Courses and Curriculum

Romance Languages Course Descriptions: 2022-2023

**TENTATIVE COURSE OFFERINGS, SUBJECT TO CHANGE**


FALL 2022

FRENCH

FR 101: First-Year French- Various

Introduction to French stressing the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a communicative approach. Sequence. Conducted in French. 

FR 111: Intensive Beginning French- Various

Intensive study for experienced language learners (ex: took French during High School). Introduction to French culture. Prereq for 111: previous study of French or competence in another Romance language.

FR 201: Second-Year French- Various

Development of reading, writing, and speaking skills; study of short literary and cultural texts; considerable attention paid to oral use of the language. Prereq for 201: first-year language competence. 

FR 301: Culture and Language - 4 credits - Géraldine Poizat-Newcomb

This course explores French society and culture in the 21st century. It investigates current social issues, cultural traits, tradition and change through a variety of documents (articles, cartoons, videos, websites, and a movie). A comparative book on French and American culture is read and summarized at home, chapter by chapter, and discussed in class. Grammar topics include a review of the subjunctive mode, personal pronouns, comparative and superlative, the negation, the imperative mode, the passive voice, and numbers in French. Readings, writing and discussion in French. 

FR 318: Monarchie, Liberté, Révolution - 4 credits - Alexandre Albert-Galtier

Introduction to major themes and ideas in French literature from the 17th and 18th centuries through the reading of representative texts. Prereq: FR 301 or FR 302.

FR 319: Survey of 19th and 20th Century French Literature - 4 Credits - Andre Djiffack 

Introduction to major themes and ideas in French literature from the 19th and 20th Centuries through the reading of representative texts. 

Prescribed Books Guy de Maupassant, Pierre et Jean and André Gide, La Symphonie pastorale.

FR 425 French/English translation - 4 credits - Géraldine Poizat-Newcomb 

Think you’d like working as a translator? Come and find out! FR 425 focuses on the acquisition of practical translation skills, from English to French and from French to English. We study registers, linguistic and cultural differences, the types of translation used in literature, but also in commercials, comic books, poetry, recipes, and instruction manuals. The class is lively and relies on group work. We also practice interpretation (simultaneous oral translation) and learn the basics of translation theory. Weekly quizzes on false cognates.   

Readings in French and English, discussions in French. 

FR 460/560 Liberté & Égalité – 4 Credits - Fabienne Moore 

Nous travaillerons dans ce séminaire sur la liberté et l’égalité comme idées, idéaux et droits tels que les deux termes évoluent au cours du dix-huitième siècle. Nos sources primaires seront des pièces de théâtre (Marivaux, Beaumarchais, de Gouge) et des romans (Manon Lescaut, Ourika) qui permettent de mettre en scène de façon plus ou moins subversive, et plus ou moins utopique la liberté et l’égalité. Nous étudierons aussi les essais de Jean-Jacques Rousseau puis la Déclaration universelle des droits de l’homme au miroir de la Déclaration universelle des droits de la femme d’Olympe de Gouge. Bien que liberté et égalité soient souvent aujourd’hui invoquées comme des vérités évidentes, nous chercherons ce que signifient ces deux mots avant et après les Révolutions française et haïtienne. MA Period 2 


ITALIAN

ITAL 101 - Elementary Italian: That's Amore 

Supervised by Lauretta De Renzo

Italians are known for savoring all pleasures and beauty that life can offer, from food to fashion, art to style, and language to conviviality. In this hands-on course, you will begin discovering Italy, its rich culture, and its people by becoming an active user of the Italian language, starting on the first day of class. You will learn how to learn a new language and understand the modalities that make communication effective and culturally appropriate. By the end of this course, you will be able to be an expert food traveler in Italy, from restaurant selection to menu evaluations to ordering and paying for a typical Italian four-course meal; also, you will be a connoisseur of the famous regional cuisines and the Italian lifestyle of "A tavola non si invecchi mai" (At the table, one does not grow old). As you hone your skills, you will be invited to reflect upon your personal learning goals, processes, and outcomes.

Workload: This course is offered in three formats: (1) in person four times per week + one hour online (asynchronous) per week; (2) in person three times per week + one hour online (asynchronous) per week; (3) online in asynchronous lessons. For the in-person courses, regular and continued attendance is mandatory.

ITAL 201 - Intermediate Italian: Bel Paese 

Supervised by Claudia Ventura 

Bel Paese or “beautiful country,” is the classical epithet for Italy because of its cultural heritage and natural endowment. In this course, you will explore a cornerstone of Italy’s beauty, the cities of art, with their magnificent piazzas, churches and palaces, traditional eateries and markets, and modern nightlife venues. By interpreting authentic multimedia material, participating in discussions, and writing various texts, you will improve your ability to narrate, express opinions, and establish causal relationships in Italian. You will explore and practice implementing these skills as you develop an Italian Portfolio where you showcase your greatest strengths and accomplishments. See one student's sample that includes all second-year courses: Portfolio italiano di Madison McDonald

Text: Bel Paese (2022), by Claudia Ventura, PDFs in Canvas.  This course meets in person three times per week + one hour (asynchronous) online. Due to the hybrid model of this course, students should plan to study for about one hour per day and be committed to a self-directed learning environment. Regular and continued attendance is mandatory.

ITAL 301 - Advanced Italian: Contemporary Italy Through Media

Taught by Gerardo Pisacane 

The spread of global platforms such as Netflix, TikTok, and YouTube has brought unprecedented media visibility to Italy, generating great interest in the country's culture and language. How do we problematize the knowledge and understanding of the Italian culture and society presented to the audience by widespread media texts on the web? This course will attempt to answer this question by exploring topics including gender, age, ethnicity, and national and regional identity. Each week, students will engage with screenings, discussions, and hands-on projects about the most popular TV series, YouTube videos, and social media posts presenting the Italian culture. Through an interdisciplinary approach combining media literacy and language studies, students will learn how to read and discuss media texts critically. 

ITAL 152 - Italian Cinema: Desire and Resistance (online course) 

Taught by Sergio Rigoletto

How can cinema visualize forms of resistance against oppression and tyranny? How can films enable us to imagine alternative futures? In this course, you will explore Italian cinema history in relation to national and global struggles for social justice and equality. You will also discover how Italian filmmakers fought to defend their cultural heritage against the imperialistic aspirations of Hollywood Studios. Through class discussions and presentations, the course will enable students to justify the claim made by many film scholars for whom Italian cinema was the most influential national cinema of the 20th century. This course fulfills the GP requirement, and it is conducted online in English.

ITAL 317 - Made First in Italy: From Middle Ages to Renaissance

Taught by Lauretta De Renzo

Italian Medieval and Renaissance literature’s legacy is vibrant and ever-present in society. There are two main questions this course will explore and attempt to answer: what do Italian Medieval and Renaissance do (and do first) and how do we understand this period today. This course will examine roughly between 1200-1500 in Italy to understand better the human condition at that time and how that understanding ripples through to today. Together we will read renowned writers like Niccolò Machiavelli and Dante Alighieri and we will also examine important cultural inventions of the time like the banking system and specific art techniques. You will establish an emotional investment in this time period by rendering mastery over the material through creative assignments.


PORTUGUESE

PORT 101: 1st Year Portuguese- Santos

In this course you will be introduced to the fundamental communication skills: understanding, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as to some cultural aspects of the Luso-Brazilian world. The textbook follows the information-based task approach, which springs from the idea that languages are best learned when real-world information becomes the focus of students’ activities. Therefore, during this trimester, you will exchange real-life information about you and your classmates. Class time will be dedicated to communicating in Portuguese using the structures and vocabulary that you have covered prior in the textbook. 

PORT 201: 2nd Year Portuguese- Santos

In this course you will be reinforcing and building upon the fundamental communication skills acquired in first-year Portuguese. Students will be able to practice more complex grammar structures and improve your reading and speaking abilities. The organization of the course follows the information-based task approach, which springs from the idea that languages are best learned when real-world information becomes the focus of students’ activities. Therefore, during this term, besides exchanging real-life information about you and your classmates you will also read and discuss more about Brazilian and Lusophone culture. Class time will be dedicated to communicating in Portuguese using the structures and vocabulary that you have covered previously in assigned readings. Please note: Students and instructor will be communicating only in Portuguese! 

