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December 16, 2019

Delprat Translates Sepúlveda

 

Chilean poet and RL faculty Jesús Sepúlveda published six poems in the Francophone poetry review Exit, published in Montreal, Quebec, December 2019. The editor of this new issue points out that:

“finalement, vous pourrez découvrir les mots de Jesús Sepúlveda, poète chilien résidant aux États-Unis, qui, avec L’enfer, Le fascisme s’assoit à table, Moonlight, Le pont, El hacedor et Ville noire, propose des textes encore tout chauds, faisant écho aux différents remous qui secouent son pays d’origine.”

Sepúlveda was invited to collaborate on this issue by the review’s director, poet Stéphane Despatie, after they both met at the Trois-Rivières International Poetry Festival in October 2019. This festival is the most important Francophone poetry event in North America and this year the festival celebrated its 35th anniversary.

Sepúlveda’ poems in French were translated by Fabienne Delprat, nom de plume of RL French Professor Fabienne Moore.

The launch of the issue 97 of Exit, revue de poésie is scheduled for December 12th, 2019 at 5:00 pm at the bookstore Librairie Zone Libre in Montréal, Canada.

Fabienne Moore publishes article on Gustave Doré’s early works

Over the past three summers Associate Professor Professor of French Fabienne Moore has been researching the early illustrated albums of 19th century French artist Gustave Doré in his native city of Strasbourg, France. The Bibliothèque des Musées holds all first editions of Doré’s work, as well as periodicals in which he published his first drawings. In the rare book room of the Bibliothèque Universitaire, Moore was also able to hold an engraved printing block used for his illustrations of the Aventures du Baron de Munchausen. But while Doré is best known for his illustrations of the masterpieces of world literature, he began his career with four innovative sequential graphic narratives, one of which is the focus of Moore’s article titled “Gustave Doré’s Histoire de la Sainte Russie (1854): The Invention of Graphic Rhetoric, or the Artist At War.” Published in Dix-Neuf, the online Journal of the Society of Dix-Neuviémistes, the article contains thirty illustrations and examines Doré’s tour de force in addressing the violence of war via a caricatural history of Russia in ways that anticipates modern bande dessinée tackling twentieth-century warfare.
It was a chance encounter with a facsimile of Doré’s album on the shelves of the UO Knight Library several years ago that spurred Moore to teach and write about Doré’s 1854 Histoire de la Sainte Russie. Here was an “unidentified literary object” as Moore likes to put it to her students. About Russian history, triggered by the Crimean War, written in French, with over 500 sequential drawings and irreverent captions full of double entendre and literary references, whose reception so bitterly disappointed Doré that he never referred to it again, the book occupies an in-between that has kept it mostly out of sight of art historians and literary critics. Interpreted with the multidisciplinary lens of comic studies and highlighted for its modernity, Doré’s early work finally finds the attention and audience it craved back in 1854.

This research was made possible by the College of Arts and Sciences Summer Stipend for the Humanities and a Summer Research Award from the Office of the Vice-President for Research.

 

 

November 15, 2019

Garvin to Deliver Keynote Address at Rutgers

“Voices,” a conference sponsored by the Italian Graduate Society at Rutgers University, will be held on November 22-23, 2019 and will feature Diana Garvin, Assistant Professor of Italian in our Department of Romance Languages. Here’s a link to the program.

Garvin conducted her postdoctoral research at the American Academy in Rome as the 2017-2018 Rome Prize winner for Modern Italian Studies. Garvin’s research examines the history of everyday life across Fascist Italy and Italian East Africa (modern-day Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Somalia) through decolonial methodology and feminist approaches to the archive.  Specifically, she uses food as a lens to examine daily negotiations of power, demonstrating how women’s work to feed their families speaks to broader questions of gendered forms of labor, the social construction of race and racism, and what is at stake in the struggle for nourishment and for flavor both in multi-ethnic Italy and across the global south.

