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French Course Descriptions: 2017/2018


ex: 101 = course NOT being offered (plain text)
ex: 101 = course being offered (bold & underline)

 = counts toward on-campus requirement for MINOR only
 = counts toward on campus requirement for MAJOR and MINOR

Fall 2017 Winter 2018 Spring 2018 Min  Maj
101, 102, 103 101, 102, 103  101, 102, 103
111, 112  111, 112 111, 112
150, 151 150, 151  150, 151
199 199 199
201, 202, 203 201, 202, 203  201, 202, 203
301 301 301
302 302 302
307 307 307
312 312 312  
317 317 317  
318 318 318  
319 319 319
320 320 320 ♦ 
330 330 330 ♦ 
331 331 331 ♦ 
333 333 333
361 361 361
362 362 362 ♦ 
363 363 363 ♦ 
399 399 399
407, 407/507 407, 407/507 407, 407/507
410, 410/510 410, 410/510 410, 410/510 ♦ 
416 416 416  
425 425 425 ♦ 
450, 450/550 450, 450/550 450, 450/550 ♦ 
451, 451/551 451, 451/551 451, 451/551 ♦ 
460, 460/560 460, 460/560 460, 460/560 ♦ 
480, 480/580 480, 480/580 480, 480/580
490, 490/590 490, 490/590 490, 490/590 ♦ 
492, 492/592 492, 492/592 492, 492/592 ♦ 
497, 497/597 497, 497/597 497, 497/597
607 607 607

 = counts toward on-campus requirement for MINOR only
 = counts toward on campus requirement for MAJOR and MINOR


FALL 2017

FR 101: First-Year French- Various
Introduction to French stressing the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a communicative approach. Sequence. Conducted in French. 

FR 201, 202: Second-Year French- Various
Development of reading, writing, and speaking skills; study of short literary and cultural texts; considerable attention paid to oral use of the language. Prereq for 201: first-year language competence. 

FR 301: Culture and Language- Poizat-Newcomb
This course explores French society and culture in the 21st century. It investigates current social issues, cultural traits, tradition and change through a variety of documents (articles, cartoons, videos, websites and a movie). A comparative book on French and American culture is read and summarized at home, chapter by chapter, and discussed in class. Grammar topics include a review of the subjunctive mode, personal pronouns, comparative and superlative, the negation, the imperative mode, the passive voice and numbers in French. Readings, writing and discussion in French.  

FR 302: Contemporary Francophone World- Djiffack
This course would explore the richness and variety of Francophone cultures in the Caribbean, North America, Africa and Southeast Asia, with a particular emphasis on North Africa and Sub-Saharan Africa. We would use literary, journalistic, artistic and audiovisual materials to analyze the cultural legacies of colonialism and the complexities of evolving national identities in the French-speaking world today. 

FR 312: French Survey: Francophone Literature- Djiffack
This course is an introduction to major authors and texts of the French-speaking world outside of France. Conducted in French.  

FR 319: Survey: 19th & 20th Century- Hester
Representative literary works from the 19th and 20th centuries with attention to literary analysis and literary history.

FR 320: Intensive French Grammar Review- Williams
This course promotes linguistic competency in French through intensive review and refinement of French grammar while introducing basic vocabulary and linguistic concepts. 

RL 410/510: Translation- McPherson

Theories and practices of literary translation are profoundly interconnected. The questions and challenges we encounter in translating literary texts have vital implications for our work as literary scholars: engaging in (and thinking about) translation gives us insight into the rich complexities of what we are doing as readers. The practice of translation also enhances and refines language skills in both the source and target language. In translating, we become more accomplished readers and writers, cultivating both our analytical skills and our creative expression. This course is grounded in the belief that theory and practice can most productively be explored together and in a dynamic, collaborative context. We will be considering translators’ approaches to the promises of and obstacles to cross-cultural communication and understanding. We will be paying particular attention to how social, historical, cultural, regional, and generic contexts inform our decisions as translators. We will be concerned with relationships between content and style–nuances of tone, voice, register—and will also be negotiating tricky territories mapped out between clarity and obscurity, domestic and foreign, fidelity and experimentation. The work for this course will include close readings and analysis of selected literary texts alongside their translations; critical readings of translators’ introductions and notes; analysis of book reviews of literary translations; reading and discussion of seminal texts in translation history and theory. Students will work throughout the term on individualized translation projects in small, collaborative, language-specific workshop groups. MA Period 3 & 4  

FR 425: French / English Translation- Poizat-Newcomb
Think you’d like being a translator? FR 425 focuses on the acquisition of practical translation skills, from English to French and from French to English. We study registers, linguistic and cultural differences, the types of translation used for fiction literature, but also for commercials, comic books, poetry, recipes, and instruction manuals. The class is lively and relies on group work. We also practice interpretation (simultaneous oral translation) and learn the basics of translation theory. Weekly quizzes on false cognates. Readings in French and English, discussions in French. . 

