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February 24, 2020

UO Faculty Publish Volume on Transatlantic Studies

Associate Professors Cecilia Enjuto-Rangel and Pedro García-Caro published in November of 2019 the volume Transatlantic Studies: Latin America, Africa, Iberia (Liverpool UP, 2019) with contributions by 35 scholars from universities in the US, Mexico, Spain, and the UK. The book is the result of several years of team work with co-editors Sebastiaan Faber (Oberlin College) and Robert Newcomb (UC Davis) and the international group of scholars who took part in a 2013 Symposium at the UO organized by Prof. Enjuto-Rangel with the help of others.

 

RL Professors Gina Herrmann and Lanie Millar also participated in this collective effort, showcasing the strong emphasis in Transatlantic Studies among our Spanish faculty. The book has been made available online to UO Library users here.

The book seeks to deepen our understanding of comparative paradigms and to challenge the nation-state as the central epistemic frame to define and discuss contemporary culture.

According to Luis Martín-Cabrera, UC San Diego: “This volume is, without a doubt, the first attempt to fully theorize the disciplinary practices associated with the umbrella term “transatlantic studies”. Furthermore, it promises to provincialize, once and for all, Iberian Studies as well as to open Latin American Studies to a more radical and cosmopolitan critical practice.”

December 16, 2019

Fabienne Moore publishes article on Gustave Doré’s early works

Over the past three summers Associate Professor Professor of French Fabienne Moore has been researching the early illustrated albums of 19th century French artist Gustave Doré in his native city of Strasbourg, France. The Bibliothèque des Musées holds all first editions of Doré’s work, as well as periodicals in which he published his first drawings. In the rare book room of the Bibliothèque Universitaire, Moore was also able to hold an engraved printing block used for his illustrations of the Aventures du Baron de Munchausen. But while Doré is best known for his illustrations of the masterpieces of world literature, he began his career with four innovative sequential graphic narratives, one of which is the focus of Moore’s article titled “Gustave Doré’s Histoire de la Sainte Russie (1854): The Invention of Graphic Rhetoric, or the Artist At War.” Published in Dix-Neuf, the online Journal of the Society of Dix-Neuviémistes, the article contains thirty illustrations and examines Doré’s tour de force in addressing the violence of war via a caricatural history of Russia in ways that anticipates modern bande dessinée tackling twentieth-century warfare.
It was a chance encounter with a facsimile of Doré’s album on the shelves of the UO Knight Library several years ago that spurred Moore to teach and write about Doré’s 1854 Histoire de la Sainte Russie. Here was an “unidentified literary object” as Moore likes to put it to her students. About Russian history, triggered by the Crimean War, written in French, with over 500 sequential drawings and irreverent captions full of double entendre and literary references, whose reception so bitterly disappointed Doré that he never referred to it again, the book occupies an in-between that has kept it mostly out of sight of art historians and literary critics. Interpreted with the multidisciplinary lens of comic studies and highlighted for its modernity, Doré’s early work finally finds the attention and audience it craved back in 1854.

This research was made possible by the College of Arts and Sciences Summer Stipend for the Humanities and a Summer Research Award from the Office of the Vice-President for Research.

 

 

November 15, 2019

Garvin to Deliver Keynote Address at Rutgers

“Voices,” a conference sponsored by the Italian Graduate Society at Rutgers University, will be held on November 22-23, 2019 and will feature Diana Garvin, Assistant Professor of Italian in our Department of Romance Languages. Here’s a link to the program.

Garvin conducted her postdoctoral research at the American Academy in Rome as the 2017-2018 Rome Prize winner for Modern Italian Studies. Garvin’s research examines the history of everyday life across Fascist Italy and Italian East Africa (modern-day Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Somalia) through decolonial methodology and feminist approaches to the archive.  Specifically, she uses food as a lens to examine daily negotiations of power, demonstrating how women’s work to feed their families speaks to broader questions of gendered forms of labor, the social construction of race and racism, and what is at stake in the struggle for nourishment and for flavor both in multi-ethnic Italy and across the global south.

