic competency in French through intensive review and refinement of French grammar while introducing basic vocabulary and linguistic concepts. 

FR 333: French Narrative- McPherson
Covers important aspects of French narrative. Reading texts from different periods. Emphasis on formal aspects and critical reading.  Prereq: FR 301, 303.  

FR 362: French Film- Browning
Focuses on the differences between American culture and French and Francophone cultures. Addresses a sensitive issue exemplified by the attitude of the international movie industry.  

FR 407: Runaways, adventurers, and diplomats: French women traveling and writing in the time of Louis XIV- Hester
This course focuses on the textual production of three French women who converged in Madrid, Spain, in 1680, for completely different reasons. Marie Mancini, niece of Louis XIV’s revered minister, Cardinal Mazarin, who had caused an international scandal by escaping an unhappy marriage to an Italian aristocrat; Marie-Catherine d’Aulnoy, the famous writer of fairy tales, fled France after being found guilty of high treason; and Marie-Gigault de Bellefonds, Marquise de Villars, wife of the ambassador to Spain, had been given a secret diplomatic mission in Madrid. In this course we will read from Mancini’s Memoirs, D’Aulnoy’s Travels to Spain and Memoirs from the Court of Spain, and Bellefonds’ letters from Spain, among other texts, to consider the role of 17th-century women writers in French and European contexts, and women’s contributions to epistolary and autobiographical writing.  

FR 416/516: Advanced Writing in French- Poizat Newcomb
Even if you don’t like writing, you should have some fun in this class. It offers a variety of activities: dictation practice, vocabulary review, creative writing, a study of traditional writing tips with a user-friendly textbook, and the step-by-step creation of a research essay about a topic that is of genuine interest to you. We aim to end the class with a clear, coherent, interesting paper (in some cases, publishable) written with a reader-oriented mind. Throughout the term, we study how to choose a topic, how to present a claim, how to find and use sources, and how to organize and support our ideas in a clear, attractive, convincing manner – all useful skills, in and out of the classroom!  Conducted in French. 

FR 450/550: Painters and Writers- Albert-Galtier
In this class we will investigate the issue of literary representation, the interaction between visual artists and writers and the interdisciplinary topic of literary discourses on art through a close textual reading of descriptions of painting, portraits and art allegories included in poems, novels, and essays by writers as Molière, Corneille, La Fontaine, Madame de Lafayette and others. We will analyze the emergence of art criticism during the seventeenth century(Du Fresnoy, Perrault, Roger de Piles, Félibien) and also the conditions under which a work of art has been received by an audience contemporary to the artist (Corneille, Molière, Perrault, La Fontaine, Scarron and Poussin).  M.A. Period 2  

FR 497/597: Francophone Women’s Writing: Women’s Autobiography- McPherson
This course will focus on life writings, memoirs and autofictions by 20th- and 21st-century French and francophone women writers. We will be looking at autobiography as a genre and considering such topics as the relationship between memory and “truth” ; the narration of childhood and adolescence; the construction of identities across time; the gendering of autobiographical narratives; and the social, psychological, political and cultural contexts of individuals’ life stories. Readings may include works or excerpts of works by some of the following authors: Beauvoir, Colette, Duras, Sarraute, Ernaux, Bouraoui, Roy, Djebar, Pineau, Blais, Brossard.  M.A. Period 3 & 4  


SPRING 2017

FR 101, 102, 103 First-Year French- Various
Introduction to French stressing the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a communicative approach. Sequence. Conducted in French. 

FR 111, 112 Intensive Beginning French- Various
Intensive study for experienced language learners (ex: took French during High School).  Introduction to French culture. Prereq for 111: previous study of French or competence in another Romance language.  

FR 199: Basic French Conversation- Various
In this course, students at 1st- and 2nd-year level French will participate in a series of conversational activities in order to develop their spoken French. Activities will focus on building vocabulary, improving pronunciation, and learning culturally appropriate pragmatic conversation skills (turn taking, conventional turns of phrase, formulaic greetings, etc.). Prerequisite: one year of French, placement into second-year French, or currently enrolled in 1st- or 2nd- year French.  2.0 credits. 

FR 201, 202, 203 Second-Year French- Various
Development of reading, writing, and speaking skills; study of short literary and cultural texts; considerable attention paid to oral use of the language. Prereq for 201: first-year language competence. 

FR 301: Culture and Language: Contemporary France- Browning
Training in language and culture of modern France using newspapers, short stories, poetry and film. Vocabulary enrichment activities. Conducted in French.  

FR 302: Contemporary Francophone World- Djiffack
Training in language and cultures of the French-speaking world using literary texts, websites, videos. Grammar review and vocabulary enrichment.  

FR 307: Oral Skills- Various
In this course, students who have completed at least two years of French work on building vocabulary, practicing verbal forms in conversational context, perfecting grammatical structures and pronunciation, and developing complex ideas in discussion, debate, and presentation formats. Prerequisite: two years of French (or placement into third-year French).  2.0 credits. 