 

FR 451/551: Theatrical Battles- Albert-Galtier

Why during the French seventeenth century was so much polemic about theater plays, rules and genres? How can tragedies raise so many passionate fights and « querelles » ? How did some comedies end up at the center of political battles? Was the author playing with provocation? These are some of the questions that we will address in the first part of the course focusing on plays by Corneille, Rotrou, Molière and Racine. Our second focal point will be critical approaches to theatrical representation, those of the seventeenth century (d’Aubignac), and more modern interpretations, including social, moral, esthetic, ideological and political analyses. What are the interactions between the court and the theater, the models and the representations? How is Versailles an example of theatrical representation (Benichou, Apostolides, Viala)? A final concern will be to investigate the production and performance of plays in Paris: actors, companies, audiences, theaters, etc. We will analyze iconographic sources such as drawings, engravings, catalogues of stage sets (Mahelot, Mongredien, Chevalley, Merlin). Period covered: French, Period 2.

FR 607: Advanced Writing Workshop- Gould

Advanced Writing Workshop offers a bi-weekly writing workshop to students engaged in dissertation research in or related to French Studies. Our syllabus turns on your writing projects and is designed to provide readers and commentary on your work. At the core is an agreement to stay on task toward the completion of a full length dissertation project. regular attendance and willingness to stretch beyond one’s own disciplinary boundaries and preconceptions are required.

 


WINTER 2018

FR 102: First-Year French- Various
Introduction to French stressing the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a communicative approach. Sequence. Conducted in French.

FR 111, 112 Intensive Beginning French- Various
Intensive study for experienced language learners (ex: took French during High
School). Introduction to French culture. Prereq for 111: previous study of French or
competence in another Romance language.

FR 202, 203: Second-Year French- Various
Development of reading, writing, and speaking skills; study of short literary and cultural texts; considerable attention paid to oral use of the language. Prereq for 201: first-year language competence. 

FR 301: Culture and Language- Browning
This course explores French society and culture in the 21st century. It investigates current social issues, cultural traits, tradition and change through a variety of documents (articles, cartoons, videos, websites and a movie). A comparative book on French and American culture is read and summarized at home, chapter by chapter, and discussed in class. Grammar topics include a review of the subjunctive mode, personal pronouns, comparative and superlative, the negation, the imperative mode, the passive voice and numbers in French. Readings, writing and discussion in French.  

FR 302: Contemporary Francophone World- Poizat-Newcomb
This course explores the richness and variety of Francophone cultures in the Caribbean,
North America, Africa and Southeast Asia, with a particular emphasis on North Africa and
Sub-Saharan Africa. We use literary, journalistic, artistic and audiovisual materials to
analyze the cultural legacies of colonialism and the complexities of evolving national
identities in the French-speaking world today. The course is organized around thematic
units such as Ecology and Environment; Belief and Identity; Struggle and Resistance;
Migration, Exile and Diaspora; Folklore and Cultural Production. Grammar topics include a
review of the past tenses, the future and conditional, and relative pronouns. Readings,
writing and videos in French, discussions in French.

FR 312: French Survey: Francophone Literature- Djiffack
This course is an introduction to major authors and texts of the French-speaking world outside of France. Conducted in French.  

FR 318: French Survey: Baroque and Enlightenment- Albert-Galtier
Introduction to major themes and ideas in French literature from the 17th and 18th centuries
through the reading of representative texts. ↑

FR 362: French Film “Paris:  Capital Culturelle de l’Europe”- Gould
In this course, we will use Paris as the center piece of a series of spokes that launch inquiries into the values and legacies of post-war French culture on the continent and in the former colonies as reflected in recent French films and novels.  Themes include:  Paris américain; Paris banlieu; Paris africain; Paris juif arabe; Paris terroriste; Paris-Europe.  Readings include:  Alice Kaplan’s French Lessons, selections from Mariama Bâ’s Le Chant écarlate, and stories by Albert Camus from L’Exil et le Royaume as well as essays from his Algerian war notebooks.  Films vary, but may well include : A Bout de souffle Métisse, La Haine, La Bataillle d’Algers, L’Auberge espagnol, Madame Rosa,  Touki Bouki, Entre les murs, and La Jetée among others.

FR 416: Advanced Writing in French- Poizat-Newcomb
Even if you don’t like writing, you should have some fun in this class! With writing tips from a user-friendly textbook, it offers a variety of activities: in-depth text examination, weekly playful creative writing, and the step-by-step creation of a research essay about a topic that is of genuine interest to you. We aim to end the class with a clear, coherent, interesting paper (in some cases, publishable) written with a reader-oriented mind. Throughout the term, we study how to choose a topic, how to present a claim, how to find and use sources, and how to organize and support our ideas in a clear, attractive, convincing manner – all useful skills, in and out of the classroom! Conducted in French.

