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March 14, 2018

Cristina Moreiras-Menor’s Open Lecture at the UO

The RLGSA (RL Graduate Student Association) is hosting Cristina Moreiras-Menor this week. On March 14th, she will offer a lecture on the film “Biutiful” entitled “Death, Afterlife and the Question of Existence” in 115 Lawrence Hall at 3:30pm.

On Thursday, March 15: Workshop with students and faculty from 10:00 to 11:30 at EMU 230.

Later that Thursday: Mini talk with RL faculty and graduate students from 1 to 1:50 at 306 Deady.

Moreiras-Menor the author of Cultura herida: literatura y cine en la España democrática (Ediciones Libertarias, 2002) and La estela del tiempo: Imagen e historicidad en el cine español contemporáneo (Iberoamericna/Vervuert, 2011). She has also published extensively on authors and filmmakers such as Teresa de Jesús, Rosalía de Castro, Leopoldo ‘Alas’ Clarín, Miguel de Unamuno, Juan Goytisolo, Xosé Luis Méndez Ferrín, Ana Rossetti, Manuel Vazquez Montalbán, Luis Buñuel, Álex de la Iglesia, Mario Camus (among many others), as well on topics such as violence and memory, violence and the state, critical regionalism, the Spanish Civil War, the Francoist Dictatorship, and the Transition to Democracy.



March 10, 2018

Leah Middlebrook in Tanner Lecture Series

On March 19, Leah Middlebrook will deliver a public lecture at Utah State University, as part of the Tanner Lecture Series. The talk, taken from her book-in-progress, is titled “The View from Thebes: Framing Poetry for the 21st Century.”


March 6, 2018

CLLAS Symposium

Justice Across Borders: Gender, Race, and Migration in the Americas

March 8, 2018
Knight Library, Browsing Room, 1501 Kincaid St.
Gerlinger Lounge, 1468 University St.
Free & open to the public

Our thematic line of inquiry this year: America, Bridge Between Oceans poses the following questions: What happens when we put the Atlantic world in conversation with the Pacific? What kind of art and cultural production emerges? Which stories of struggles for racial, economic, gender and environmental justice arise? How does looking at Latinx and Latin American Studies from within the Pacific Rim region open up innovative and necessary methodological and analytical horizons? These questions also inspire our symposium Justice Across Borders: Gender, Race, and Migration in the Americas.

Fostering conversations about race, ethnicity, diasporas, gender, sexuality, migration, environmental justice, and culture that bridge the Atlantic and Pacific world, the symposium Justice Across Borders: Gender, Race, and Migration in the Americas explores what kind of new knowledges, art, social transformations, and activism we can create together in the face of increasing inequalities and social violence across the continent. We meditate on what contributions emerge from Pacific Rim-based research, art, advocacy work, and political movements when we put ourselves in conversation with scholars, artists, and activists based in the Atlantic coast.  We will discuss the increasing visibility of Caribbean migrants in the Pacific Northwest, environmental justice issues in Mexico, the U.S., Puerto Rico and the Southern Cone, archipelagic studies that encompass Caribbean and Pacific islands, gender politics within Latin American and Latinx communities in Oregon, experiences of Latin Americans alongside Pacific Islanders in the Pacific Rim region, queer Latina and AfroLatin@ art, indigeneity, blackness and Jewish diasporas in Latin America, challenges faced by a variety of Latinx communities in the U.S., etc. From a Latinx and Latin American Studies perspective, we engage comparative and relational dialogues with fields such as Pacific Islander Studies, Asian and Asian American Studies, Black Studies, Native American Studies, among others, hoping to bring new light into the epistemic possibilities of our fields and the meaning of Justice for all of us.

Symposium organizer: Alaí Reyes-Santos

Full list of affiliations

9:00 – 9:15 AM (Browsing Room)
Welcome from UO administration officials, CLLAS director, symposium coordinator.