PORT 301: Cultura e Lingua: Expressoes Artisticas- Santos

Develops advanced language skills through the study of key representations in Brazilian art, literature, film, and music. Taught in Portuguese. Prereq: PORT 203 or equivalent. Offered alternate years.

Prereq: PORT 203 or equivalent. 


SPANISH

SPAN 101: First-Year Spanish- Various

Emphasis on the development of speaking, reading, and writing skills; introduction to Hispanic culture. Sequence. Conducted in Spanish. 

SPAN 201: Second-Year Spanish- Various

Continued development of Spanish-language skills, emphasis on diversity of Hispanic cultures. Sequence. Conducted in Spanish. 

SPAN 218: Latino Heritage I

Latino Heritage I is an intermediate course designed for students with a personal, familial, or community connection to Spanish (taught in Spanish and Spanglish). Together we explore cultural production from many Spanish-speaking communities, with a focus on U.S. Latinx cultures.  Students build upon their communicative skills in Spanish working with poetry, short stories, songs, articles, local historical archives, and their own stories, examining la conexión entre bilingüismo e identidad and creating a learning community in which to consider concepts such as intuitive grammar and linguistic social justice. This course cannot be combined with SPAN 201, 202, 203 for more than 15 credits of second-year Spanish. See SHL page for more details. 

SPAN 301: Cultura y lengua: identidades hispanas

Develops advanced language skills through analysis of major historical influences in the cultures of Spanish-speaking regions: Spain, Latin America, and the United States. 

SPAN 303: Cultura y lengua: expresiones artísticas

Expresiones Artísticas focuses on the varied artistic expressions (including but not limited to fine arts, photography, film, popular art, literature, and music) with the goal of broadening the student's knowledge and understanding of the cultures, history, geography, and other related areas of the Spanish-speaking world. These objectives will be achieved through reading and analyzing cultural and literary texts, examining and interpreting works of art, and research and discussion of related topics.

SPAN 305: Cultura y lengua: cambios sociales- 

Nuestro curso tiene por objetivo capacitar al alumno, alumna o alumne para comprender textos literarios, reflexiones teóricas, ensayos y entrevistas sobre problemáticas recurrentes en América Latina. Se espera que al término del curso el estudiante sea capaz de redactar sus ideas con relativa claridad y precisión y que pueda expresarse de manera coherente en lengua castellana. Nuestro curso cubrirá temas relativos a la explotación económica, la ecología, las revoluciones y revueltas sociales, los movimientos indígenas, las luchas por la tolerancia, las prácticas divergentes, la identidad, el feminismo, el arte y la memoria. Nuestra aproximación cultural a los cambios sociales experimentados en el último siglo y parte de lo que lleva el presente, busca dar una visión global de los procesos históricos de transformación social y su objetivo es entregar marcos de referencia contextual para interpretar de mejor manera la dinámica de los cambios sociales experimentados en América Latina y el mundo occidental. En este curso leeremos poemas, cuentos, ensayos, entrevistas y reflexiones teóricas. Veremos además videos y películas a fin de ilustrar de mejor manera la materia de nuestro estudio.  

SPAN 308: Comunidades Bilingues

Develops advanced language skills through the analysis of social and linguistic dynamics of communities in Spain, Latin America, and the United States where Spanish encounters another language. Taught in Spanish. Sequence with SPAN 301, 303, 305. 

SPAN 311. Advanced Writing in Spanish - Zunterstein

This requirement for the Spanish major provides additional language development for students early in the major, emphasizing academic writing skills in Spanish.Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308.

SPAN 312: Spanish in the Media - Rothgery

Designed for heritage learners. Examines the role of Spanish in various forms of media such as television, Internet, and literature. Students practice advanced writing skills necessary to participate in argumentative writing and close textual readings. Prereq: any two from SPAN 301, 303, 305 or 308; SPAN 308 is recommended.  

SPAN 320: Intensive Spanish Grammar Review - Zunterstein

Review and development of the more complex aspects of Spanish grammar with special attention to idiomatic usage. Prereq: SPAN 203 or 228.

SPAN 322: Introduction to Spanish Linguistics – Devin Grammon

Linguists are social scientists who seek answers to questions related to our knowledge and use of language. For example, what is "language" and how is it different from "a language" like Spanish? How do we organize sounds, words, and sentences when we communicate? How did Spanish evolve over time and develop in different places? How does the social context influence how we speak? SPAN 322 introduces students to the major subfields of Hispanic Linguistics in relation to these questions. Readings and in-class activities will focus on phonetics and phonology (the study of sounds), morphology (the study of words), syntax (the study of phrases and sentences) and linguistic variation (history of Spanish, language contact, dialectology, and sociolinguistics). In addition to being active participants in class, students will compete several homework assignments and actively reflect on the relevance of linguistic concepts in daily life. Prereq: SPAN 308; one course from SPAN 301, SPAN 303, SPAN 305, SPAN 311, SPAN 312. 

SPAN 324: Spanish Pronunciation and Phonetics - 

Study of Spanish sounds, rhythms, and intonation; supervised pronunciation practice. Prereq: SPAN 308; one course from SPAN 301, SPAN 303, SPAN 305, SPAN 311, SPAN 312.

SPAN 342 Hispanic Cultures through Literature II- Jesús Sepúlveda

El objetivo de este curso es entregar una visión panorámica de la literatura precolombina, hispanoamericana y peninsular desde el siglo XV al siglo XVIII. Para ello el estudiante leerá textos precolombinos, indianos, renacentistas, pastoriles, barrocos e ilustrados, explorando una variedad de géneros y estilos. Las lecturas de este curso incluyen poemas, epístolas, fragmentos de novelas cortas, piezas dramáticas y comedias que dan cuenta del proceso transatlántico de formación histórica de la hispanidad en tanto fenómeno cultural, social, político y estético. Nuestro estudio comenzará con el mito maya de la creación y la cruzada colonizadora para luego abarcar el Siglo de Oro español, el barroco peninsular y latinoamericano, y concluir con una visión panorámica de la Ilustración. El estudiante verá además filmes y documentales que le permitirán apreciar la literatura de estos siglos en su contexto. Se espera que cada estudiante sea capaz de explicar su punto de vista de manera crítica, articulando por escrito sus ideas a la luz de los textos leídos. Por lo mismo, se espera que el estudiante sea capaz de leer e interpretar textos en castellano, situándolos en sus contextos históricos, geográficos y culturales.   

SPAN 343: Hispanic Cultures through Literature III: Revolutions in the 19th-20th century – Lanie Millar

What makes people rise up and fight to transform their political and social realities? How do revolutionary ideas move around the world and find new expressions in new places? How do communities think about themselves and their future after revolutionary transformations have taken place? In this class, we will learn about Hispanic world through cultural texts written as the Spanish Empire collapsed over the course of the nineteenth century and into the beginning of the twentieth.  We will read essays, poems, and short stories accompanied by art and other visual culture. In the process, we will learn about how Spanish and Latin American ideas about community, self, and other changed as Latin America formed new nations, including the place of the enslaved, racial others, and women in the fast-changing world of the former Spanish empire. In addition to becoming familiar with historical and cultural debates of the time, we will practice how to write and talk about cultural texts, and how to frame our reactions to them.  Language of instruction is Spanish.

SPAN 344: Hispanic Cultures through Literature IV - Pedro García-Caro

Este Panorama de las culturas hispanas a través de la literatura (1898-presente) ofrece una aproximación a los principales movimientos literarios y a los creadores más destacados de los últimos ciento veinte años en Hispanoamérica y España.

Esta visión panorámica desde la independencia de Cuba hasta nuestros días trata de reconocer y estudiar temas constantes de la literatura hispana contemporánea, como los conflictos sociales o la (inter)dependencia cultural entre centro y periferia, y pautas históricas, como la explotación social y económica y la problemática relación entre creador y sociedad, entre el texto y el tejido social. 

Las interpretaciones y discusiones de las diferentes lecturas de cada semana girarán en torno a estos temas amplios, y buscarán que el estudiante desarrolle al mismo tiempo una visión detallada tanto de las estrategias creativas, lingüísticas o textuales como del tejido social: el contexto histórico y geopolítico en el que surge cada texto.