Garvin’s most recent publication, “Reproductive Health Care from Fascism to Forza Nuova” is under contract with Signs.  Her last article, “Singing Truth to Power: Melodic Resistance and Bodily Revolt,” was awarded the 2017 Working Class Studies Association John Russo & Sherry Linkon Award for Best Article. In Spring 2015, Critical Inquiry published Garvin’s article “Taylorist Breastfeeding in Rationalist Clinics: Constructing Industrial Motherhood in Fascist Italy,” in which she discusses the medical history of women’s reproductive work.  Past publications include translated essays from biopolitics theorists Antonio Negri and Roberto Esposito, as well as original essays in the edited volumes like The Routledge Companion to Sexuality and ColonialismRepresenting Italy through Food, and Food and Material Culture.​

November 14, 2019

Nov 15-16 Race, Racialization, & the Early Modern—Emerging Views

 

COLT invites you to join guests David Sterling Brown (SUNY Binghamton), Nick Jones (Bucknell U), Christina Lee (Princeton) and Marc Schacter (Durham, U.K.) and respondents Lara Bovilsky (ENG), Leah Middlebrook (COLT), Amanda Powell (RL) and David Wacks (RL) as we consider new research and emerging methodologies by which to approach the concepts of racialization, race, and emergent discourses of national, ethnic and religious identity in the early modern period. In particular, these discussions build from the insight that modern ideas about race were shaped in part by discourses of religious and ethnic sameness and difference that developed in medieval and early modern Iberia.

In addition to the scheduled research presentations and discussions, the symposium includes two open conversations, one focused on mentoring strategies for the 21st century and one focused on publishing venues.

The symposium runs from 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. on Friday and from 9-12:30 on Saturday. All events will be held in the Spruce and Cedar Rooms of the EMU.

Readings are available in advance, for those who would like to learn more about the research of our invited guests.

Please contact Leah Middlebrook (middlebr@uoregon.edu) for links to the readings, or with any questions.

Hope to see you there!

November 7, 2019

CLLAS Mixer | 11/22 | 12-2pm | EMU 23

Join us for the CLLAS Community Mixer!

What: An opportunity to mingle and build community as we welcome new faculty and staff working  on Latinx and Latin American Studies and with Latinx & Latin American students. Food and beverages will be provided.

When: Friday, November 22, 12pm-2pm

Where: Lease Crutcher Lewis, EMU 23

July 9, 2019

Jesús Sepúlveda wins first place in Oregon’s Spanish poetry competition

The Instituto de Cultura Oregoniana (ICO)—a non-profit organization that promotes the Spanish-speaking culture in Oregon and multilingualism as a source of common prosperity—awarded Chilean poet and RL instructor Jesús Sepúlveda the First Prize of Poetry in the “II Concurso de Poesía Oregoniana 2019” for his poem “Retablo de las maravillas.”

The award ceremony will take place in the Louks Auditorium at the Salem Public Library on July 13th, 2019 at 4:00 pm.

With this award, Sepúlveda finishes an academic year full of literary activities and invitations.

In 2018 Dr. Sepúlveda was invited to participate in the festival “Poetry on the Road” in Bremen, Germany; the 5th “Poésie Sauvage” Poetry Festival in La Salvetat-sur-Agoût, France; and the “Carruaje de pájaros” International Poetry Festival in Chiapas, Mexico.  Dr. Sepúlveda also spent a month in Germany as a writer-in-residence invited by the Sylt Foundation and toured Portugal presenting the Portuguese edition of his book The Garden of Peculiarities.

On March 2019 he was invited to the 11th International Poetry Festival in Puerto Rico, where the Proyecto Editorial La Chifurnia published Wirikuta—a selection of his poems.

Wirikuta by Jesús Sepúlveda

Sepúlveda’s poetry has been anthologized and featured in several publications. In 2018 two main Chilean anthologies included his work—Antología de poesía chilena. La generación post 87 and Antología de poesía chilena. His poetry also appeared in the two-volume anthology of American poetry The End of the World Project, published by Moria Press in Indiana.

