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November 21, 2017

Chile in Conversation: Lectura de Poesía – Poetry Reading

Jesús Sepúlveda reads from his most recent poetry book Espejo de detalles. November 21, 4:30-6:00 – Mills International Lounge (EMU). 

Latin American Studies Book Presentation Series: Chile in Conversation.

October 30, 2017

“Queering Internal Exile on Italian Screen” a Public Lecture by Prof. Dana Renga

On Thursday Nov. 16th Prof. Renga (Chair of Italian and French at Ohio State University) will give a lecture on the forced exile of several homosexual inmates during fascism as represented and memorialized in a number of Italian documentaries and fiction films.

Gerlinger Lounge
Nov. 16th (5pm)

In 2003, multi-term ex-prime minister of Italy Silvio Berlusconi stated: ‘I understand the difficulties of teaching democracy to a people who for nearly forty years have known only dictatorship.’ Interviewer Nicholas Farrell prompted: ‘Like Italy at the fall of Fascism.’ To this, Berlusconi infamously declared ‘That was a much more benign dictatorship; Mussolini did not murder anyone. Mussolini sent people on holidays to confine them to banishment to small islands such as Ponza or Maddalena which are now exclusive resorts.’ The promotion of internal exile (‘confino’) as holiday is particularly interesting when considering the experience of men sent to the islands for suspicion of ‘pederasty’ (as it was referred to at the time). As this talk discusses, gay men found a certain amount of freedom on an island prison where conditions were grim, barracks were overcrowded, illness was rampant, jobs were unavailable, and the average stipend was only four lire per day. At the same time, the experience of gay men sent into internal exile is cloaked in silence. The lecture interrogates this silence by looking at two feature films, three documentaries, and a graphic novel that treat, to different degrees, the experiences of gay men sent into internal exile.

 

 

October 25, 2017

2017 RL MA students rejoice post forum performance

On Friday, October 20, 2017, from 12 to 5:30 pm, the RL department got together for the annual MA Fall Forum. This year, we listened to rich and wonderfully varied presentations by eleven second-year MA students who presented their research in a formal conference setting of four sessions chaired by doctoral students, followed by Q&A.

Check below the enclosed program to read the tantalizing abstracts!


Director of Graduate Studies Fabienne Moore and Graduate Coordinator Lena Cottam organized the event, a highlight of the MA program.

Congratulations to Yasmin, Stacey, Linguesh, Kiana, Laurel, Rafa, Miki, Riccardo, Lara, Austin and Peter for stimulating intellectual exchanges that are the foundation of our RL community.

October 19, 2017

Toño Martorell, Puerto Rican Artist Visits UO

Conversation (Q/A) with Puerto Rican artist Antonio Martorell on OCT 19 from 12pm-1:30pm at Crater Lake North EMU 146.

Please, sign up for this conversation (Q/A) by sending Cecilia Enjuto Rangel an email at enjuto@uoregon.edu. There is a limited space in this event and we want to know how many students, faculty members and members of the community are able to attend. Everyone is invited, please spread the word.

We also want to invite you attend his public lecture (free and open to everyone):

“Communication, Communion, and Confrontation in

Puerto Rican Art” by Antonio Martorell, Puerto Rican artist at

JSMA

Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

Ford Lecture Hall

THURSDAY | OCTOBER 19 | 4 PM

Sponsored by: Teaching Engagement Program:

Community Engagement Grant

Co-Sponsored by: Oregon Humanities Center, Latin

American Studies, Division of Equity and Inclusion,

Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, Romance Languages,

and Center for Latino/a & Latin American Studies.

Antonio Martorell is a visting artist at Linfield College. His exhibition,

“Rain/Lluvia” can be seen at the Linfield Art Gallery, opening October 16 and

continuing through November 18. It is his first exhibition in the Pacific NW.