SPAN 348: Nobody’s Panic: memoria histórica y derecho al future - Analisa Taylor

This course examines the stories and strategies through which Chicanx and Latinx writers, artists, and activists working in the 1960s and beyond conceptualize the project of decolonization—not only from the legacies of Spanish and Anglo-American settler colonialism in greater Mesoamérica but also from the border militarization and racialized social construction of undocumentedness and labor precarity in service to global capital today. Our objectives include identifying how these “narratives of rightful belonging” (Amalia Mesa-Baines) use historical, archaeological, ethnographic, linguistic, cartographic, and other methods to counter mainstream U.S. constructions of Mexicanness and other Latinx identities as out-of-place; exploring how they help us see our own family and community histories in a new light; and showing how they relate to the stories and strategies of resistance to settler colonialism and border imperialism (Harsha Walia) among other communities around the world. 

SPAN 350: Introducción a la Poesía – Canción y Letra - Leah Middlebrook

This intermediate-level Spanish course helps students expand their knowledge of Hispanic and Latin American culture through studies in poetry and music. Working between poems composed as literature and poems composed as song lyrics, in genres such as rap, reggaeton, rock, and canción de autor, we will talk together about the poetic and the lyric as varieties of discourse, what those discourses enable, and what they show us about human experience, individual and collective. Students can expect to expand their skills in Spanish-language conversation and written expression. We will also develop vocabularies relevant to poetry, from technical terms (el poema, la estrofa, el verso, la metáfora, etc.) through ways to talk about the feelings, reactions, experiences, and questions that poems stir up.

SPAN 407/507: ¡#FUE EL ESTADO! in Mexican Film and Literature - Analisa Taylor

This course examines how a series of dramatic and documentary films, critical essays, and other forms of cultural production conceptualize and communicate the substance and presence of the state in contemporary Mexican society and beyond. Our primary materials share in chronicling the lives and stories of people whose understanding of the state as perpetrator of fraud, corruption, and violence comes from their own lived experience and from having borne witness to others’ lived experience. Placing these films and other materials in dialogue with one another will allow us to articulate the social conditions of possibility in which the term “¡Fue el Estado!” has come to make collective sense as an interrupter of the state’s cover-up narratives regarding its role in the detention and forced disappearance of forty-three students from the Escuela Normal Rural de Ayotzinapa in 2013 and many other atrocities before and since. 

SPAN 420/520: Top Language Contact (Grammon)

 

SPAN 428: Spanish in the U. S. - Grammon

Is Latino a racial category?  Why do people get so mad when they hear “para español, oprima nueve?” Is Oregon a Spanish word? Does mixing English and Spanish actually ruin my grammar? Is Spanish a threat to our national unity? Does raising a child in Spanish at home hinder their ability to learn English? Is “Latinx” gentrifying Spanish? Don’t they speak like Don Quixote Spanish in New Mexico? Is Spanglish even a language? Why is it problematic to say, “el cheapo”? Does Spanish have a future in the U.S.? In SPAN 428, we will explore various answers to these and other questions through critical readings and discussions of assigned texts and media. Our goal is to develop a critical awareness of the myths, discourses and ideologies that inform the past, present, and future of Spanish in the United States. In addition to active participation in class activities and discussions, students are responsible for completing reading quizzes, reflection papers, and a mini research project on a topic of their choosing. Prereq: two from SPAN 320, SPAN 322, SPAN 324.

Speaking of “stirring up”: Students should be aware that we will be working with powerful themes in this course: love, death, violence, gender, identity, race, ethnicity, politics, oppression, and resistance. Our job as a community will be to carry on thoughtful, productive discussion of these themes. Language of instruction is Spanish.

SPAN 490/590: Top Idea of Latin America (García Caro)

This advanced seminar considers different intellectual debates over the concept of Latin America. What defines the “Latin” in Latin America? How is Latin America configured in contrast with Anglo America, but also with other alternate mappings and concepts such as Meso-America, South America, or Abya Yala? The course of readings and discussions is clearly divided into five interrelated but discrete parts corresponding to two-week periods: a first section considers epistemological issues and their interrelation with cartography, colonization and competing cultural traditions, we will read widely from early chronicles to contemporary cultural historians’ discussions about the epistemic crises provoked by conquest and colonization. The second section explores ontologies and their relation to etymologies (nominalism), neocolonialism, pan Americanism, nation-building and other discussions about identity, among other concepts that advance competing definitions of (Latin)Americanism, the central philosophical, political, or aesthetic quest at the center of the seminar. In the third two-week period, we will look into bio-politics and well-established as we as current discussions about race and racism as they interface Latin America. In the fourth section, we will read Jorge Luis Borges for a discussion about the role of aesthetics and cultural production in the understanding of hemispheric historical specificities and the development of alternate sites of philosophical discussions. During the last section we will consider the novel by Roberto Bolaño, Estrella distante to engage in a discussion about ethics and the need to understand the work of art in the historical and political context in which it is produced.


Romance Languages

RL 407-507: Women talk to Women – Leah Middlebrook

This course examines scenes of women in conversation in literary, visual, and cinematic texts from the Hispanic, Anglophone, Francophone and Italophone worlds (the concepts of “world” and “worlding” will be discussed in our class). We will explore tensions between “woman” as a biological category and the construction of ideologies and tropes of womanhood and femininity over the course of social, political, and economic modernity by considering how select narratives, circulated, and elaborated in the sixteenth-, seventeenth-, eighteenth- and nineteenth centuries, shape conventions about women and womanhood we encounter today. Writers, artists, and theorists considered include Ovid, Fernando de Rojas, Christine De Pizan, Francesco Petrarca, Louise Labé, Marguerite de Navarre, Miguel de Cervantes, María de Zayas, Moderata Fonte, Veronica Franco, Louise Bourgeois, Cheri Moraga, María Lugones. The language of instruction in this course is English; however, students are encouraged to read and write in the language of their choosing. In order to receive MA or Major credit in FR, ITAL, or SPAN, it is necessary to complete all written assignments in the target language. Students seeking credit toward the Minor in those languages should confirm with their advisor and the instructor. Please note that as this is a 400/500 level course, students should be prepared to take on the extensive reading and class preparation necessary for a solid, vigorous seminar J.

Contact Leah Middlebrook with questions (middlebr@uoregon.edu).

RL 636: Teaching and Learning Romance Languages - Robert L Davis 

This course provides specialized, pre-professional training in the teaching of Romance languages (French, Italian, and Spanish) to adults. The class readings, lectures, discussions, and portfolio activities will help you to:  

  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of major concepts and the historical context of the field of language learning and teaching in the U.S.; 
  • apply general L2 learning research to the particular problems of learning Romance languages; 
  • design and implement a complete instructional sequence for new material, with attention to sequencing of activities, learning styles, and modes of communication (presentational, interpretive, interpersonal); 
  • personalize instruction for a diverse group of learners, with different motivations and interests in language study; 
  • utilize effectively and appropriately a range of technologies for the second language classroom; and  
  • reflect on your own professional practice and by analyzing and evaluating your own teaching and that of your peers. 

WINTER 2023

FRENCH

FR 102: First-Year French- Various

Introduction to French stressing the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a communicative approach. Sequence. Conducted in French. 

FR 111: Intensive Beginning French- Various

Intensive study for experienced language learners (ex: took French during High School). Introduction to French culture. Prereq for 111: previous study of French or competence in another Romance language.

FR 112: Intensive Beginning French- Various

Intensive study for experienced language learners (ex: took French during High School). Introduction to French culture. Prereq for 112: successful completion of FR 111

FR 202: Second-Year French- Various

Development of reading, writing, and speaking skills; study of short literary and cultural texts; considerable attention paid to oral use of the language. Prereq for 201: first-year language competence. 

FR 203: Second-Year French- Various

Development of reading, writing, and speaking skills; study of short literary and cultural texts; considerable attention paid to oral use of the language. Prereq for 201 and 202: first-year language competence. 

FR 302: Contemporary Francophone World - 4 credits Géraldine Poizat-Newcomb

This course would explore the richness and variety of Francophone cultures in the Caribbean, North America, Africa and Southeast Asia, with a particular emphasis on North Africa and Sub-Saharan Africa. We would use literary, journalistic, artistic and audiovisual materials to analyze the cultural legacies of colonialism and the complexities of evolving national identities in the French-speaking world today. 

