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September 19, 2017

Sept 26-27: Chilean poet, Raúl ZURITA at UO

RAÚL ZURITA (1950) is one of Latin America’s most celebrated poets. His works include Purgatorio (1979), Anteparaíso (1982), Canto a su amor desaparecido (1985), La Vida Nueva (1994), INRI (2003) and Zurita (2011). Through his writings, Zurita chronicles the violent history of Chile’s military dictatorship as well as that of the Americas since the conquest. In 1979, along with other artists, he founded CADA, Colectivo de Acciones de Arte, an art action group dedicated to the creation of political art that would resist the military regime. In 1982, he composed a poem in the sky over New York, and in 1993 he bulldozed “ni pena ni miedo” (no pain no fear) into the coarse sands of the Desert of Atacama. Due to its dimensions, this line is only visible from the sky. Zurita was awarded the Chilean National Prize of Literature and a scholarship from the Guggenheim Foundation. He has been conferred two Doctor honoris causa degrees and is Professor emeritus at the Universidad Diego Portales.

 

Lunch Brown Bag Conversation in Spanish with the Poet

TUESDAY SEPT 26 at 12:00pm to 1:30am
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Lease Crutcher Lewis Room 023
1395 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403

POETRY Reading (in SPANISH)
WEDNESDAY SEPT 27 4pm-5:30pm
Browsing Room, Knight Library
(Q/A in Spanish and English)

The generous support of the College of Arts and Sciences Program Grant, the Oregon Humanities Center, the Translation Studies Working Group, Romance Languages, Comparative Literature, Latin American Studies, and the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS) makes this event possible. These events are free and open to the public.

 

Contact Prof. Cecilia Enjuto Rangel (enjuto@uoregon.edu) for a reservatiofor the Q/A session. We will meet at noon, so if you want to bring a brown bag lunch, you can.

August 20, 2017

UO professor suggests a Willamette River view of the eclipse in Portland

Story originally published in the Around the O.

Millions have their certified eclipse glasses ready for Monday’s solar event, but the UO’s Leah Middlebrook is recommending another eclipse essential for people in Portland: a flotation device.

Middlebrook, a professor of comparative literature and romance languages, is organizing a “splash mob” to watch Monday’s solar eclipse from the surface of the Willamette River. Interested participants can join the group with their favorite inner tube, standup paddleboard or lifejacket and catch the solar show while floating on the river.

The event will start at 8:30 a.m. Monday at the East Bank Esplanade, below Portland Fire and Rescue Station 21.

The Portland area is just outside the path of totality, but will get a 99.4 percent view of the eclipse.

The unconventional viewing party was inspired by the work of the Human Access Project, an organization that aims to transform Portland’s relationship with the Willamette River and to inspire people to cherish, preserve and enjoy the waterway.

Middlebrook is a member of the organization’s board of directors and regularly participates in group-swim outings through its River Huggers Swim Team, which hosts dips in the Willamette River every weekday. The group is open to all ages and all abilities. Their main goal to have fun and raise public awareness that the Willamette River is safe for swimming.

It was at one of these swims that someone first floated the idea for an eclipse water party.

“We were swimming together on this gorgeous sun-drenched morning when someone suggested a group float for the solar eclipse,” Middlebrook said. “As soon as it was out there, it was so obvious that it should happen because it will be such a fun way to simultaneously enjoy the river and the eclipse.”

Event organizers hope that people will see this event as an opportunity to catch the eclipse in an environmentally friendly way. They are encouraging folks to skip the heavy traffic and bike, walk or skateboard down to the river for a fully human-powered eclipse experience.

“We want to help people see the eclipse without burning gas,” Middlebrook said.

Middlebrook promises the river is currently at a comfortable temperature and is quick to confirm that it is both safe and amazing for swimming.

“Once you start using the Willamette River, you’ll keep going back,” she said. “The river is Portland’s largest public space and there are so many great beaches and docks to access it. I hope the eclipse helps some new folks realize what an amazing resource the Willamette River is.”

Middlebrook’s academic specialty is poetry, which she believes offers another great way to enhance the eclipse experience. She encourages eclipse enthusiasts to peruse some poetry before Monday to enrich their sun and moon gazing.

“Spend a little time looking for a poem about the sun or the moon and keep that in mind while you’re watching the eclipse,” she urged. “This phenomenon has created a lot of new excitement for us but poets have been reflecting on the sun and the moon for a very long time.”