9:20-10:30 AM (Browsing Room)
Race, Ethnicity and Diasporas
Rocio ZambranaLanie Millar, Roberto Arroyo
Chair: Marta Maldonado

10:40-11:50 AM (Browsing Room)
Women and Gender in Latin America and U.S. Latinx communities
Vicky Falcon, Michelle McKinleyKristin YarrisLynn StephenGabriela Martinez
Chair: Vicky Falcon,  Instituto de Cultura Oregoniana

12:00- 1:00 PM (Gerlinger Alumni Lounge)
Keynote Speaker/Lunch

“New Directions in Latinx and Latin American Studies: Archipelagos Across the Caribbean and the Pacific”
Guest: Yolanda Martinez-San Miguel
Chair: Rocio Zambrana and Lanie Millar

2:00-3:00 PM (Browsing Room)
Environmental Justice in the Americas
Judith Vega; David VazquezSarah WaldAnalisa TaylorPedro Garcia-Caro
Chair: David Vazquez

3:10 – 4:30 PM Roundtable (Browsing Room)
“Art, Migration, and Political Activism: Caribbean and Pacific Islander Migrants in the Pacific”
[SPONSORS: Department of Ethnic Studies, the Wayne Morse Center for Law & Politics, and the Center for Asia and Pacific Studies (CAPS)]
Panelists:  Judith Sierra-Rivera; JoAnna Poblete; Philipp Carrasco, Oregon AFL-CIO; Ileana Rodriguez Silva; Joyce Pualani Warren; and Jannes Martinez, Iyalocha, Lukumi priestess
Chair: Alaí Reyes-Santos

4:40PM – 5:40 PM  Plenary Session (Browsing Room)
“Latinx Communities: Questions, Challenges, and Transformations”
Monica Rojas, Director, Movimiento AfroLatino de Seattle; Laura Pulido; Ramona Hernández; Edwin Melendez, Director, Center for Puerto Rican Studies
Chair: Gerardo Sandoval

6:00 PM – 7:30 PM (Gerlinger Alumni Lounge)
RiffiandoDominican Artists in the House! A Talk/Reading/Performance
Josefina BaezAna-Maurine Lara, and Ernesto Lara
Coordinator: Ana-Maurine Lara

Light Dinner/Reception

Sponsored by the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS); Wayne Morse Center for Law & Politics; UO College of Arts and Sciences; The Office of the Provost; Center for the Study of Women in Society (CSWS); Latin American Studies program; Department of English; Department of Romance Languages; Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; Department of Anthropology; School of Journalism and Communication; Department of Philosophy; the Center for Asia and Pacific Studies (CAPS); the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA); Department of Ethnic Studies; Global Studies Institute, and the Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides (NCAP).

November 21, 2017

Chile in Conversation: Lectura de Poesía – Poetry Reading

Jesús Sepúlveda reads from his most recent poetry book Espejo de detalles. November 21, 4:30-6:00 – Mills International Lounge (EMU). 

Latin American Studies Book Presentation Series: Chile in Conversation.

October 30, 2017

“Queering Internal Exile on Italian Screen” a Public Lecture by Prof. Dana Renga

On Thursday Nov. 16th Prof. Renga (Chair of Italian and French at Ohio State University) will give a lecture on the forced exile of several homosexual inmates during fascism as represented and memorialized in a number of Italian documentaries and fiction films.