FR 312: French Survey: Francophone Literature - 4 Credits- André Djiffack 

Introduction to major authors and texts of the French-speaking world outside of France. 

Prescribed Book: Gaasch and Budig-Markin, Diversité 

FR 330: Poésie française - 4 credits - Fabienne MooreL’objectif du cours est d’étudier la poésie française à travers le temps dans toute sa richesse, sa beauté et sa diversité. A travers de nombreuses analyses textuelles, nous mettrons en lumière les aspects essentiels, formels et thématiques, de la poétique française. Lectures, exercices, exposés et devoirs écrits vous permettront d’améliorer votre français écrit et oral et de vous familiariser avec la tradition poétique française et ses plus grands auteurs. Lectures, discussions et travaux écrits seront tous effectués en français.

FR 407: Guerre dans la BD - 4 credits - Fabienne Moore

Bien que la France, la Belgique et la Suisse aient l’une des plus anciennes et des plus influentes traditions de bande dessinée, l’étude de cette forme artistique narrative est entravée par des préjugés sur sa popularité, sa facilité, sa superficialité et son public de jeunes lecteurs. Pour récuser ces perceptions, ce cours se concentre sur les représentations de la guerre dans la bande dessinée francophone: nous étudierons plusieurs conflits: guerre de Crimée, Commune de Paris, guerres coloniales en Algérie et au Congo; la Première et la Deuxième guerre mondiale; conflits en Amérique du Nord et du Sud. Nous examinerons comment et pourquoi artistes et auteurs les ont représentées “graphiquement.” Nous étudierons l’esthétique d’auteurs/artistes qui ont inventé des icônes telles que Tintin, Astérix et Obélix, et nous lirons des œuvres contemporaines majeures (Ferrandez, Tardi, Comès). L’objectif du cours est d’améliorer votre expression française orale et écrite, de communiquer vos idées critiques grâce à un genre qui défie le canon littéraire tout en étant incroyablement expressif. Nous découvrirons une nouvelle façon de “dire” l’histoire de l’identité francophone et l’histoire de ses forces et faiblesses en temps de guerre.

FR 416: Advanced Writing in French - 4 credits- Géraldine Poizat-NewcombEven if you don't like writing, you should have some fun in this class! With writing tips from a user-friendly textbook, it offers a variety of activities: in-depth text examination, weekly playful creative writing, and the step-by-step creation of a research essay about a topic that is of genuine interest to you. We aim to end the class with a clear, coherent, interesting paper (in some cases, publishable) written with a reader-oriented mind. Throughout the term, we study how to choose a topic, how to present a claim, how to find and use sources, and how to organize and support our ideas in a clear, attractive, convincing manner – all useful skills, in and out of the classroom! Conducted in French. 

FR 490/590: Césaire, Fanon, Glissant - 4 Credits - André Djiffack 

Le décryptage de la littérature postcoloniale repose essentiellement sur la théorie de base formulée par trois intellectuels majeurs du monde noir que sont Césaire, Fanon et Glissant. Dans ce séminaire, nous allons explorer les œuvres canoniques de ces penseurs qui balisent et structurent la réflexion sur le drame de l’humanité africaine depuis l’esclavage jusqu’à la départementalisation, en transitant par la colonisation.  

 Prescribed books :

  • Aimé Césaire : Une tempête, Paris, Seuil 
  • Aimé Césaire : Discours sur le colonialisme, Présence Africaine 
  • Frantz Fanon : Les Damnés de la terre, Paris, La Découverte 
  • Frantz Fanon : Peau noire, masques blancs, Paris,  
  • Edouard, Glissant, Le Discours antillais, Paris, Seuil,  
  • Edouard Glissant, La Case du Commandeur, Paris, Seuil

ITALIAN

ITAL 102 - Elementary Italian: Italian Holidays and Traditions

Supervised by Lauretta De Renzo

Italians take their centuries-old traditions very seriously, celebrating them with gusto and pride. You will discover some of Italy’s most colorful and iconic festivities such as the Befana in Rome and Urbania, the Carnival of Venice and Siena’s spirited Palio, while increasing your proficiency in Italian. As you hone your skills, you will be invited to reflect upon your personal learning goals, processes, and outcomes. While advancing in your ability to effectively communicate in Italian, you will develop a collaborative presentation on a traditional festival of your choice.

Workload: This course is offered in two formats: in presence 4 times per week + 1 hour online per week. Due to the hybrid model of this course, students should plan to study about one hour per day and be committed to a self-directed learning environment. Regular and continued attendance is mandatory. 

ITAL 202 - Intermediate Italian: Italian Excellence- Supervised by Claudia Ventura

Italian culture is steeped in the arts, fashion, music, and food. Home of major centers of the Renaissance art and craftsmanship on the Italian peninsula has flourished for centuries. In this course, you will analyze contemporary Made in Italy production in fashion, furniture design, high tech, and music. We also will discover the Italians behind the ‘Made in Italy’ brand as well as genius minds such as Galileo and Leonardo. By interpreting multimedia material, participating in discussions, and writing various texts, you will improve your ability to narrate, compare and contrast, express opinions, and establish causal relationships in Italian. You will explore and practice implementing these skills as you develop an Italian Portfolio where you showcase your greatest strengths and accomplishments. See one student's sample.

Workload: This course meets in person 3 times per week +1 hour (asynchronous) online. Due to the hybrid model of this course, students should plan to study for about one hour per day and be committed to a self-directed learning environment. Regular and continued attendance is mandatory.

Texts: Italian Excellence (2023), by Claudia Ventura, PDFs in Canvas.

ITAL 319 - Eco-Italy: Introduction to the Green Humanities- Diana Garvin

This interdisciplinary course bridges the arts and the sciences, introducing you to human-land relationships across Southern Italy and North Africa. Together, we will explore the Green Humanities in the greater Mediterranean: we will analyze activist artwork inspired by earthquakes and volcanoes.  We will read investigative reporting on the eco-mafia and discuss the meaning of their slogan, “Trash is Gold.” Materials emphasize long-form journalism and documentary film because these forms of writing and filmmaking craft compelling stories to support sustainability across government and industry. So too do assignments: you will create an online portfolio exploring environmental themes, including a weekly photojournal, a mini-podcast series, and a YouTube video. By the end of this course, you will be able to speak about ecological phenomena in vivid, human terms.


PORTUGUESE

PORT 102: 1st Year Portuguese- Santos

In this course you will be introduced to the fundamental communication skills: understanding, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as to some cultural aspects of the Luso-Brazilian world. The textbook follows the information-based task approach, which springs from the idea that languages are best learned when real-world information becomes the focus of students’ activities. Therefore, during this trimester, you will exchange real-life information about you and your classmates. Class time will be dedicated to communicating in Portuguese using the structures and vocabulary that you have covered prior in the textbook. 

PORT 202: 2nd Year Portuguese- Santos

In this course you will be reinforcing and building upon the fundamental communication skills acquired in first-year Portuguese. Students will be able to practice more complex grammar structures and improve your reading and speaking abilities. The organization of the course follows the information-based task approach, which springs from the idea that languages are best learned when real-world information becomes the focus of students’ activities. Therefore, during this term, besides exchanging real-life information about you and your classmates you will also read and discuss more about Brazilian and Lusophone culture. Class time will be dedicated to communicating in Portuguese using the structures and vocabulary that you have covered previously in assigned readings. Please note: Students and instructor will be communicating only in Portuguese! 

PORT 305: Cultura e lingua: Brasil ontem e hoje- Santos

Introduction to Brazilian history and culture. Topics include geography; indigenous, European, and African presence; trends of authoritarianism and democratization; issues in migration and urbanization; racial and ethnic identities; women’s roles. Taught in Portuguese.

Prereq: PORT 203 or equivalent.


SPANISH

SPAN 102: First-Year Spanish- Various

Emphasis on the development of speaking, reading, and writing skills; introduction to Hispanic culture. Sequence. Conducted in Spanish. 

SPAN 111: Intensive Beginning Spanish

Intensive study for experienced language learners (ex: took Spanish in high school).

Introduction to Hispanic culture. Prereq for 111: previous study of Spanish or competence in another language.

SPAN 202: Second-Year Spanish- Various

Continued development of Spanish-language skills, emphasis on diversity of Hispanic cultures. Sequence. Conducted in Spanish. 