September 25, 2017

Jesús Sepúlveda Travels to Cambodia to participate in Sylt Foundation’s program “Transformation and Identity, Trauma and Reconciliation”

For several years now the Sylt Foundation and its curator, Indra Wussow, have fostered a dialogue that breaks national borders between artists dealing with “Transformation and Identity, Trauma and Reconciliation” in their work, probing the legacies of Germany’s Fascism, South Africa’s Apartheid, Chile and Myanmar’s dictatorship, and Cambodia’s Khmer Rouge regime. Following a Sylt Foundation residency in South Africa in December 2017, Chilean poet and RL instructor Jesús Sepúlveda was invited to Cambodia from August 3-17, 2017 to meet with fellow poets and authors from Cambodia, Germany, and Myanmar, and numerous cultural agents invested in Cambodia’s past, present and future. Indra Wussow and co-curator Irene Leung organized a rich array of encounters: there was a dinner roundtable with choreographer and dancer Sophiline Cheam Shapiro who collaborated with oral historian Theresa den Langis and trauma psychologist Sylvia Johnson to create a ballet performance on forced marriages—one of the legacies of Pol Pot’s regime; there was a brunch and later an art opening with Java Arts’ gallery owner Dana Langlois focused on supporting emerging Cambodian visual artists and designers; a discussion with Cambodian curator Lyno Vuth and young artists in a newly created artist-run space, Sa Sa Art Projects. With German author Sasha Rey and Burmese poet Diu Ga Lay, Sepúlveda also participated in a translation workshop with aspiring Cambodian poets, exchanging poems and crafting translations into English and/or Khmer that culminated in a public, multilingual poetry reading at Meta House, the German Cambodian Cultural Center, sponsored by the Goethe Institute.

Translation workshop at Meta House on 8/8/2017

The group also attended the screening of Cambodia Son in a community theater. The 2014 documentary by Masashiro Sugano relates the odyssey of Kosal Khiev, now 37 years old, born in a refugee camp in Cambodia, exiled as a one-year old to California with his mother and siblings, falling into delinquency and jailed at 16 for the next 14 years; and deported to Cambodia, permanently banished from the USA. Kosal, who has become a spoken word artist, took questions from the audience, shared memories and hopes, performed his texts, and joined the Sylt Foundation fellows for dinner.

Spoken word artist Kosal Khiev with Indra Wussow, Jesús Sepúlveda, Diu Ga Lay and Chantha Lock on 9/8/2017

Another unforgettable encounter took place with Youk Chhang, founder and director of the Documentation Center of Cambodia (or DC-Cam). Himself a survivor, a refugee in the USA, and now a philanthropist and human rights advocate, he has a mission to document and educate about Khmer Rouges atrocities, bring justice to the victims, and heal with the curative powers of art and beauty. In addition to his archival research, Mr. Chhang commissioned late Lebanese celebrated architect Dame Zaha Hadid to design an exceptional building named the Sleuk Rith Institute that will serve as an archive, a museum, and a graduate research center for trauma studies in the heart of the Cambodian capital. The fellows toured the Documentation Center, observed the busy team of interns digitizing documents and testimonies, and the work of videographers, then visited the nearby Wat Langka temple to marvel at the funerary urns hidden from the Khmer Rouge and rediscovered by accident by Mr. Chhang. Across the boulevard, Cambodia’s main teacher’s college, the National Institute of Education, boasts an art gallery. As a parting gift to the group, Mr. Chhang gave everyone the Teacher’s Guidebook to the teaching of “a history of Democratic Kampuchea (1975-1979)” published by DC-Cam along with a textbook printed in the hundreds of thousands and distributed to all students in grade 9-12 (Kampuchea was the name of the Khmer Rouge state). “Genocide education is genocide prevention,” says the back cover.

Director of DC-Cam Youk Chhang with IndraWussow, Jesús Sepúlveda & Sasha Rey on 11/8/2017

Sepúlveda also delved into Cambodia’s contrasted history with an emotional visit to the Tuol Sleng Genocide Museum (a high school converted into a torture center by the Khmer Rouge), a tour of the Royal Palace, and excursions near the city of Siem Reap to the famed temples of Angkor Wat, Angkor Thom, Bantey Srei, and Preah Khan.

Grateful thanks go to the Sylt Foundation’s generosity and vision in making possible an essential cross-cultural, international dialogue among the arts on responding to trauma, on identity formation and transformation.