Gerlinger Lounge
Nov. 16th (5pm)

In 2003, multi-term ex-prime minister of Italy Silvio Berlusconi stated: ‘I understand the difficulties of teaching democracy to a people who for nearly forty years have known only dictatorship.’ Interviewer Nicholas Farrell prompted: ‘Like Italy at the fall of Fascism.’ To this, Berlusconi infamously declared ‘That was a much more benign dictatorship; Mussolini did not murder anyone. Mussolini sent people on holidays to confine them to banishment to small islands such as Ponza or Maddalena which are now exclusive resorts.’ The promotion of internal exile (‘confino’) as holiday is particularly interesting when considering the experience of men sent to the islands for suspicion of ‘pederasty’ (as it was referred to at the time). As this talk discusses, gay men found a certain amount of freedom on an island prison where conditions were grim, barracks were overcrowded, illness was rampant, jobs were unavailable, and the average stipend was only four lire per day. At the same time, the experience of gay men sent into internal exile is cloaked in silence. The lecture interrogates this silence by looking at two feature films, three documentaries, and a graphic novel that treat, to different degrees, the experiences of gay men sent into internal exile.



October 25, 2017

2017 RL MA students rejoice post forum performance

On Friday, October 20, 2017, from 12 to 5:30 pm, the RL department got together for the annual MA Fall Forum. This year, we listened to rich and wonderfully varied presentations by eleven second-year MA students who presented their research in a formal conference setting of four sessions chaired by doctoral students, followed by Q&A.

Check below the enclosed program to read the tantalizing abstracts!

Director of Graduate Studies Fabienne Moore and Graduate Coordinator Lena Cottam organized the event, a highlight of the MA program.

Congratulations to Yasmin, Stacey, Linguesh, Kiana, Laurel, Rafa, Miki, Riccardo, Lara, Austin and Peter for stimulating intellectual exchanges that are the foundation of our RL community.

October 19, 2017

Toño Martorell, Puerto Rican Artist Visits UO

Conversation (Q/A) with Puerto Rican artist Antonio Martorell on OCT 19 from 12pm-1:30pm at Crater Lake North EMU 146.

Please, sign up for this conversation (Q/A) by sending Cecilia Enjuto Rangel an email at There is a limited space in this event and we want to know how many students, faculty members and members of the community are able to attend. Everyone is invited, please spread the word.

We also want to invite you attend his public lecture (free and open to everyone):

“Communication, Communion, and Confrontation in

Puerto Rican Art” by Antonio Martorell, Puerto Rican artist at


Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

Ford Lecture Hall


Sponsored by: Teaching Engagement Program:

Community Engagement Grant

Co-Sponsored by: Oregon Humanities Center, Latin

American Studies, Division of Equity and Inclusion,

Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, Romance Languages,

and Center for Latino/a & Latin American Studies.

Antonio Martorell is a visting artist at Linfield College. His exhibition,

“Rain/Lluvia” can be seen at the Linfield Art Gallery, opening October 16 and

continuing through November 18. It is his first exhibition in the Pacific NW.

September 25, 2017

Jesús Sepúlveda Travels to Cambodia to participate in Sylt Foundation’s program “Transformation and Identity, Trauma and Reconciliation”

For several years now the Sylt Foundation and its curator, Indra Wussow, have fostered a dialogue that breaks national borders between artists dealing with “Transformation and Identity, Trauma and Reconciliation” in their work, probing the legacies of Germany’s Fascism, South Africa’s Apartheid, Chile and Myanmar’s dictatorship, and Cambodia’s Khmer Rouge regime. Following a Sylt Foundation residency in South Africa in December 2017, Chilean poet and RL instructor Jesús Sepúlveda was invited to Cambodia from August 3-17, 2017 to meet with fellow poets and authors from Cambodia, Germany, and Myanmar, and numerous cultural agents invested in Cambodia’s past, present and future. Indra Wussow and co-curator Irene Leung organized a rich array of encounters: there was a dinner roundtable with choreographer and dancer Sophiline Cheam Shapiro who collaborated with oral historian Theresa den Langis and trauma psychologist Sylvia Johnson to create a ballet performance on forced marriages—one of the legacies of Pol Pot’s regime; there was a brunch and later an art opening with Java Arts’ gallery owner Dana Langlois focused on supporting emerging Cambodian visual artists and designers; a discussion with Cambodian curator Lyno Vuth and young artists in a newly created artist-run space, Sa Sa Art Projects. With German author Sasha Rey and Burmese poet Diu Ga Lay, Sepúlveda also participated in a translation workshop with aspiring Cambodian poets, exchanging poems and crafting translations into English and/or Khmer that culminated in a public, multilingual poetry reading at Meta House, the German Cambodian Cultural Center, sponsored by the Goethe Institute.