SPAN 218: Latino Heritage I - Various

Latino Heritage II is an intermediate course designed for students with a personal, familial, or community connection to Spanish (taught in Spanish and Spanglish). Together we explore cultural production from many Spanish-speaking communities, with a focus on U.S. Latinx cultures.  Students build upon their communicative skills in Spanish working with poetry, short stories, songs, articles, local historical archives, and their own stories, examining la conexión entre bilingüismo e identidad and creating a learning community in which to consider concepts such as intuitive grammar and linguistic social justice. This course cannot be combined with SPAN 201, 202, 203 for more than 15 credits of second-year Spanish. See SHL page for more details.

SPAN 228: Latino Heritage II- Various

Latino Heritage II is an intermediate course designed for students with a personal, familial, or community connection to Spanish (taught in Spanish and Spanglish). Together we explore cultural production from many Spanish-speaking communities, with a focus on establishing a personal connection between students’ Spanish language heritage and the wider Spanish-speaking world. Students build upon their communicative skills in Spanish working with poetry, short stories, songs, articles, and their own stories, examining la conexión entre bilingüismo e identidad and creating a learning community in which to consider concepts such as resistance through music and linguistic social justice. Sequence with SPAN 218; cannot be combined with SPAN 201, 202, 203 for more than 15 credits of second-year Spanish. See SHL page for more details.

SPAN 301: Cultura y lengua: identidades hispanas - Various

Develops advanced language skills through analysis of major historical influences in the cultures of Spanish-speaking regions: Spain, Latin America, and the United States. 

SPAN 303: Cultura y lengua: expresiones artísticas - Various

Develops advanced language skills through the study of cultural products (e.g., art, literature, film, music) in Spanish-speaking societies. 

SPAN 305: Cultura y lengua: cambios sociales - Various

Develops advanced language skills through the investigation of major currents of change in modern Spanish-speaking societies, gender issues, technology, revolution, and counterrevolution. 

SPAN 308: Comunidades Bilingues - Various

Develops advanced language skills through the analysis of social and linguistic dynamics of communities in Spain, Latin America, and the United States where Spanish encounters another language. Taught in Spanish. Sequence with SPAN 301, 303, 305. 

SPAN 311: Advanced Writing in Spanish - Rothgery

This requirement for the Spanish major provides additional language development for students early in the major, emphasizing academic writing skills in Spanish.Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308.

SPAN 312: Spanish in the Media – Zunterstein

Designed for heritage learners. Examines the role of Spanish in various forms of media such as television, Internet, and literature. Students practice advanced writing skills necessary to participate in argumentative writing and close textual readings to prepare them for participation in diverse discourse communities. Prereq: any two from SPAN 301, 303, 305 or 308; SPAN 308 is recommended.  

SPAN 320: Intensive Spanish Grammar Review- Various

Review and development of the more complex aspects of Spanish grammar with special attention to idiomatic usage.

SPAN 324: Pronunciation and Phonetics -Sergio Loza

This course offers students an introduction to the Spanish phonetic system and its main dialects, which includes key definitions and analytical skills crucial to understanding the Hispanophone phonetic system. In order to be able to understand the dialectal variation of how Spanish is pronounced around the world, students must first learn the basics of phonetics which includes learning key concepts of how sounds are produced and how such sounds work together to create "meaning."

Additionally, students strengthen not only their understanding of how speech is produced, but also their abilities to perceive sociophonetic variation through hands-on practice.  This course also provides a rich cultural context to critically contextualize and examine issues related to phonetics and the various dialects of the Hispanophone world. 

SPAN 342: Hispanic Cultures through Literature II- Sepulveda

El objetivo de este curso es entregar una visión panorámica de la literatura precolombina, hispanoamericana y peninsular desde el siglo XV al siglo XVIII. Para ello el estudiante leerá textos precolombinos, indianos, renacentistas, pastoriles, barrocos e ilustrados, explorando una variedad de géneros y estilos. Las lecturas de este curso incluyen poemas, epístolas, fragmentos de novelas cortas, piezas dramáticas y comedias que dan cuenta del proceso transatlántico de formación histórica de la hispanidad en tanto fenómeno cultural, social, político y estético. Nuestro estudio comenzará con el mito maya de la creación y la cruzada colonizadora para luego abarcar el Siglo de Oro español, el barroco peninsular y latinoamericano, y concluir con una visión panorámica de la Ilustración. El estudiante verá además filmes y documentales que le permitirán apreciar la literatura de estos siglos en su contexto. Se espera que cada estudiante sea capaz de explicar su punto de vista de manera crítica, articulando por escrito sus ideas a la luz de los textos leídos. Por lo mismo, se espera que el estudiante sea capaz de leer e interpretar textos en castellano, situándolos en sus contextos históricos, geográficos y culturales.  

SPAN 343: Hispanic Cultures through Literature III- Paulo Henriquez 

This class introduces students to a variety of literary works from Latin American Independences to the Spanish Civil War, with emphasis on their relationship to historical events and critical representation of Iberian and Latin American societies.The “long nineteenth century” is the century of crisis, flanked by revolutions, transformations and wars. We will cover from the Wars of Independence in Latin America and the Napoleonic Wars in the Iberian Peninsula to the Spanish Civil War. We will study changes in the key concepts that articulate 19th and early 20th century debates in a Transatlantic framework, without losing sight of the intellectual context that runs parallel to the changes in these concepts: revolution and freedom, nation building and subject formation, civilization, progress, national identity (creole identity, subaltern identities, “Spanishness” and “casticismo”), democracy, modernity, modernization. Among other topics, will trace: the colonial legacy in the hegemonic nation building projects of the intellectual liberal elites; the conflict between lettered elites and popular masses; bourgeois revolutions; imperial nostalgia for the lost colonies; building of national identity in Spain; the inextricability of fiction from politics; aesthetic innovations at the brink of the Spanish civil war.

Span 350: Introducción a la Poesía – Cecilia Enjuto Rangel

En este curso estudiaremos la poesía en múltiples épocas y países, desde poemas náhuas y jarchas medievales hasta poemas barrocos, románticos, vanguardistas, y poesía contemporánea en forma de rap o canciones en España y América Latina. Estudiaremos cómo los textos literarios dialogan con sus contextos históricos y culturales. Nuestras discusiones también se concentrarán en el análisis formal de los poemas. En el transcurso del trimestre trabajaremos para lograr escribir ensayos bien estructurados y con lecturas críticas originales. Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308.

SPAN 355: Escritura creativa en lengua castellana / Creative Writing in Spanish - Sepulveda

Este curso busca potenciar las capacidades creativas de los estudiantes de español a través de variados ejercicios de escritura. Durante el trimestre los estudiantes desarrollarán su sensibilidad poética y literaria, así como también su juicio crítico e interpretativo mediante sesiones de taller y discusión grupal. Se espera que cada estudiante escriba sus propios poemas y cuentos según sea su interés, siguiendo los lineamientos formales entregados por el profesor. El estudiante realizará cinco ejercicios de escritura dirigida y leerá obras literarias que sean pertinentes a sus proyectos individuales. Al término del curso cada estudiante deberá entregar un conjunto de escritos poéticos y/o narrativos originales que den cuenta de su trabajo creativo durante el trimestre. Durante la última semana de clases se realizará una lectura pública dirigida a la comunidad universitaria e hispanohablante del estado de Oregón.  

SPAN 424/524: Historia del español/ History of the Spanish Language – Robert Davis

Descripción. En esta clase estudiaremos el desarrollo lingüístico de la lengua española y las influencias sociales e históricas que lo determinaron: las raíces en el latín popular del Imperio Romano, las influencias visigodas y musulmanas, la época clásica y un resumen de la diversidad de los dialectos modernos peninsulares y americanos. Trataremos también el fenómeno de contacto entre el español y otras lenguas. 

Objetivos. Al terminar esta clase, los estudiantes podrán: 

• trazar la historia de la lengua española identificando los períodos principales de su desarrollo

• diferenciar textos escritos de los diferentes períodos citando los rasgos llamativos de cada época

• identificar las ideologías lingüísticas que caracterizan las dinámicas de poder social en cada época de la evolución del español

• explicar el papel de la variación lingüística (geográfica y social) en la evolución de una lengua

• distinguir los diferentes geolectos del español moderno e identificar los cambios lingüísticos históricos que llevan a su diferenciación

• identificar los cambios lingüísticos históricos más importantes (asimilación, epéntesis, etc.) y citar ejemplos de cada uno de la historia del español.