FR 312: French Survey: Francophone Literature- Djiffack
Introduction to major authors and texts of the French-speaking world outside of France.  

FR 318. French Survey: Baroque and Enlightenment- Albert-Galtier
Introduction to major themes and ideas in French literature from the 17th and 18th centuries through the reading of representative texts.  

FR 330: French Poetry- Moore
L’objectif du cours est d’étudier la poésie française à travers le temps dans toute sa richesse, sa beauté et sa diversité. A travers de nombreuses analyses textuelles, nous mettrons en lumière les aspects essentiels, formels et thématiques, de la poétique française. Lectures, exercices, exposés et devoirs écrits vous permettront d’améliorer votre français écrit et oral et de vous familiariser avec la tradition poétique française et ses plus grands auteurs. Lectures, discussions et travaux écrits seront tous effectués en français.  

FR 362. French Film- Gould
Focuses on the differences between American culture and French and Francophone cultures. Addresses a sensitive issue exemplified by the attitude of the international movie industry.  Prereq: FR 301, FR 302.  

FR 407: The Tao of Montaigne- Poizat-Newcomb
Montaigne lived at the time of Shakespeare, but he asked questions we still ponder today, and not just in the classroom: “What’s the difference between humans and animals? Is intelligence a curse? What is the ego? How can I calm my fear of death? What religion should I follow? What’s the best way to live my life so I have no regrets? How should I treat my body? What did I learn from getting old?” Montaigne’s texts are contrasted with texts and videos by modern-day teachers like Eckhart Tolle, Pema Chodron, Byron Katie, Thich Nhat Hanh, as well as very old advice from the Tao Te Ching and Sufi poems. Readings, writing and discussion in French. 

FR 451: Molière: Sex, culture and society in 17th Century France
A. Albert-Galtier
From the early farces to the great comedies, Molière’s theater provides an insightful look into seventeenth century French society. This class offers a reading of Molière’s most important plays. We will discuss the different functions of Molière: actor, writer, director, and producer. The program may include: Les Précieuses ridicules, L’Ecole des femmes, La Critique de L’Ecole des femmes, L’Impromptu de Versailles, Tartuffe, Dom Juan, Le Misanthrope, Le Bourgeois gentilhomme, Les Femmes savantes. 

FR 460/560: Révolutions & Romantismes- Moore
Quels sont les liens entre les débuts du romantisme français et la révolution de 1789 (en France) et de 1791 (à Saint Domingue, aujourd’hui Haïti) ? Après une étude approfondie des Rêveries du Promeneur solitaire posthumes de Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1782) pour dégager l’importance de sa pensée et son esthétique au début du dix-neuvième siècle, nous analyserons des fictions héritières des conflits révolutionnaires et impériaux, Histoire de Pauline; Mirza; et Zulma (1794-5) de Germaine de Staël puis Atala et René (1802) de Chateaubriand. Nous découvrirons les héroïnes et héros éponymes de Marceline Desbordes-Valmore (Sarah, 1821), Claire de Duras (Ourika, 1823) et Victor Hugo (Bug Jargal, 1826) et la mise en scène des questions coloniales sous le règne de Napoléon, en particulier l’impact de la révolution haïtienne. Les Mémoires d’outre-tombe de Chateaubriand, commencées en 1811, dont nous lirons les premiers livres, nous permettront d’étudier un témoignage capital sur les renversements sociopolitiques déclenchés par la Révolution française de 1789. Nous terminerons par Georges (1843) le roman méconnu d’Alexandre Dumas père—mise en scène surprenante d’un personnage mulâtre (comme son auteur) face aux préjugés raciaux sur l’île de France (aujourd’hui île Maurice).  M.A. Period 2.  

FR 480/580: L’art est dans la rue- Browning
Pendant mai 68 les étudiants de Beaux-Arts ont placardé Paris avec des affiches déclarant: « La beauté est dans la rue. » Avec une légère différence, ce cours s’interroge sur les rapports entre l’art et la rue du 19e au 21e siècle. Commençant avec Balzac, Baudelaire et Rimbaud, on en construit une généalogie en passant par la Commune de Paris, la loi déclarant « Défense d’afficher », l’anarchie, le surréalisme et le situationnisme pour arriver aux diverses formes d’art et d’activisme aujourd’hui telles que le graffiti, le street art, les happenings et le brandalisme. Notre but est d’entrer dans les débats sur la « place » et le « rôle » de l’art et d’en comprendre leurs enjeux historiques.  M.A. Period 3 & 4.  


SUMMER 2017

FR 101, 102, 103: 1st Year French
Introduction to French stressing the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a communicative approach. Sequence. Conducted in French. 

FR 201, 202, 203: 2nd Year French
Development of reading, writing, and speaking skills; study of short literary and cultural texts; considerable attention paid to oral use of the language. Sequence. 

FR 320 Intensive French Grammar Review- Dickey
Promotes linguistic competency in French through intensive review and refinement of French grammar while introducing basic vocabulary and linguistic concepts. Prereq: FR 203.  



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