September 19, 2017

Sept 26-27: Chilean poet, Raúl ZURITA at UO

RAÚL ZURITA (1950) is one of Latin America’s most celebrated poets. His works include Purgatorio (1979), Anteparaíso (1982), Canto a su amor desaparecido (1985), La Vida Nueva (1994), INRI (2003) and Zurita (2011). Through his writings, Zurita chronicles the violent history of Chile’s military dictatorship as well as that of the Americas since the conquest. In 1979, along with other artists, he founded CADA, Colectivo de Acciones de Arte, an art action group dedicated to the creation of political art that would resist the military regime. In 1982, he composed a poem in the sky over New York, and in 1993 he bulldozed “ni pena ni miedo” (no pain no fear) into the coarse sands of the Desert of Atacama. Due to its dimensions, this line is only visible from the sky. Zurita was awarded the Chilean National Prize of Literature and a scholarship from the Guggenheim Foundation. He has been conferred two Doctor honoris causa degrees and is Professor emeritus at the Universidad Diego Portales.

 

Lunch Brown Bag Conversation in Spanish with the Poet

TUESDAY SEPT 26 at 12:00pm to 1:30am
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Lease Crutcher Lewis Room 023
1395 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403

POETRY Reading (in SPANISH)
WEDNESDAY SEPT 27 4pm-5:30pm
Browsing Room, Knight Library
(Q/A in Spanish and English)

The generous support of the College of Arts and Sciences Program Grant, the Oregon Humanities Center, the Translation Studies Working Group, Romance Languages, Comparative Literature, Latin American Studies, and the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS) makes this event possible. These events are free and open to the public.

 

Contact Prof. Cecilia Enjuto Rangel (enjuto@uoregon.edu) for a reservatiofor the Q/A session. We will meet at noon, so if you want to bring a brown bag lunch, you can.

May 2, 2017

Languages Out Loud

Join Romance Languages Faculty and Students Wednesday May 3, 2017 at the EMU Amphitheatre for Languages Out Loud! An open celebration of our Multilingual Campus.

Languages out Loud-flier-1c2mtk3

January 9, 2017

LALISA Conference: April 13-15

Program for LALISA and Conference registration available here!

CALL FOR PAPERS: 2nd LALISA CONFERENCE: April 13-15 2017 (already closed)

From Catalonia to California, Cuba, Chile, to all the many areas impacted by the long Iberian expansion that started in the 15th century, the foundational divisions of center and periphery have constituted cultural and social spaces where languages, bodies, ethnicities, and alternate mappings have resisted colonial hegemonic practices and institutions. According to Mexican philosopher Leopoldo Zea (1912-2004) the peripheral mappings within which Spain and Portugal were placed in the early modern period positioned their colonial territories at “the periphery of a periphery.” Decolonial movements and theoretical discussions have critically revisited the concept of periphery and problematized the discussion with new terms such as Gloria Anzaldúa’s “nepantilism” (“being between crossroads”) and her post-binary discussion of mestizo/a identities. Following on the fruitful discussions of our inaugural conference at Reed College in the spring of 2016, our Second Conference of LALISA at the University of Oregon aims to investigate the validity and contemporary currency of the center-periphery model as a way to understand Latin American, Latino/a, and Iberian cultural productions and social formations. We expect to receive papers from various disciplines across the humanities and the social sciences that will deal with issues related to the central themes of the conference:

Center/periphery; Peripheral knowledges and identities; Colonial and postcolonial cartographies; Spatial identifications; Walls, borders, and the end of globalization; Eurocentrism, white supremacist geographies of exclusion; Environmental humanities; Global/local; Postcoloniality in the post-Hispanic world; Gender formations in the peripheries of modernity; Virtual borders, zones of influence, divisions; Regionalism and nationalism, postnationalism, and neonationalism; Space and the modern/premodern/postmodern debate; Latinidad/hispanidad/indigenismo; Enrique Dusell’s concepts “underside of modernity, Transmodernity”; Marginalization and economic oppression; Racial peripheries, racialized bodies and places; Transatlantic crossings, hemispheric displacements, migrations, diasporas.

Abstracts should include a full title, a 300-word description of the paper, and the institutional affiliation of the presenter. Papers will be accepted in Spanish, Portuguese, and English. Please direct your enquiries and abstract submissions to lalisa@uoregon.edu

Peripheral Mappings:

Social and Cultural Geographies from the Underside of Modernity

Deadline for receipt of abstracts is January 30th.

Confirmations and a full program will be made available in February. A selection of revised papers presented at the conference will be published in the new UO-based online journal Periphērica: Journal of Social, Cultural, and Literary History in 2017/18.