Linguistic changes and social-historical influences on the development of Spanish from its roots in Latin to the diversity of modern dialects. Prereq: Two from SPAN 320, 322, 324.

SPAN 448/548: Analisa Taylor

SPAN 607: Spectrality, Memory and the Child in Iberian and Latin American Cinema - Cecilia Enjuto Rangel

In Latin American and Iberian cinema there is a strong, growing trend that privileges the children’s gaze in the reconstruction of the historical and the political memory of war and dictatorships. We will explore how this trend, which has recently sparked particular attention by cultural critics, has changed our ways of remembering, of coming to terms with the multiple generational gaps, and played a crucial cultural and political role in the transitions to democracy. The trend can be traced back to the sixties and the seventies with classics in Mexico as En el balcón vacío (1962) and in Spain, El espíritu de la colmena (1973). But as it is evident, most of the films that have children as the protagonists telling their stories in the midst of war or totalitarian regimes are also the product of the cultural politics of memory during the return to democracy in Spain and Latin America. The spectators are asked to empathize with the children in films in Spain such asLos girasoles ciegos (2008), and Pa negre (2010); as co-productions Mexico and Spain, El espinazo del Diablo (2001), El laberinto del fauno (2006); in France Julie Gavras’s La faute à Fidel!, (Blame it on Fidel!) (2006); as co-production Uruguay, Argentina and Spain, Paisito (2008); in Chile, Machuca (2004); in Argentina, Cordero de Dios (2008), Kamchatka (2002), Cautiva (2003), Infancia clandestina (2011) and in Brasil, O ano em que meus pais saíram de ferias (2006). We will discuss chapters of scholarly works such as Sarah Wright’s The Child in Spanish Cinema (2013), Erin Hogan’s The Two cines con niño: Genre and the Child Protagonist in Over Fifty Years of Spanish Film (1955-2010) (2018) Sarah Thomas’ Inhabiting the In-Between: Childhood and Cinema in Spain’s Long Transition (2019), and Deborah Martin’s The Child in Contemporary Latin American Cinema (2019). In every class, we will discuss one or two films and a few theoretical essays by scholars such as which will present the theoretical framework (Laura Mulvey, Patricia Keller, Avery Gordon, André Bazin, Steven Marsh, Dudley Andrew, Ignacio Sánchez Prado, Laura Podalsky) and as well as essays on the role of filmmaking in the Politics of Memory in the last thirty years.


Romance Languages

RL 407/507: Fascism and Neo-Fascism - Diana Garvin

How do you study something ugly? This course teaches argumentation and empathy in tandem to counteract the divisiveness of Fascist rhetoric. Debate labs show how to appeal to your audience’s logos (head), ethos (gut), and pathos (heart). Two in-class debates give you the opportunity to practice these techniques. Annotation exercises deconstruct Fascist propaganda and speeches, revealing how dictators manipulate emotion to maintain control. Critical reading exercises then extend these lessons to Neo-Fascism, teaching you to distinguish between news entertainment and trustworthy sources. Ultimately, this course teaches how to interpret primary sources and to craft compassionate arguments. Together, these two skills will prepare you to deliver a convincing case for ethical actions in real world scenario.


SPRING 2023

FRENCH

FR 103: First-Year French - Various

Introduction to French stressing the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a communicative approach. Sequence. Conducted in French. 

FR 112: Intensive Beginning French - Various

Intensive study for experienced language learners (ex: took French during High School). Introduction to French culture. Prereq for 112: successful completion of FR 111

FR 201: Second-Year French - Various

Development of reading, writing, and speaking skills; study of short literary and cultural texts; considerable attention paid to oral use of the language. Prereq for 201: first-year language competence. 

FR 203: Second-Year French - Various

Development of reading, writing, and speaking skills; study of short literary and cultural texts; considerable attention paid to oral use of the language. Prereq for 201: first-year language competence. 

FR 307: Oral Skills - 2 credits - Fabienne MoorePenser le monde qui change. S’exprimer en français sur mes idées, mes rêves, mes projets, mes espoirs et mes sentiments sur le monde qui vient. Le français n’est pas juste une langue utilitaire pour obtenir ou faire quelque chose mais une langue pour aider à penser ce qu’on sent et pour sentir autrement.

Dix semaines consacrées à dix valeurs positives: la communication, la collectivité, la localité, la joie, le bien-être, le travail, l’art, la nature, l’amour, le don. Autour de chaque valeur : du vocabulaire concret et abstrait, des expressions idiomatiques, des jeux de rôles, des extraits de journaux télévisés, des chansons, des poèmes, des conversations à plusieurs, des moments d’expression libre. L’objectif est de pratiquer et d’améliorer la compréhension du français oral et l’expression orale. Communiquons en français pour vivre mieux, ici et maintenant, et pour imaginer positivement le monde qui vient et notre contribution. 

FR 312: French Survey: Francophone Literature - 4 Credits - André Djiffack

Introduction to major authors and texts of the French-speaking world outside of France. 

Prescribed Book, Gaasch and Budig-Markin, Diversité 

FR 317: French Survey: Middle Ages and Renaissance - 4 credits - Géraldine Poizat-Newcomb  

This class focuses on French literature and culture during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. The first half of the course focuses on classical texts from the Middle Ages (Chanson de Roland, Roman de Renart, fabliaux, folk tales and poetry) while the second half explores the prose works of Marguerite de Navarre, Rabelais and Montaigne. The course combines close readings of those texts with a discussion of the socio-political, cultural, artistic, and historical conditions of their times.  

FR 333: French Narrative - 4 Credits - André Djiffack

In this class, students will analyze critically La Peste, by Albert Camus, a Nobel Prize winner (1957). Studying this novel will help them understand the Covid-19 Pandemic in deeper and more complex manner. 

FR 407: The Tao of Montaigne - 4 credits Géraldine Poizat-Newcomb 

Montaigne lived at the time of Shakespeare, but he asked the same questions we ponder today: What is human nature? Is intelligence a blessing or a curse? How can I calm my fear of death? What religion should I follow? Is empathy a weakness? What is a good life?

We study excerpts from Montaigne’s Essays along with texts and videos by modern-day teachers like Eckhart Tolle, Pema Chodron, Byron Katie and Thich Nhat Hanh, as well as poems from the Tao Te Ching and the Sufi tradition. 

The class has an experiential component, with a different meditation practice every week, and an emphasis on group discussion.  Readings, writing and discussion in modern French. 


ITALIAN

ITAL 103 - Elementary Italian: Portrays of Italy

Supervised by Lauretta De Renzo

Through snapshots of Italian society, you will explore how the past and the present are closely intertwined in Italian culture and how this affects Italian lifestyle. By examining a variety of media (videos, photos, articles, websites, a short story, etc.), you will learn about the stile italiano.  You will also advance on your Italian proficiency by extending your oral and written interpersonal and presentational skills as well as your interpretive skills.

Workload: This course is offered in two formats: in presence 4 times per week + 1 hour online per week. Due to the hybrid model of this course, students should plan to study about one hour per day and be committed to a self-directed learning environment. Regular and continued attendance is mandatory.

ITAL 152 - Modern Italian History Through Food

Taught by Diana Garvin

This course uses food as a lens to introduce you to modern Italian history, from Unification in 1871 to the present day. Lectures explore topics like the birth of Neapolitan pizza, Futurist food, and the G-8 pesto debate. To encourage lively conversations between students, each lecture also includes four, 10-minute discussion labs. Labs provide time and space to digest the lesson materials, and also offer a small group setting where you can get to know your classmates. Using the digital collections of the Barilla Gastronomic Library, you and your classmates will analyze cookbooks, recipes, and menus alongside Italian novels and films. You will even engage in the culinary arts yourself, bringing historical photographs and recipes to life with a Futurist food “happening” at the Holy Palate tavern of Milan.

This course fulfills the GP requirement and is conducted in English.  

