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November 28, 2017

Alumnae in French Share TAPIF Advice and Professional Journeys

On November 27, Professors Alexandre Albert-Galtier and Fabienne Moore welcomed back alumnae Zoe Anton and Lauriene Madrigal for an information session on TAPIF, the Teaching Assistantship Program in France.

This was also an opportunity to hear about how French has played an important role in their professional journeys since graduating from UO. As Zoe put it “Your French will help in ways you do not know yet! You might not go into teaching or translating, you might end up in a different field, but your language skills will serve you no matter what you consider.” Both Zoe and Lauriene confirmed how a TAPIF experience, is “a great asset on a CV, makes employers look twice at a job application, and is a great conversation starter.” Classroom management, public speaking, adaptability, and autonomy are some of the skills that transfer well on the job market.

Zoe Anton graduated from UO in 2006 with a BA in International Studies and a BA in French with a minor in Communications. She participated in TAPIF in 2006/07 where she lived in Nantes and was a teaching assistant at Lycée Camille Claudel in Blain, France. Zoe then completed a MSc in Environmental Policy and Regulation from the prestigious London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). Throughout her career she has worked in sustainable development master planning for firms in England, Gabon (where she lived for two years), and Luxembourg with clients across the globe. Zoe has recently returned to the United States where she works for The Urban Collaborative, a master planning and design firm, helping governments plan for long-term sustainable growth.

Lauriene Madrigal was in the French immersion program in Eugene as a child and graduated with a B.A. in Art History & Visual Culture Studies, and a French Language & Literature minor from Whitman College in 2014. She had not studied abroad during her college years, so she participated in TAPIF this past year, (2016-17) where she was an assistant at a collège and lycée in Sablé sur Sarthe, but chose to live in Angers in the Loire Valley.  She is currently a commercial sales manager with Bridgestone Americas, managing dealerships’ sales representatives and their fleet relationships for commercial truck tires.

For the perspective of a UO alumna in the TAPIF program now, check Amanda’s current blog from Cognac: https://aaswan.wordpress.com/

For information on TAPIF, see
http://frenchhighereducation.org/teaching-assistant-program

 

 

November 21, 2017

CLLAS Teach-in on Puerto Rico

CLLAS invites you to a Teach-In with professors Cecilia Enjuto-Rangel (Romance Languages), Rocío Zambrana (Philosophy), and Alaí Reyes-Santos (Ethnic Studies) to engage in conversation about Puerto Rico and its place in the contemporary colonial history of the United States.

Sponsored by the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies.

November 21, 2017
12:00 pm to 1:30 pm

Condon Hall Rm 260
1321 Kincaid St.
UO campus

November 1, 2017

MA student writes about his experience attending the Middlebury College’s Portuguese language school

By Austin Vander Wel

For seven weeks this summer I had the privilege of attending Middlebury College’s Portuguese language school as they celebrated their 15th anniversary. This rigorous program prides itself in assuring language acquisition through complete immersion and intense exposure to the target language.

Along with five hours daily of specialized classes on grammar, pronunciation, and Lusophone culture, Middlebury’s Portuguese language school offers numerous extra-curricular activities to teach language in a relaxed environment. I decided to take advantage of this informal setting to further develop my Portuguese skills and maximize my time in the language. I read poetry, played volleyball, watched movies, and presented on the school’s weekly radio show exclusively in Portuguese, which greatly boosted my confidence in oral and written communication while building a community with other students. In our culture modules, I dove into the economic and political issues most pertinent to Brazil today, researched the rich afro-brazilian culture that continues to shape all aspects of Brazil, and found out how the myth of Orpheus and other stories live on in the symbolism of today’s Carnival celebrations.

At Middlebury, I had the opportunity to write a poem with the Portuguese writer Rui Zink and learn about the indigenous heritage of Brazil from the author Daniel Munduruku. I found that the other instructors were also extremely capable and welcoming; accepting my linguistic blunders as a necessary part of the learning process. Before long, our group saw considerable advances in our language abilities as we carried out our daily lives entirely in Portuguese.

At the heart of Middlebury’s intensive summer programs is their secret ingredient: the language pledge. While this pledge may deter fair-weather language learners, it was exactly what convinced me to apply to the program. Yes, I signed away the right to communicate in any language besides Portuguese for seven weeks, but this discipline was necessary to overcome my excessive use of “Portuñol,” or Portuguese mixed with Spanish, which had become a habit before attending Middlebury. With time and practice, I found myself resisting and eventually erasing these false cognates from my mind when speaking Portuguese. Although I still have more to learn about the language, I experienced immense linguistic growth in only seven weeks. For those interested, I highly recommend investigating Middlebury College’s language schools to see if this complete linguistic immersion interests you. Muito obrigado e boa sorte!