Between spring 2018 and 2019, the Portuguese review Flauta de Luz, the German magazine Ostragehege, the Indian journal Six Seasons Review, and the American publication Fifth Estate published translations of Sepúlveda’s poems.

Dr. Sepúlveda with French poet Aurélia Lassaque

Dr. Sepúlveda with French poet Aurélia Lassaque

A plaquette with his poem “Platon”, translated by Dmitri Fragata and illustrated by French artist Marc Granier, was released in France while his poem “El fascismo se sienta a la mesa” (translated by UO alumna Elmira Louie) appeared in the newly online journal Periphērica edited by UO Professor Pedro García-Caro.

Sepúlveda with artist Marc Granier

Sepúlveda with artist Marc Granier

Jesús Sepúlveda was featured in Chellis Glendinning’s In the Company of Rebels (2019), a collection of portraits of artists and thinkers that gives an account of Sepúlveda’s biography and work, illustrating his commitment to poetry and world issues.

 

 

April 2, 2018

García-Caro Contributes to Cambridge History of Latina/o American Literature

Pedro Garcia-Caro has recently published a book chapter entitled “Performing to a Captive Audience: Dramatic Encounters in the Borderlands of Empire.” The Cambridge History of Latina/o American Literature edited by John Morán González and Laura Lomas. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018. 51-73. 
In his chapter García-Caro contours different practices of cultural performance by Spanish conquistadors and settlers in areas that would go on to become part of the US throughout the nineteenth century. From the early military campaigns and displays of religious and military power staging the colonial “claim” to the land through the “Requerimiento” in the sixteenth century, the staging of miracles and dance-dramas, through to satirical drama in the eighteenth century, public performance underlines the formation of cultural captivity of the colonized indigenous others, while increasingly revealing the divide and competition between religious and secular cultural agendas in the Spanish-speaking colonial space. García-Caro offers a comprehensive survey of the configuration of cultural hegemonies around public performance which relegated indigenous agency and cultural legitimacy to the role of spectator of incoming imperial narratives. Drawing from his recent research on the first Californio secular play Astucias por heredar, and contextualizing the long history of Hispanic colonial presence in the North American continent, García-Caro proposes an original framework to consider the relation of colonial cultural production as constantly tied to the objective of control, acculturation, and domination.
March 10, 2018

Leah Middlebrook in Tanner Lecture Series

On March 19, Leah Middlebrook will deliver a public lecture at Utah State University, as part of the Tanner Lecture Series. The talk, taken from her book-in-progress, is titled “The View from Thebes: Framing Poetry for the 21st Century.”

 

March 6, 2018

Middlebrook on Why Read Don Quijote?

In February, Leah Middlebrook spoke at a panel on Why Read Don Quijote Now? as part of the U.C. Berkeley Designated Emphasis on Renaissance and Early Modern Studies’ series “Why Read…?” Her short talk, titled “Knight + Duenna as a Way of Life,” took a twenty-first century look at the theme of friendship in the novel.

CLLAS Symposium

Justice Across Borders: Gender, Race, and Migration in the Americas

March 8, 2018
Knight Library, Browsing Room, 1501 Kincaid St.
Gerlinger Lounge, 1468 University St.
Free & open to the public

Our thematic line of inquiry this year: America, Bridge Between Oceans poses the following questions: What happens when we put the Atlantic world in conversation with the Pacific? What kind of art and cultural production emerges? Which stories of struggles for racial, economic, gender and environmental justice arise? How does looking at Latinx and Latin American Studies from within the Pacific Rim region open up innovative and necessary methodological and analytical horizons? These questions also inspire our symposium Justice Across Borders: Gender, Race, and Migration in the Americas.