ITAL 203 - Intermediate Italian: One Italy, Many Italies

Supervised by Claudia Ventura 

Globalization and immigration seem to carry new challenges for Italy’s socio-economic stability.  By examining infographics and data as well as personal stories and participating in discussions, you will explore current social phenomena such as young adults' unemployment, LGBTQ rights, and immigrant routes in Italy to gain a critical panorama of Italian society. You will also advance further your ability to narrate, compare and contrast, and express opinions in Italian. By the end of this course your spoken and written presentations will include culturally appropriate vocabulary, expressions, and gestures. You will explore and practice implementing these skills as you develop an Italian Portfolio where you showcase your greatest strengths and accomplishments. 

Workload: This course meets in presence 3 times per week + 1 hour online. Due to the hybrid model of this course, students should plan to study about one hour per day and be committed to a self-directed learning environment. Regular and continued attendance is mandatory.

Text: One Italy, Many Italies (2023), PDF in Canvas authored by Claudia Ventura 

ITAL 350 - Global Histories of Italian Food 

Taught by Diana Garvin

The story of Italian food is a tale of global trade, revealing the historic connections between Italy and the world.  Our interdisciplinary course focuses on connecting places and people, both in content and in assignments. Each weekly seminar uses a historical lens to explore the relationship between an Italian city and a different world capital to illustrate how far-flung nations and empires have shaped Italy’s regional cuisines. Modular assignments teach applied skills to build your undergraduate research profile. You start by collaborating with local site visits, with in-person interviews at the UO Urban Farm, Craft Centers, and Jordan Schnitzer Art Museum.  Then, you practice these skills by corresponding with global institutions with Italian food history holdings.  Building better museums, our midterm project, gives you the opportunity to critically review and assess past collecting practices, then build a digital Wunderkammer: a display box where you can model more accurate and inclusive ways to present the past to the public. Your final puts these skills together, as you develop these interview materials into a UROP Humanities Undergraduate Research Fellowship proposal.  By the end of this course, you will have a research network and a fellowship application ready for submission, helping you to launch your professional trajectory into the wider world.


PORTUGUESE

PORT 150: Brazil and Beyond: Cultures of the Portuguese-Speaking World - Lanie Millar

From soccer to samba, the cultures of the Luso-Brazilian world are a result of a long and dynamic history of migration, conflict, and exchange. This class will introduce students to the history and cultures of Portuguese-speaking communities on five continents. We will learn about food, art, music, cinema, and history as we trace the movement of Portuguese-speaking communities around the globe. Language of Instruction will be English.

PORT 103: 1st Year Portuguese - Santos

In this course you will be introduced to the fundamental communication skills: understanding, speaking, reading and writing, as well as to some cultural aspects of the Luso-Brazilian world. The textbook follows the information-based task approach, which springs from the idea that languages are best learned when real-world information becomes the focus of students’ activities. Therefore, during this trimester, you will exchange real-life information about you and your classmates. Class time will be dedicated to communicating in Portuguese using the structures and vocabulary that you have covered prior in the textbook. 

PORT 203: 2nd Year Portuguese - Santos

In this course you will be reinforcing and building upon the fundamental communication skills acquired in first-year Portuguese. Students will be able to practice more complex grammar structures and improve your reading and speaking abilities. The organization of the course follows the information-based task approach, which springs from the idea that languages are best learned when real-world information becomes the focus of students’ activities. Therefore, during this term, besides exchanging real-life information about you and your classmates you will also read and discuss more about Brazilian and Lusophone culture. Class time will be dedicated to communicating in Portuguese using the structures and vocabulary that you have covered previously in assigned readings. Please note: Students and instructor will be communicating only in Portuguese!  


SPANISH

SPAN 103: First-Year Spanish- Various

Emphasis on the development of speaking, reading, and writing skills; introduction to Hispanic culture. Sequence. Conducted in Spanish. 

SPAN 112: Intensive Beginning Spanish

Intensive study for experienced language learners (ex: took Spanish in high school).

Introduction to Hispanic culture. Prereq for 111: previous study of Spanish or competence in another language.

SPAN 203: Second-Year Spanish- Various

Continued development of Spanish-language skills, emphasis on diversity of Hispanic cultures. Sequence. Conducted in Spanish. 

SPAN 228: Latino Heritage II- Various

Latino Heritage II is an intermediate course designed for students with a personal, familial, or community connection to Spanish (taught in Spanish and Spanglish). Together we explore cultural production from many Spanish-speaking communities, with a focus on establishing a personal connection between students’ Spanish language heritage and the wider Spanish-speaking world. Students build upon their communicative skills in Spanish working with poetry, short stories, songs, articles and their own stories, examining la conexión entre bilingüismo e identidad and creating a learning community in which to consider concepts such as resistance through music and linguistic social justice. Sequence with SPAN 218; cannot be combined with SPAN 201, 202, 203 for more than 15 credits of second-year Spanish. See SHL page for more details.

SPAN 301: Cultura y lengua: identidades hispanas - Various

Develops advanced language skills through analysis of major historical influences in the cultures of Spanish-speaking regions: Spain, Latin America, and the United States. 

SPAN 303: Cultura y lengua: expresiones artísticas - Various

Develops advanced language skills through the study of cultural products (e.g., art, literature, film, music) in Spanish-speaking societies. 

SPAN 305: Cultura y lengua: cambios sociales - Various

Develops advanced language skills through the investigation of major currents of change in modern Spanish-speaking societies; gender issues, technology, revolution and counterrevolution. 

SPAN 307: Oral Skills - Leon-Howarth

In this course, students who have completed at least two years of Spanish work on building vocabulary, practicing verbal forms in conversational context, perfecting grammatical structures and pronunciation, and developing complex ideas in discussion, debate, and presentation formats. Prerequisite: two years of Spanish (or placement into third-year Spanish). 2.0 credits. 

SPAN 308: Comunidades Bilingues - Various 

Develops advanced language skills through the analysis of social and linguistic dynamics of communities in Spain, Latin America, and the United States where Spanish encounters another language. Taught in Spanish. Sequence with SPAN 301, 303, 305. 

SPAN 311: Advanced Writing in Spanish - Zunterstein

This requirement for the Spanish major provides additional language development for students early on in the major, emphasizing academic writing skills in Spanish.Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308.

SPAN 312: Spanish in the Media - Costales

Designed for heritage learners. Examines the role of Spanish in various forms of media such as television, Internet, and literature. Students practice advanced writing skills necessary to participate in argumentative writing and close textual readings. Prereq: any two from SPAN 301, 303, 305 or 308; SPAN 308 is recommended.  

SPAN 320: Intensive Spanish Grammar Review - Zunterstein

Review and development of the more complex aspects of Spanish grammar with special attention to idiomatic usage.

SPAN 322: Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics – Loza

Los lingüistas son científicos sociales que buscan responder a preguntas relacionadas con nuestro conocimiento y uso del lenguaje. Por ejemplo, ¿cuáles son las principales características del lenguaje humano? ¿Cómo se estructura y organiza? ¿Qué significa saber una lengua y usarla hábilmente? Enfocándonos en el español, este curso ofrece una introducción a los principales conceptos lingüísticos, especialmente aquellos relacionados con el estudio de los sonidos (fonética y fonología), las palabras (morfología), las frases y oraciones (sintaxis) y la variación (temporal, regional, social y contextual). También incluye ejercicios para desarrollar la conciencia lingüística de los estudiantes; aprenderán conceptos lingüísticos clave y realizarán análisis de diferentes aspectos de las estructuras lingüísticas y su uso por hablantes de español. (The course content focuses on the analysis of the basic linguistic characteristics of the Spanish language. It introduces students to the study of the Spanish sound system (phonetics and phonology), formation of words (morphology), sentence structure (syntax), as well as the evolution of the different Spanish varieties (historic, regional, and social). This class will prepare students for higher-level courses in Hispanic linguistics and others in which Spanish is used in formal academic contexts.)

SPAN 342: Hispanic Cultures through Literature II- Jesús Sepúlveda 

El objetivo de este curso es entregar una visión panorámica de la literatura precolombina, hispanoamericana y peninsular desde el siglo XV al siglo XVIII. Para ello el estudiante leerá textos precolombinos, indianos, renacentistas, pastoriles, barrocos e ilustrados, explorando una variedad de géneros y estilos. Las lecturas de este curso incluyen poemas, epístolas, fragmentos de novelas cortas, piezas dramáticas y comedias que dan cuenta del proceso transatlántico de formación histórica de la hispanidad en tanto fenómeno cultural, social, político y estético. Nuestro estudio comenzará con el mito maya de la creación y la cruzada colonizadora para luego abarcar el Siglo de Oro español, el barroco peninsular y latinoamericano, y concluir con una visión panorámica de la Ilustración. El estudiante verá además filmes y documentales que le permitirán apreciar la literatura de estos siglos en su contexto. Se espera que cada estudiante sea capaz de explicar su punto de vista de manera crítica, articulando por escrito sus ideas a la luz de los textos leídos. Por lo mismo, se espera que el estudiante sea capaz de leer e interpretar textos en castellano, situándolos en sus contextos históricos, geográficos y culturales.  