Click here to learn more about the Portuguese program at the UO. For more information, contact Bene Santos, supervisor of the Portuguese program, at benballe@uoregon.edu, or call (541) 346-4046.  Visit the Portuguese Courses page to see what PORT classes are currently being offered.

 

 

October 25, 2017

Students share their experiences studying Portuguese in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

By Shayla T Hayes

For the terms of Winter and Spring of 2017, I decided to start a journey to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil to study abroad through a program called CIEE. For these six and a half months I was able to immerse myself in the Brazilian culture and gain an experience I will never forget. I left in the beginning of January and flew in alongside a group of students that were both American and of other nationalities. I was placed into a host family who lives along the beach of Botafogo in Rio. This family consisted of a host mom, dad, and sister who was 9 years old. They also had a cat, Calvin, who became attached to me at the hip by the time I left. They all welcomed me with open arms, and I got to know them very well. None of them spoke English, so it forced me to practice my Portuguese right off the bat.

For the first month that I was in Brazil, I attended PUC-Rio. During this month, I took an intensive Portuguese. It was a lot to take in at once. On the bright side, I was able to meet a bunch of new students during this time, and I got to know my fellow international peers well. I then started school at ESPM in the central part of Rio. It was downtown and a business and design school. Here I studied photography and 3D animation for the next five months. I made some amazing Brazilian friends at ESPM. They guided me when I was lost, taught me things about Brazilian culture, and laughed with me just like any of my friends in the US would continue my Portuguese course studies, I had a private teacher through CIEE named Marco.

Outside of class, I experienced so many unforgettable things throughout the country. In February I was privileged enough to experience Carnival. It was indescribable, and the passion and liveliness were amazing. When I go back to Brazil, I hope to go during Carnival. I also traveled a lot. São Paulo, Vítoria, Salvador, Iguaçu, Ilha Grande and Argentina are just a few places to name. I had endless pictures from all of these journeys.

In Vítoria I was able to see my Brazilian brother, Vitor. I visited him at least four times during the six months. My mother also visited in May, and I was able to show her everything I was accomplishing and doing while exploring the wonderful country I lived in. Other things I did in my spare time was a hike, do internships with design, teach an English class to second graders, relax on the beach with a caipirinha in hand, and spend time with friends. I spent so much time on the beach and hiking it was insane. Other activities like soccer games, samba classes, and concerts were also on the list! Overall, I loved my time abroad. It was life-changing. Brazil has truly become a second home in my heart.

 

 

 

By Adrien Detchmendy

During Summer 2017, I traveled to Rio de Janeiro to participate in an intensive Portuguese language program. I had taken Portuguese classes at the U of O since my freshman year. Ever since I was young, Brazilian culture and the Portuguese language fascinated me, but I never was given the chance to take a Portuguese language class. When I entered into freshman year I signed up for Portuguese 101 taught by Bene Santos. Immediately I began to pick up the language with ease. I think a major factor into that was the professors teaching style. We drilled concepts but stuck to one a week, which gave me a strong base and understanding of the language. After I had finished the first year of Portuguese, my Portuguese professor suggested I look into studying abroad somewhere in Brazil. In fact, the professor strongly suggested it to all of the students in the class and implored people to travel to Brazil and experience the culture.

Going into my second year of Portuguese, I noticed the style of the class changed from the first year. Instead of focusing on vocabulary the focus was more on being capable to hold a conversation with a native speaker or someone who is learning as well. It was around this time I identified a summer program in Rio that looked good. As I began the process of applying, my professor couldn’t have been more helpful with it. She was more than happy to write me a recommendation to go and implored me to ask any questions or concerns I may have. Through the end of my second year in Portuguese, the class became increasingly focused on reading comprehension and conversation practice. One of our final projects was a 5-minute dialogue with another student about our summer plans. By doing all of the conversation practice and comprehension I felt I brought a strong understanding of the language with me to Brazil.