Garvin’s most recent publication, “Reproductive Health Care from Fascism to Forza Nuova” is under contract with Signs.  Her last article, “Singing Truth to Power: Melodic Resistance and Bodily Revolt,” was awarded the 2017 Working Class Studies Association John Russo & Sherry Linkon Award for Best Article. In Spring 2015, Critical Inquiry published Garvin’s article “Taylorist Breastfeeding in Rationalist Clinics: Constructing Industrial Motherhood in Fascist Italy,” in which she discusses the medical history of women’s reproductive work.  Past publications include translated essays from biopolitics theorists Antonio Negri and Roberto Esposito, as well as original essays in the edited volumes like The Routledge Companion to Sexuality and ColonialismRepresenting Italy through Food, and Food and Material Culture.​

October 29, 2018

RL professor Diana Garvin illuminates Italy’s coffee-drinking history

Curious about the origins of some of Italy’s espresso traditions? Diana Garvin, specialist in Mediterranean studies with a focus on food history in Italy, offers some background in two recent articles: A Brief History of the Caffè Corretto and Barley Coffee: It’s Just as Good as it Sounds. Garvin is working on a project exploring the Fascist period history of Italian coffee.

April 2, 2018

García-Caro Contributes to Cambridge History of Latina/o American Literature

Pedro Garcia-Caro has recently published a book chapter entitled “Performing to a Captive Audience: Dramatic Encounters in the Borderlands of Empire.” The Cambridge History of Latina/o American Literature edited by John Morán González and Laura Lomas. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018. 51-73. 
In his chapter García-Caro contours different practices of cultural performance by Spanish conquistadors and settlers in areas that would go on to become part of the US throughout the nineteenth century. From the early military campaigns and displays of religious and military power staging the colonial “claim” to the land through the “Requerimiento” in the sixteenth century, the staging of miracles and dance-dramas, through to satirical drama in the eighteenth century, public performance underlines the formation of cultural captivity of the colonized indigenous others, while increasingly revealing the divide and competition between religious and secular cultural agendas in the Spanish-speaking colonial space. García-Caro offers a comprehensive survey of the configuration of cultural hegemonies around public performance which relegated indigenous agency and cultural legitimacy to the role of spectator of incoming imperial narratives. Drawing from his recent research on the first Californio secular play Astucias por heredar, and contextualizing the long history of Hispanic colonial presence in the North American continent, García-Caro proposes an original framework to consider the relation of colonial cultural production as constantly tied to the objective of control, acculturation, and domination.
March 16, 2018

Hester publishes article on baroque poetry about Christopher Columbus

This essay examines Girolamo Graziani’s well-received epic poem, Il Conquisto di Granata (The Conquest of Granada, 1650), as a compelling piece of an Italian genealogy of New World Italian epic poetry, to which corpus the Conquisto belongs, despite its title. Indeed, in a convenient reworking of the historical timeline, the Columbus of this work returns to Spain from his first voyage to the Americas in time to fight the Moors of Granada, and he plays a decisive role in their defeat. The poetic project of the Conquisto incorporates three main aims: to address and remedy criticisms leveled against earlier Italian epic poetry about the New World, to establish Columbus as the narrative and ideological link between Conquest and Reconquest and, more broadly, to maintain the international status of Italian letters at a time when deeds and facts—expansion, colonialism—come to define the prestige of European proto-nations.

Hester, Nathalie. “Baroque Italian Epic from Granada to the New World: Columbus Conquers the Moors.” The Discovery of the New World in Early Modern Italy: Encounters with the Americas in the 16th-18th Centuries. Eds. Elizabeth Horodowich and Lia Markey. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2017. 270-287.

February 22, 2018

García-Caro Publishes First Californio Drama

Astucias por heredar, un sobrino a un tío (1789) by Fermín de Reygadas has recently come out as an e-book available on different electronic formats. It is a critical, annotated, edition with a detailed introduction to the context, the author, and the provenance of this comedy. According to the oral and written sources surrounding its donation to the Bancroft collection (which forms the basis for UC Berkeley’s Library) by Californio historian Guadalupe Vallejo, Astucias was “the first drama performed in California after its foundation” as a Spanish colony in 1769.

García-Caro’s groundbreaking research has located the source of the play in Mexico, including the censorship files which had banned it from the Mexican stage in 1790, and has traced the likely place of its performance, in the secular Villa de Branciforte, in what is now Eastern Santa Cruz. This play is a Neoclassic comedy which clearly draws heavily from French and Italian sources but is profoundly familiar with Spanish literary traditions as well and completely adapted for a Hispano-Mexican audience. The fact that it remained in manuscript form and has never before been printed or published has meant that the text remained uncensored with all its original lines, which include a large number of improprieties that could have otherwise been lost along the way.