SPAN 344: Hispanic Cultures through Literature IV- 

Introduces students to a variety of texts written in the Hispanic world in their literary, artistic, and historical contexts, from the 20th century into the 21st. Sequence with SPAN 341, 342, 343. Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308. Approved to satisfy Category I-Arts and Letters general-education group requirement. Approved to satisfy Category B: international cultures multicultural requirement.

SPAN 348: United States Latino Literature and Culture- Pedro García-Caro 

En este curso estudiaremos las formas literarias en las que los latinos y latinas negocian la identidad cultural, la pervivencia del idioma y las costumbres de las gentes de origen hispano en los Estados Unidos. Los cambios sociales, el neocolonialismo, la inmigración, la violencia y la discriminación, la igualdad sexual, la homosexualidad, y el machismo, son algunos de los temas en los que se concentran los escritores y escritoras que estudiaremos. A través de ensayos, poemas, cuentos, novelas, películas y varias obras de teatro exploraremos los complejos procesos de afirmación cultural.

SPAN 355: Escritura Creativa- Jesús Sepúlveda

Este curso busca potenciar las capacidades creativas de los estudiantes de español a través de variados ejercicios de escritura. Durante el trimestre los estudiantes desarrollarán su sensibilidad poética y literaria, así como también su juicio crítico e interpretativo mediante sesiones de taller y discusión grupal. Se espera que cada estudiante escriba sus propios poemas y cuentos según sea su interés, siguiendo los lineamientos formales entregados por el profesor. El estudiante realizará cinco ejercicios de escritura dirigida y leerá obras literarias que sean pertinentes a sus proyectos individuales. Al término del curso cada estudiante deberá entregar un conjunto de escritos poéticos y/o narrativos originales que den cuenta de su trabajo creativo durante el trimester. Durante la última semana de clases se realizará una lectura pública dirigida a la comunidad universitaria e hispanohablante del estado de Oregón.  

SPAN 407: Culturas chamánicas- Jesús Sepúlveda

El objetivo de este seminario es explorar las culturas chamánicas de raigambre indoamericana, ibérica y africana en América Latina. Abordaremos conceptos tales como hechicería, brujería, nguillatún, alquimia, santería, psicomagia, nagualismo y realismo mágico, así como también examinaremos el significado de algunos ritos ceremoniales llevados a cabo con “plantas de poder”. A fin de entender y explorar nuestro tema de estudio, leeremos novelas, cuentos, poemas, ensayos y testimonios, examinando la conexión existente entre literatura y cognición a la luz de las muchas percepciones multidimensionales de la realidad presentes en las cosmologías chamánicas y en las prácticas contraculturales. En nuestro curso escucharemos música, veremos películas y documentales y leeremos textos de antropología y etnobotánica a fin de entender el contexto de nuestro estudio. También tendremos a conferencistas invitados. 

SPAN 420/520: Spanish Linguistics: Applied Linguistics - Sergio Loza

Este curso le ofrece al alumno una introducción a la lingüística aplicada. Se leerán capítulos y artículos transcendentes en el campo para que los alumnos adquieran un conocimiento acabado de los temas más importantes relacionados con la aplicación de la lingüística en contextos del "mundo" real. Aunque habrá un enfoque en la aplicación de la lingüística en el salón de clase y en cómo de enseña el español, también se discutirá el rol de la lingüística en el campo médico. Después de leer los varios capítulos asignados, los alumnos de este curso serán expuestos a las diversas metodologías y preguntas que actualmente forman y guían el campo de la lingüística aplicada. 

SPAN 480/580: Poesía urbana en España y América Latina - Cecilia Enjuto Rangel 

What is urban poetry? Poems about the modern city? Poems written in cities or marked by the urban experience, and whose language is transformed by the vital rhythm of the city? In this course we will discuss these questions, among others, and how modern Spanish and Latin American poetry of the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries describe, interprets and criticizes the modern city. We will also analyze the dialogue between text and its context, and how modern progress and the changes caused by the growth of cities aesthetically revolutionize poetry. We will study in detail key texts on literary theory and criticism, which we will connect with the close reading of the poems assigned. Some of the many poets we will discuss are Rosalía de Castro, Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer, José Martí, Rubén Darío, Juan Ramón Jiménez, Julia de Burgos, Federico García Lorca, Pablo Neruda, Luis Cernuda, Octavio Paz, Rosario Castellanos, Nancy Morejón, Luis García Montero, Ana Rossetti, José Emilio Pacheco, Urayoán Noel and Raquel Salas Rivera, among others. MA Periods 3 and 4. 

SPAN 690: Postcolonial Spain: The Cultures of Imperial Amnesia - Pedro García Caro 

The purpose of this seminar is to engage in an understanding of Iberian and Latin American cultural history over the last two centuries that transcends national and linguistic boundaries and focuses instead on the continuities and fractures between Latin America and the Iberian Peninsula. The course emerges from and performs an ongoing public academic debate and an emerging disciplinary practice: Transatlantic Studies. Its innovative research and discussions reframe the intertwined cultural histories of these diverse transnational spaces. By considering significant efforts by Spanish intellectuals to critique or resituate but also to reconsider and recreate Spain’s imperial pasts we will be able to engage in a reassessment of the role of empire and colonialism in characterizations of Spanish identity and culture. Here, the notion of post-colonial or imperial amnesia will be deployed as a paradigm to assess the ideological positionality of artists and creators in relation to the lengthy and controversial Spanish colonial legacy. Too often the emphasis on the struggle between Spanish traditionalism and modernization (or its bywords, such as Europeanization) has displaced the debate about Spanish identity away from Spain’s colonial involvement and its aftermath. This seminar seeks to allow undergraduate students in Hispanic studies to challenge earlier narratives of the literary canon and invite them to look for traces of the colonial experience in the contemporary cultural archive (1810-2022). MA Periods 3 and 4. 


Romance Languages

RL 407/507: The Idea of Europe - 4 credits - Fabienne Moore  

The Idea of Europe is a multi-disciplinary course that explores the meaning(s) of Europe past and present, and the conundrum that is European identity. Guest faculty from a variety of disciplines on campus (humanities, social sciences and the arts) lecture weekly on the European legacy as we explore cultural, historical, political and social institutions that continue to inform our ideas of Europe today. While the overall framework is historical, the course is a creative investigation into different perspectives, texts, issues, and disciplinary assumptions--often incompatible or competing--that shape “Europe” as an object of study. Each lecture and selected readings open an aspect of Europe from antiquity to the present. While the course is taught in English, it may bear credit for all degree programs in Romance Languages. Individual exploration of original materials in the European languages is encouraged. Students will be required to keep a reaction journal and to complete a term paper or project on some aspect of Europe. Faculty from various disciplines and areas of expertise will offer lectures and selected readings to explore certain aspects of Europe over time. Students are not expected to demonstrate mastery of the different topics presented in these lectures and readings and may reflect on the material from different disciplinary perspectives. But the lectures and readings are designed to challenge students beyond their comfort zone of familiarity and knowledge, opening them up to a variety of perspectives or “ideas” of Europe.  

For students in the master’s program: you are invited to work on the historical period of your choice for your research paper and connect your research topic with your MA exams and/or MA essay. 

RL 620: Preparing a Humanities Article for Publication - Lanie Millar 

In this course, we will learn the steps for preparing an article in the humanities for publication in a professional journal. Topic will include evaluation of mechanics, argument, organization, and secondary literature; getting to know journals in your field and evaluating possible outlets; and soliciting and incorporating peer feedback. Students should arrive with a solid draft of a paper they wish to revise. This course is open to students at any phase of graduate study but is particularly designed for doctoral students preparing a piece for publication in a US-based journal and MA students working on an MA essay.