A few of her personal favorites include William Shakespeare’s “Fear no more the heat o’ the sun,” Robert Louis Stevenson’s “The face of the moon,” Emily Dickinson’s “The Moon was but a chin of gold,” Henry David Thoreau’s “I am the Autumnal Sun,” Lucille Clifton’s “Raccoon Prayer” and Denis Johnson’s “The White Fires of Venus.”

—By Emily Halnon, University Communications

May 2, 2017

Languages Out Loud

Join Romance Languages Faculty and Students Wednesday May 3, 2017 at the EMU Amphitheatre for Languages Out Loud! An open celebration of our Multilingual Campus.

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January 9, 2017

LALISA Conference: April 13-15

Program for LALISA and Conference registration available here!

CALL FOR PAPERS: 2nd LALISA CONFERENCE: April 13-15 2017 (already closed)

From Catalonia to California, Cuba, Chile, to all the many areas impacted by the long Iberian expansion that started in the 15th century, the foundational divisions of center and periphery have constituted cultural and social spaces where languages, bodies, ethnicities, and alternate mappings have resisted colonial hegemonic practices and institutions. According to Mexican philosopher Leopoldo Zea (1912-2004) the peripheral mappings within which Spain and Portugal were placed in the early modern period positioned their colonial territories at “the periphery of a periphery.” Decolonial movements and theoretical discussions have critically revisited the concept of periphery and problematized the discussion with new terms such as Gloria Anzaldúa’s “nepantilism” (“being between crossroads”) and her post-binary discussion of mestizo/a identities. Following on the fruitful discussions of our inaugural conference at Reed College in the spring of 2016, our Second Conference of LALISA at the University of Oregon aims to investigate the validity and contemporary currency of the center-periphery model as a way to understand Latin American, Latino/a, and Iberian cultural productions and social formations. We expect to receive papers from various disciplines across the humanities and the social sciences that will deal with issues related to the central themes of the conference:

Center/periphery; Peripheral knowledges and identities; Colonial and postcolonial cartographies; Spatial identifications; Walls, borders, and the end of globalization; Eurocentrism, white supremacist geographies of exclusion; Environmental humanities; Global/local; Postcoloniality in the post-Hispanic world; Gender formations in the peripheries of modernity; Virtual borders, zones of influence, divisions; Regionalism and nationalism, postnationalism, and neonationalism; Space and the modern/premodern/postmodern debate; Latinidad/hispanidad/indigenismo; Enrique Dusell’s concepts “underside of modernity, Transmodernity”; Marginalization and economic oppression; Racial peripheries, racialized bodies and places; Transatlantic crossings, hemispheric displacements, migrations, diasporas.

Abstracts should include a full title, a 300-word description of the paper, and the institutional affiliation of the presenter. Papers will be accepted in Spanish, Portuguese, and English. Please direct your enquiries and abstract submissions to lalisa@uoregon.edu

Peripheral Mappings:

Social and Cultural Geographies from the Underside of Modernity

Deadline for receipt of abstracts is January 30th.

Confirmations and a full program will be made available in February. A selection of revised papers presented at the conference will be published in the new UO-based online journal Periphērica: Journal of Social, Cultural, and Literary History in 2017/18.

The conference fee ($50 for faculty, $25 for graduate students) will include light breakfast and lunches on Friday and Saturday; a conference dinner ($45) on Friday will be available for those wishing to attend. Presenters will need to be members of the LALISA association at lalisa.org in order to attend the conference and the business meeting on Saturday, April 15th.

 

October 3, 2016

Opportunities Fair for Romance Language Students

Thursday, October 20th 12:00-3:00 p.m.
Gerlinger Lounge (2nd floor, via main entrance on University St.)

Please join us for refreshments & useful ideas on ways to use your French, Italian, Portuguese & Spanish language skills and cultural knowledge locally and internationally:
Major/Minor Requirements in our department
Graduate Study
Spanish Heritage Language Program
College of Education & Teaching Certification Programs
Teach in France, Italy & Spain
Peace Corps
National Student Exchange (study in Québec or Puerto Rico!)
Latin American Studies
European Studies
Teaching and Learning Center
Career Center
Second Language Acquisition in Teaching (SLAT) Certificate
Study and Internships Abroad & in Lane County

June 14, 2016

Commencement 2016!!!

RL Celebrates its graduates. Congratulations to the class of 2016!

The Romance Languages 2016 Commencement Ceremony took place on Monday, June 13th.  The event was a held outdoors in the EMU Amphitheater. Congratulations to all of the graduates!!  A special congratulations is order for the MA graduates (Elena Delgado Vazquez, Alizée Guillou, Marie Rodiet, Maureen Toussieux, Elizabeth Valdez, Javier Velasco) and RL newly minted Doctors, Alvaro Ares, Vania Diaz Romero Paz, Sandra Mefoude Obiono, Erin Moberg, Luz Romero Montano, Aara Zweifel.