It is a rare find as we have relatively scant information and little textual evidence of the kind of cultural production that secular Hispanic settlers engaged in or brought with them as they populated the emerging network of villas and pueblos in what is now the US South West in the 17th and 18th centuries.

The play is now available through Arte Público Press, the preeminent publisher of contemporary Latino and Recovered US Hispanic Literature. Teatro Milagro in Portland took up Prof. García-Caro’s proposal to stage this original play and shows run February 9th to March 3rd in Spanish with English superscripts. Early reviews of the production are raving about the currency of the topics and the humorous exchanges, as well as the vibrancy of the language. The troupe of actors at Teatro Milagro comes from a diverse set of backgrounds from all over the Spanish-speaking Americas, and is working under the direction of commedia dell’arte expert Robi Arce, from Puerto Rico. Prof. García-Caro and theatre Director Robi Arce participated on February 16th in a roundtable at Portland State University, a recording is available here.

Watch Latino Network TV news on the play!

February 15, 2018

The Center for Open Educational Resources for Language Learning has given the RL a Badge as “OER Master Creators”

The Center for Open Educational Resources for Language Learning (COERLL) has given us a Badge as  “OER Master Creators”, for our work on the “Empowering Learners of Spanish” collection.

 

The Empowering Learners of Spanish project is published by the Center for Open Educational Resources for Language Learning (COERLL) at the University of Texas at Austin and funded by the U.S. Department of Education. Using a critical pedagogical approach, these activities teach sociolinguistics and critical inquiry into language ideologies. This collection reach over 250 students per year at institutions like the UO and Western Illinois University in addition to K-12 teaching workshops in Oregon, Texas, and Illinois.

The ELS project developers are,

Claudia Holguín Mendoza  (Romance Languages, University of Oregon)

Robert L. Davis (Romance Languages, University of Oregon)

Julie Weise (History, University of Oregon)

Kelley León Howarth (Romance Languages, University of Oregon)

Munia Cabal Jiménez (Western Illinois University)

January 17, 2018

Professor Amalia Gladhart co-edits a special issue of Latin American Theatre Review

Professor Amalia Gladhart co-edited, with Professor Priscilla Meléndez (Trinity College) a special issue of Latin American Theatre Review (51.1) in honor of distinguished scholar Sandra Messinger Cypress. The issue includes, in addition to a brief editors’ introduction, essays by thirteen prominent scholars of Latin American theatre.
Gladhart’s article  “Translation Plays: La Malinche y otros intérpretes,” examines by playwrights Sabina Berman, Roberto Cossa, Víctor Hugo Rascón Banda, and Griselda Gambaro, that place translators on stage in complex ways. Performed in front of an audience or on the spectators’ behalf, translation may serve either to include or to exclude spectators or characters in the action of a given scene as well as highlight and question many of the constitutive elements of theatre. Interpretation ultimately ties translation and theatre together, as a translation is always an interpretation, just as interpretation is always part of theatre.
November 20, 2017

The National Endowment for the Arts announced that Amalia Gladhart will receive an NEA Literature Translation Fellowship

The National Endowment for the Arts announced that Amalia Gladhart will receive an NEA Literature Translation Fellowship of $12,500. Gladhart is one of 22 Literature Translation Fellows for fiscal year 2018. In total, the NEA is recommending $300,000 in grants this round to support the new translation of fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry from 15 different languages into English.

 

The author of 30 novels, short story collections, and essays, Angélica Gorodischer (b. 1928) is known for her science fiction, fantasy, crime, and feminist writing. She is the recipient of numerous national and international awards, including the World Fantasy Award for Lifetime Achievement previously won by such writers as Ray Bradbury, Ursula K. Le Guin, and Stephen King. Published in 2005, Jaguars’ Tomb is a 218-page novel of 3 distinct parts that addresses the difficulty of representing absence, including those absences left by the abductions and disappearances that occurred during the military dictatorship in Argentina’s “Dirty War” of 1976-83. Each of the sections repeats images from the others and circles a central space that, though it serves different functions in each section, always has a sense of loss at its center.

 

 Amalia Gladhart is a translator and professor of Spanish at the University of Oregon and Head of the Department of Romance Languages. She has written widely on contemporary Latin American literature and performance. Her translations include The Potbellied Virgin and Beyond the Islands, both by Alicia Yánez Cossío; and Trafalgar, by Angélica Gorodischer. Her collection of prose poems, Detours, was published by Burnside Review Press. Her short fiction appears in Saranac ReviewThe FantasistAtticus ReviewEleven Eleven, and elsewhere.

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