Translation workshop at Meta House on 8/8/2017

The group also attended the screening of Cambodia Son in a community theater. The 2014 documentary by Masashiro Sugano relates the odyssey of Kosal Khiev, now 37 years old, born in a refugee camp in Cambodia, exiled as a one-year old to California with his mother and siblings, falling into delinquency and jailed at 16 for the next 14 years; and deported to Cambodia, permanently banished from the USA. Kosal, who has become a spoken word artist, took questions from the audience, shared memories and hopes, performed his texts, and joined the Sylt Foundation fellows for dinner.

Spoken word artist Kosal Khiev with Indra Wussow, Jesús Sepúlveda, Diu Ga Lay and Chantha Lock on 9/8/2017

Another unforgettable encounter took place with Youk Chhang, founder and director of the Documentation Center of Cambodia (or DC-Cam). Himself a survivor, a refugee in the USA, and now a philanthropist and human rights advocate, he has a mission to document and educate about Khmer Rouges atrocities, bring justice to the victims, and heal with the curative powers of art and beauty. In addition to his archival research, Mr. Chhang commissioned late Lebanese celebrated architect Dame Zaha Hadid to design an exceptional building named the Sleuk Rith Institute that will serve as an archive, a museum, and a graduate research center for trauma studies in the heart of the Cambodian capital. The fellows toured the Documentation Center, observed the busy team of interns digitizing documents and testimonies, and the work of videographers, then visited the nearby Wat Langka temple to marvel at the funerary urns hidden from the Khmer Rouge and rediscovered by accident by Mr. Chhang. Across the boulevard, Cambodia’s main teacher’s college, the National Institute of Education, boasts an art gallery. As a parting gift to the group, Mr. Chhang gave everyone the Teacher’s Guidebook to the teaching of “a history of Democratic Kampuchea (1975-1979)” published by DC-Cam along with a textbook printed in the hundreds of thousands and distributed to all students in grade 9-12 (Kampuchea was the name of the Khmer Rouge state). “Genocide education is genocide prevention,” says the back cover.

Director of DC-Cam Youk Chhang with IndraWussow, Jesús Sepúlveda & Sasha Rey on 11/8/2017

Sepúlveda also delved into Cambodia’s contrasted history with an emotional visit to the Tuol Sleng Genocide Museum (a high school converted into a torture center by the Khmer Rouge), a tour of the Royal Palace, and excursions near the city of Siem Reap to the famed temples of Angkor Wat, Angkor Thom, Bantey Srei, and Preah Khan.

Grateful thanks go to the Sylt Foundation’s generosity and vision in making possible an essential cross-cultural, international dialogue among the arts on responding to trauma, on identity formation and transformation.

September 19, 2017

Sept 26-27: Chilean poet, Raúl ZURITA at UO

RAÚL ZURITA (1950) is one of Latin America’s most celebrated poets. His works include Purgatorio (1979), Anteparaíso (1982), Canto a su amor desaparecido (1985), La Vida Nueva (1994), INRI (2003) and Zurita (2011). Through his writings, Zurita chronicles the violent history of Chile’s military dictatorship as well as that of the Americas since the conquest. In 1979, along with other artists, he founded CADA, Colectivo de Acciones de Arte, an art action group dedicated to the creation of political art that would resist the military regime. In 1982, he composed a poem in the sky over New York, and in 1993 he bulldozed “ni pena ni miedo” (no pain no fear) into the coarse sands of the Desert of Atacama. Due to its dimensions, this line is only visible from the sky. Zurita was awarded the Chilean National Prize of Literature and a scholarship from the Guggenheim Foundation. He has been conferred two Doctor honoris causa degrees and is Professor emeritus at the Universidad Diego Portales.