The program I was chose was an intensive Portuguese language course at PUC, a private Catholic university in Rio de Janeiro. From start to finish, the program lasted a little under 5 weeks. I was going to be staying with a host family in Copacabana. Going there, I really wasn’t sure what to expect. However, shortly I arrived I realized I had chosen the right place to come. The people in Brazil were warm, nice and very patient with me. They encouraged me to speak Portuguese anywhere I went and often they liked helping me practice so I could better learn and speak their language. Within the first week of being there I could feel my confidence increasing and by the end of my program, I was navigating the city and surrounding areas with ease. I think this transition, which can be so hard for others, was so easy for me because of all the conversation practice I had done in my Portuguese classes at the U of O.

 

October 17, 2017

Amanda Powell recently published a chapter in the new research guide Routledge Research Companion to the Works of Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz 

Amanda Powell (Senior Lecturer II, Spanish) recently published a chapter called “Passionate Advocate: Sor Juana, Feminisms, and Sapphic Loves,” in the new research guide, Routledge Research Companion to the Works of Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (ed. by Emilie L. Bergmann and Stacey Schlau; 2017).
Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (1648–1695) continually stirs both popular and scholarly imaginations. World-famous in her own time, in the modern period her writing has received consistent scholarly attention only since the 1970s. Her poetry, plays, and essays stand out in the political, religious, and intellectual context of colonial New Spain — what we know as Mexico. This volume examines areas of scholarship that illuminate her work, including her status as an iconic figure in Latin American and Baroque literature, present-day popular culture in Mexico and the United States, and feminism across time.
Amanda Powell’s chapter in this research guide examines how and why scholars regard her thinking as feminist, and what approaches past and present scholarship takes toward her passionate love poems addressed to women. The title of the chapter is: “Passionate Advocate: Sor Juana, Feminisms, and Sapphic Loves.”
October 3, 2017

Kevin Regan-Maglione wins CAS fellowship to research collection of Reinaldo Arenas Papers at Princeton University Library

Kevin Regan-Maglione, a 4th-year doctoral candidate in Italian and Spanish in the Department of Romance Languages, received the Charles A. Reed Fellowship from UO College of Arts and Sciences to do archival research for his dissertation, which focuses on queer subjectivities and prison testimonies.

This fellowship will fund his research during the Spring 2018 term at the Princeton University Library, where its Manuscript Division holds the Reinaldo Arenas Papers, a collection that consists of typescripts and manuscripts of novels and novellas, short stories, plays and screenplays, poetry, nonfiction, correspondence, and miscellaneous material, produced by the Cuban author.

Kevin is also interested in the author’s 135 letters to Jorge and Margarita Camacho, also held there. Kevin expects these materials will provide invaluable insight into Arenas’ conceptualization of his autobiographical testimonial writing. The second chapter of Kevin’s dissertation deconstructs the testimonial drive and show how queerness operates within and against normative testimonial prison writing.

September 25, 2017

RL Graduate receives the American Translators Association Student Translation Award

Delaney Swink, who completed her B.A. with departmental honors in Romance Languages in June 2017, has received the American Translators Association Student Translation Award to support her Spanish-to-English translations of feminist Chilean poet Rosa Alcayaga’s book Maldito Paraíso [Damned Paradise]. Assessing the project, the ATA judges admired Delaney’s “topic, translation style, and the potential for publication.” Besides the award itself, she receives a stipend toward attending its presentation at the ATA Annual Conference in Washington, D.C., in October 2017.

Delaney’s project is also supported by the Global Oregon Translation Studies Working Group Undergraduate Translation Award. Together, these will help her travel to Chile for three weeks in January 2018, where she will meet and work directly with Ms. Alcayaga on the project-in-progress. Rosa Alcayaga’s work combines literary and colloquial Spanish, and its cultural allusions range from Biblical-era patriarchs and resistant women heroes to Latin American history and current social-political issues including gender violence. Delaney’s translations render these complex meanings and key contexts in lively English. The project began in Amanda Powell’s translation seminar (RL 407/507) in winter 2017.

¡Felicidades y buena suerte, Delaney!

 

Delaney Swink, Class of 2017

 

September 19, 2017

Erin Gallo (Ph.D. Candidate 2018) Publishes in Hispanic Review

Ph.D. candidate Erin Gallo has just published an article in the prestigious Hispanic Review.

Abstract: In September 1966, during the incipient stages of the US Women’s Liberation Movement, Rosario Castellanos (1925–1974) began a yearlong stay in the United States as a visiting professor of Spanish at three state institutions. This article studies the lasting impressions of US liberationist discourses on Castellanos, who was simultaneously negotiating separation from her then-husband Ricardo Guerra. Through a close reading of the letters she wrote to Guerra and through interviews with two of her former students, this article contends that it was during this decisive year abroad that Castellanos began to reconcile the dissonance between her public feminist persona and its private enactment in her family life.