Arika & Senna DSCN4289 DSCN4301 DSCN4305 DSCN4316 DSCN4326 DSCN4329 Elizabeth & Marie DSCN4259

April 29, 2016

Spring Film Series. Ayotzinapa: Crónica de un crimen de estado

May 4th, 2016 5:00 p.m. Straub 156

Film Viewing: Ayotzinapa: Crónica de un crimen de estado

Ayotzinapa: Chronicle of a Crime of State is the story of the forced disappearance of 43 student teachers, which exposes the criminal complicity between the police and military authorities, and the political and economic elite of Mexico. TRT 101 minutes.

April 26, 2016

Round Table Conversation and Public Presentation: David Scott (Columbia University)

Wednesday, April 27, “RL 623: Comparative Modernities”, co-taught by Cory Browning and Mayra Bottaro, will host Professor David Scott on our campus. His visit is part of the Annual RL 623 Speaker Series. We will have a Round Table Conversation with UO Faculty and graduate students from 3:30-5pm in Chapman Hall 202, and a public presentation “Michael Manley’s Styles of Radical Will” at 6-7:30pm in Lillis 112. We hope you can join us for one or both of these events!

Event co-sponsored by: Romance Languages Department, English Department, COLT, European Studies Program, Latin American Studies Program, College of Arts and Sciences, Oregon Humanities Center.

Professor David Scott’s work has been concerned with the reconceptualization of the way we think the story of the colonial past for the postcolonial present. His work has been highly influential in areas beyond the field of Anthropology. He is the author of Refashioning Futures (1999), Conscripts of Modernity (2004), Omens of Adversity (2014), and has recently completed a book called Stuart Hall’s Voice: Intimations of an Ethics of Receptive Generosity (based on his lectures at the University of the Western Cape, South Africa, in November-December 2013). He is currently working on a biography of Stuart Hall and on a study of the question of reparations for the historical injustice of New World slavery. He is the editor of Small Axe, and director of the Small Axe Project, which is involved in

April 14, 2016

Brazilian author Salgado Maranhão and his translator Alexis Levitin

Monday, April 18th, RL, LAS and Translation Studies will host Brazilian Poet Salgado Maranhão and translator Alexis Levitin on our campus. We will have a Brown Bag @ 12pm at the Mills International Center and a public bilingual reading/discussion at 4:30pm at the Browsing Room in the Knight Library. I hope you can join us for some of these event! Find below a short bio on both Salgado Maranhão and Alexis Levitin.
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Salgado Maranhão won the prestigious Prêmio Jabuti in 1999 with Mural of Winds. In 2011, The Color of the Word won the Brazilian Academy of Letters highest poetry award. In 2014, the Brazilian PEN Club chose his recent collection, Mapping the Tribe, as best book of poetry for the year. In 2015 the Brazilian Writers Union gave him first prize, again for The Color of the Word. His newest book is Opera of Nos, launching in September in Rio de Janeiro. In addition to ten books of poetry, he has written song lyrics and made recordings with some of Brazil’s leading jazz and pop musicians. His work has appeared in numerous magazines in the USA, including Bitter Oleander, BOMB, Cream City Review, Dirty Goat, Florida Review, Massachusetts Review, and Spoon River Poetry Review. Here in the USA, he is represented by two bilingual collections of poetry: Blood of the Sun (Milkweed Editions, 2012) and Tiger Fur (White Pine Press, 2015).
Alexis Levitin’s thirty-nine books of translation include Clarice Lispector’s Soulstorm and Eugenio de Andrade’s Forbidden Words, both from New Directions. Recent books include Salgado Maranhão’s Blood of the Sun (Milkweed Editions, 2012), Eugenio de Andrade’s The Art of Patience (Red Dragonfly Press, 2013), Ana Minga’s Tobacco Dogs (The Bitter Oleander Press, 2013), Santiago Vizcaino’s Destruction in the Afternoon (Diálogos Books, 2015), Sophia de Mello Breyner Andresen’s Exemplary Tales (Tagus Press, 2015) and Salgado Maranhão’s Tiger Fur (White Pine Press, 2015). In 2012, Levitin and Maranhao completed a three month reading tour of the USA, visiting over fifty colleges and other institutions. In tre spring of 2016, they will be reading from Blood of the Sun and Tiger Fur in the Northeast, the Midwest, and the West Coast.

February 11, 2016

Third Annual Symposium on Spanish as a Heritage Language (SSHL) at UO Feb 18-20

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