Fostering conversations about race, ethnicity, diasporas, gender, sexuality, migration, environmental justice, and culture that bridge the Atlantic and Pacific world, the symposium Justice Across Borders: Gender, Race, and Migration in the Americas explores what kind of new knowledges, art, social transformations, and activism we can create together in the face of increasing inequalities and social violence across the continent. We meditate on what contributions emerge from Pacific Rim-based research, art, advocacy work, and political movements when we put ourselves in conversation with scholars, artists, and activists based in the Atlantic coast.  We will discuss the increasing visibility of Caribbean migrants in the Pacific Northwest, environmental justice issues in Mexico, the U.S., Puerto Rico and the Southern Cone, archipelagic studies that encompass Caribbean and Pacific islands, gender politics within Latin American and Latinx communities in Oregon, experiences of Latin Americans alongside Pacific Islanders in the Pacific Rim region, queer Latina and AfroLatin@ art, indigeneity, blackness and Jewish diasporas in Latin America, challenges faced by a variety of Latinx communities in the U.S., etc. From a Latinx and Latin American Studies perspective, we engage comparative and relational dialogues with fields such as Pacific Islander Studies, Asian and Asian American Studies, Black Studies, Native American Studies, among others, hoping to bring new light into the epistemic possibilities of our fields and the meaning of Justice for all of us.

Symposium organizer: Alaí Reyes-Santos

Full list of affiliations

9:00 – 9:15 AM (Browsing Room)
Welcome from UO administration officials, CLLAS director, symposium coordinator.

9:20-10:30 AM (Browsing Room)
Race, Ethnicity and Diasporas
Rocio ZambranaLanie Millar, Roberto Arroyo
Chair: Marta Maldonado

10:40-11:50 AM (Browsing Room)
Women and Gender in Latin America and U.S. Latinx communities
Vicky Falcon, Michelle McKinleyKristin YarrisLynn StephenGabriela Martinez
Chair: Vicky Falcon,  Instituto de Cultura Oregoniana

12:00- 1:00 PM (Gerlinger Alumni Lounge)
Keynote Speaker/Lunch

“New Directions in Latinx and Latin American Studies: Archipelagos Across the Caribbean and the Pacific”
Guest: Yolanda Martinez-San Miguel
Chair: Rocio Zambrana and Lanie Millar

2:00-3:00 PM (Browsing Room)
Environmental Justice in the Americas
Judith Vega; David VazquezSarah WaldAnalisa TaylorPedro Garcia-Caro
Chair: David Vazquez

3:10 – 4:30 PM Roundtable (Browsing Room)
“Art, Migration, and Political Activism: Caribbean and Pacific Islander Migrants in the Pacific”
[SPONSORS: Department of Ethnic Studies, the Wayne Morse Center for Law & Politics, and the Center for Asia and Pacific Studies (CAPS)]
Panelists:  Judith Sierra-Rivera; JoAnna Poblete; Philipp Carrasco, Oregon AFL-CIO; Ileana Rodriguez Silva; Joyce Pualani Warren; and Jannes Martinez, Iyalocha, Lukumi priestess
Chair: Alaí Reyes-Santos

4:40PM – 5:40 PM  Plenary Session (Browsing Room)
“Latinx Communities: Questions, Challenges, and Transformations”
Monica Rojas, Director, Movimiento AfroLatino de Seattle; Laura Pulido; Ramona Hernández; Edwin Melendez, Director, Center for Puerto Rican Studies
Chair: Gerardo Sandoval

6:00 PM – 7:30 PM (Gerlinger Alumni Lounge)
RiffiandoDominican Artists in the House! A Talk/Reading/Performance
Josefina BaezAna-Maurine Lara, and Ernesto Lara
Coordinator: Ana-Maurine Lara

Light Dinner/Reception

Sponsored by the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS); Wayne Morse Center for Law & Politics; UO College of Arts and Sciences; The Office of the Provost; Center for the Study of Women in Society (CSWS); Latin American Studies program; Department of English; Department of Romance Languages; Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; Department of Anthropology; School of Journalism and Communication; Department of Philosophy; the Center for Asia and Pacific Studies (CAPS); the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA); Department of Ethnic Studies; Global Studies Institute, and the Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides (NCAP).

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