For more info about the article, you can contact Erin Gallo directly at egallo@uoregon.edu

August 28, 2017

Jesús Sepúlveda Celebrates the 27th International Festival of Poetry in Medellín, Colombia

Eleven days after the FARC (the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia) laid down their arms, the International Festival of Poetry in Medellín began its 27th version, celebrating world peace and reconciliation in Colombia.

If Medellín was associated with Pablo Escobar and the drug cartels in the early 1990’s, today it has become the capital of poetry.

From July 8th to 15th, 2017, an international community of poets met in Medellín to celebrate poetry and peace through the slogan “construyendo el país soñado” and explore possible articulations to link poetry to the peace-making process.

Chilean poet and RL instructor Jesús Sepúlveda was invited to participate with more than 100 other selected international and Colombian poets to read poetry in public.  Readings were also held in Bogotá and in other locations in the country, including the so-called “normalization zones” near temporary guerrilla camps where former fighters transition into civil life.

Each day poets shared their poetry in public spaces—local libraries in underprivileged neighborhoods, countercultural theaters, universities, public plazas, and many cultural buildings.

This year was symbolic because of the recent peace agreement, but also particularly difficult because of political conflicts, which led some important institutions to withdraw their support from the festival.  As the founder and director of the festival poet Fernando Rendón put it, the cultural functionaries feel they own the public budget, therefore:

“Aunque la guerra haya terminado, se mantiene la escala de tropas y armamentos, y el mal gusto por la áspera dominación y la cultura de la fuerza; se menoscaba aún más el presupuesto de la cultura; se interceptan los fondos de las agencias de cooperación que engrosan los presupuestos ministeriales; se imponen nuevos tributos y requisitos a las actividades culturales; se privatizan espacios tradicionales para el arte; se restringe al máximo el uso del espacio “público”; se hace inaccesible el costo de los libros y otros productos culturales; se incumplen compromisos con sectores  avanzados del teatro nacional; se imponen a los actores culturales las mismas normas contables que a las empresas trasnacionales; se retienen aportes vitales para desarrollar procesos en los tiempos puntuales; se maltrata a los creadores y gestores.”

 

In spite of these difficulties, the festival was able to assemble poets, musicians and the public in an exceptional and peaceful symbiosis that makes this festival one of the most important poetry events around the world.

Poets also led literary workshops on current issues.  Jesús Sepúlveda delivered a talk on poetry and utopia called “Jardines para la paz” at the Corporación Ecológica y Cultural Penca de Sábila.  At the end of this workshop, participants wrote their own creative pieces.  The following day a reading was organized at the Palacio de Bellas Artes where poets Samuel Bossini and Graciela Maturo from Argentina and Jesús Sepúlveda read together with some participants from different workshops that took place during the week in the context of the “Escuela de Poesía del Festival” directed by poet Jairo Guzmán.

The closing ceremony of the festival was a collective reading where many poets, including Sepúlveda, read their work in front of a multitude that gathered at the Parque de los Deseos.  The crowd’s enthusiastic cheers and applause were an uplifting confirmation of the powers of poetry to embrace peace and unity in a country submerged in armed conflict for the last 53 years.

Jesús Sepúlveda adds: “I can only express my gratitude for the warm welcome and dedication of Fernando and Luis Eduardo Rendón, Gloria y Natalia, and all organizers for the smooth organization led by a team of presenters, interpreters, and translators, and for the energizing spirit of Colombia.  Language transformed into poetry and poetry transformed into peace are the keys of this festival whose creative resonance is a crucial experience for poets in all languages.  ¡Viva el Festival Internacional de Poesía de Medellín!”

[For more information about the “Festival Internacional de Poesía de Medellín,” click here: https://www.festivaldepoesiademedellin.org/es/Intro/index.htm]

 

June 8, 2017

RL student to join Peace Corps in Peru

Briauna Jones (B.A. Spanish and Comparative Literature, with Latin American Studies minor, 2017) will travel to Peru after graduation in June to work in the youth development sector of the Peace Corps. After three months of training in Lima, her job will focus on healthy lifestyles and vocational skills for youth aged 14 to 22.

“I look forward to using my Spanish in a meaningful way in order to communicate with youth about well-rounded diets, safe sex practices, and exercise plans, as well as interviewing skills and resume building,” says Jones, a native of Sunriver, Oregon. Her assignment runs from August 2017 to December 2019.

Congratulations, Briauna!

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