FR 480/580: Lit, Democracy, Terror- Browning
Quand Robespierre a justifié la Terreur en affirmant qu’elle était “une conséquence du principe générale de la démocratie,” il a soudé la démocratie et la terreur d’une manière durable. Après la révolution politique, certains ont exigé une révolution esthétique pour compléter la révolution politique de 1789. D’autres ont lancé l’insulte de “93 littéraire” pour dénoncer ce qui a été vu comme outrage à l’esthetique classique et au “bon goût.” Dans ce cours on pose la problématique des rapports entre littérature, démocratie et terreur à travers trois moments historiques: la Terreur, le romantisme et la naissance de l’avant-garde après la Commune de Paris et l’anarcho-terrorisme. MA Periods 2 and 3 

 


SPRING 2018

FR 103: First-Year French- Various
Introduction to French stressing the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a communicative approach. Sequence. Conducted in French.

FR 111, 112 Intensive Beginning French- Various
Intensive study for experienced language learners (ex: took French during High
School). Introduction to French culture. Prereq for 111: previous study of French or
competence in another Romance language.

FR 202, 203: Second-Year French- Various
Development of reading, writing, and speaking skills; study of short literary and cultural texts; considerable attention paid to oral use of the language. Prereq for 201: first-year language competence. 

FR 301: Culture and Language- Browning
This course explores French society and culture in the 21st century. It investigates current social issues, cultural traits, tradition and change through a variety of documents (articles, cartoons, videos, websites and a movie). A comparative book on French and American culture is read and summarized at home, chapter by chapter, and discussed in class. Grammar topics include a review of the subjunctive mode, personal pronouns, comparative and superlative, the negation, the imperative mode, the passive voice and numbers in French. Readings, writing and discussion in French.

FR 307: Oral Skills- Williams
In this course, students who have completed at least two years of French work on building
vocabulary, practicing verbal forms in conversational context, perfecting grammatical
structures and pronunciation, and developing complex ideas in discussion, debate, and
presentation formats. Prerequisite: two years of French (or placement into third-year
French). 2.0 credits. ↑

FR 319: French Survey: 19th & 20th Centuries- Browning
Representative literary works from the 19th and 20th centuries with attention to literary
analysis and literary history.

FR 330: French Poetry- Moore
L’objectif du cours est d’étudier la poésie française à travers le temps dans toute sa
richesse, sa beauté et sa diversité. A travers de nombreuses analyses textuelles, nous
mettrons en lumière les aspects essentiels, formels et thématiques, de la poétique
française. Lectures, exercices, exposés et devoirs écrits vous permettront d’améliorer votre
français écrit et oral et de vous familiariser avec la tradition poétique française et ses plus
grands auteurs. Lectures, discussions et travaux écrits seront tous effectués en français.

FR 407 The Tao of Montaigne- Poizat-Newcomb
Montaigne lived at the time of Shakespeare, but he asked questions we still ponder today, and not just in the classroom: What is human nature? Is intelligence a curse? How can I calm my fear of death? What religion should I follow? Is empathy a weakness? What is a good life?
We study excerpts from Montaigne’s Essays along with texts and videos by modern-day teachers like Eckhart Tolle, Pema Chodron, Byron Katie and Thich Nhat Hanh, as well as poems from the Tao Te Ching and Sufi tradition. Emphasis is put on group discussions. Readings, writing and discussion in modern French.

FR 490: Modern and Contemporary French Literature Lire, lectures, livres- McPherson
This course is about reading. We will be doing it and we will be thinking about it. In our study of selected works of 20th- and 21st-century French literature we will focus on the different ways in which these novels and essays incorporate reflections on books and reading. We will look at how they articulate, thematize and problematize the relationship between author and reader. We will also look at the kinds of reading that they encourage, inspire, resist. We will consider links between books and childhood memories, the pleasures of the physical act of reading, the figure of the translator as reader/writer, relationships between reading and time, collaborations and tensions between storytelling and the written text.

FR 490/590 Transatlantic Postcolonial- Djiffack
To understand the racial tension on the public and private spheres of the US since the beginning of the Obama administration, I am proposing, in this seminar on Atlantic Postcolonial, to revisit the classics of African-American literature. We will study authors such as Chester Himes, James Baldwin, Richard Wright, Frederick Douglass, Alex Haley and Malcom X. As radical as their perspectives may seem, their works are an extraordinary tools to enlighten public debate on racial cohabitation from the era of plantation to civil rights movement, from affirmative action to Black Lives Matter. MA Period 4.

Prescribed books

  • Chester Himes, Regret sans repentir, Paris, Gallimard
  • Chester Himes, Plan B
  • James Baldwin, La prochaine fois le feu
  • James Baldwin, La conversion
  • Richard Wright, Black Boy
  • Richard Wright, Un enfant du pays
  • Frederick Douglass, La Vie de Frederick Douglass, esclave américain, écrite par lui-même
  • Alex Haley, Racines,
  • Alex Haley and Malcolm X, L’Autobiographie de Malcom X


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