Lunch Brown Bag Conversation in Spanish with the Poet

TUESDAY SEPT 26 at 12:00pm to 1:30am
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Lease Crutcher Lewis Room 023
1395 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403

WEDNESDAY SEPT 27 4pm-5:30pm
Browsing Room, Knight Library
(Q/A in Spanish and English)

The generous support of the College of Arts and Sciences Program Grant, the Oregon Humanities Center, the Translation Studies Working Group, Romance Languages, Comparative Literature, Latin American Studies, and the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS) makes this event possible. These events are free and open to the public.


Contact Prof. Cecilia Enjuto Rangel ( for a reservatiofor the Q/A session. We will meet at noon, so if you want to bring a brown bag lunch, you can.

August 20, 2017

UO professor suggests a Willamette River view of the eclipse in Portland

Story originally published in the Around the O.

Millions have their certified eclipse glasses ready for Monday’s solar event, but the UO’s Leah Middlebrook is recommending another eclipse essential for people in Portland: a flotation device.

Middlebrook, a professor of comparative literature and romance languages, is organizing a “splash mob” to watch Monday’s solar eclipse from the surface of the Willamette River. Interested participants can join the group with their favorite inner tube, standup paddleboard or lifejacket and catch the solar show while floating on the river.

The event will start at 8:30 a.m. Monday at the East Bank Esplanade, below Portland Fire and Rescue Station 21.

The Portland area is just outside the path of totality, but will get a 99.4 percent view of the eclipse.

The unconventional viewing party was inspired by the work of the Human Access Project, an organization that aims to transform Portland’s relationship with the Willamette River and to inspire people to cherish, preserve and enjoy the waterway.

Middlebrook is a member of the organization’s board of directors and regularly participates in group-swim outings through its River Huggers Swim Team, which hosts dips in the Willamette River every weekday. The group is open to all ages and all abilities. Their main goal to have fun and raise public awareness that the Willamette River is safe for swimming.

It was at one of these swims that someone first floated the idea for an eclipse water party.

“We were swimming together on this gorgeous sun-drenched morning when someone suggested a group float for the solar eclipse,” Middlebrook said. “As soon as it was out there, it was so obvious that it should happen because it will be such a fun way to simultaneously enjoy the river and the eclipse.”

Event organizers hope that people will see this event as an opportunity to catch the eclipse in an environmentally friendly way. They are encouraging folks to skip the heavy traffic and bike, walk or skateboard down to the river for a fully human-powered eclipse experience.

“We want to help people see the eclipse without burning gas,” Middlebrook said.

Middlebrook promises the river is currently at a comfortable temperature and is quick to confirm that it is both safe and amazing for swimming.

“Once you start using the Willamette River, you’ll keep going back,” she said. “The river is Portland’s largest public space and there are so many great beaches and docks to access it. I hope the eclipse helps some new folks realize what an amazing resource the Willamette River is.”

Middlebrook’s academic specialty is poetry, which she believes offers another great way to enhance the eclipse experience. She encourages eclipse enthusiasts to peruse some poetry before Monday to enrich their sun and moon gazing.

“Spend a little time looking for a poem about the sun or the moon and keep that in mind while you’re watching the eclipse,” she urged. “This phenomenon has created a lot of new excitement for us but poets have been reflecting on the sun and the moon for a very long time.”

A few of her personal favorites include William Shakespeare’s “Fear no more the heat o’ the sun,” Robert Louis Stevenson’s “The face of the moon,” Emily Dickinson’s “The Moon was but a chin of gold,” Henry David Thoreau’s “I am the Autumnal Sun,” Lucille Clifton’s “Raccoon Prayer” and Denis Johnson’s “The White Fires of Venus.”

—By Emily Halnon, University Communications

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