The conference fee ($50 for faculty, $25 for graduate students) will include light breakfast and lunches on Friday and Saturday; a conference dinner ($45) on Friday will be available for those wishing to attend. Presenters will need to be members of the LALISA association at lalisa.org in order to attend the conference and the business meeting on Saturday, April 15th.

 

December 7, 2016

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS- RL Scholarships

The Department of Romance Languages now accepting applications for RL scholarships!!!

RL scholarships are open to current UO undergraduate and graduate students in the Romance Languages Department. Undergraduate students must be declared majors or minors in the Romance Languages Department at the time of application. In order to receive a scholarship award you must be enrolled at the UO as a full time student during the 2017/2018 academic year.

The completed application is due in the Romance Languages Office by Monday, February 6th, 2017.

For more information please visit: rl.uoregon.edu/scholarships

June 22, 2016

Gould addresses RL majors at 2016 Commencement

EvlynSpeaking

The following is the 2016 Romance Languages commencement address, given by  Evlyn Gould, CAS Distinguished Professor in the Humanities and Professor Emerita of French

 

Buenos días y bienvenidos; bona tarde y bemvindos;

Buona sera i benvenuti; bonjour et bienvenues…. Let your minds travel with those sounds for just a moment….

These are the sounds of other lands, other faces and other places, other smells and others tastes… These are the sounds of the Romance Languages in which we shall confer degrees today.

I am Evlyn Gould, Professor Emerita of French and I am delighted to be the one to address you today at these commencement ceremonies for the Dept. of Romance languages honoring the graduating class of 2016. Give yourselves a round of applause.

Commencement ceremonies… I am thoughtful because after 33 years of teaching at the UO, I, too, am graduating. We do think of this event as the end, end of the term, of the year, of our formal studies. Indeed, as of today, gone are the finals, gone are the demanding professors, the deadlines, the all-nighters. But commencement is not about that. From the French commencement or Italian, cominciare, or Spanish, comenzar, today is a new beginning, with new horizons of possibility before you, new responsibilities and your own assignments and deadlines… to set for yourselves.

You are entering a world of networks, a world of continual communications and continual connection, a world of inters: Inter-disciplinarity, international markets, inter-ethnic conflicts, interactions of all sorts with long-distance migrants and immigrants, a world of environmental inter-dependence. As students with expertise in languages other than English, your reach through these networks is potentially extensive. You may find yourself making instantaneous translations for the other side of the world, (or slow and painful ones that anguish over just the right expression for that culturally specific foreign idea that you want to translate for people here in the US); you may travel to the other side of the world with regularity, or you may stay there awhile to improve living conditions, the soil, the housing or the crops in Uruguay, in Mexico, in Spain, in Chad, in Lampedusa, in Morocco or in Egypt. You may practice international law or work in international tourism. You may stay right here in the Pacific North West and still serve people on the other side of the world with a flick or a click of the hand. You may teach in multi-ethnic, multi-cultured schools, or you may teach Oregonians about these other communities; you may invest your time aiding transcriptions in hospitals, in banks, or in refugee centers, or you may simply invest your great earnings in the global market economy. However you deploy the learning and experience you have engaged over your years at UO, you will be GLOBAL CITIZENS.

What are global citizens? Let me say quickly that they are not the clichéd unit of speech designed to be mere fodder for political rhetoric, nor are they a way to designate the impersonality of transactions required by technology. Rather, according to a recent report on US education: global citizens are rarer than we might think for these are individuals—and I quote–who…. “are aware of the global nature of societal issues, care about people in distant places, understand the nature of global economic integration, appreciate the interconnectedness and interdependence of people, respect and protect cultural diversity, fight for social justice for all, and protect planet Earth—home for all human beings” (Zhao 2010).

The US has struggled with the goal of creating curricula designed to promote global citizenship because of a feeling of isolation, a century of international dominance, the perception that globalized themes are insurmountable and that many of the issues we face as ‘global citizens” remain controversial or just plan hard to talk about: how are our values shaped by location, by poverty or by wealth, by safety or war, or famine, by religion, by geographic displacement or by climate chaos? But where the US has fallen short, we in the Dept of Romance Languages excel! By studying second, third, or even fourth languages and their literatures at UO and by steeping in the rich cultures and lifestyles they have shaped, you have improved your ability to cross many of these social, geographic, economic, and cultural divides.

Today, with unprecedented speed, we are, as Gustave Flaubert wrote in the increasingly industrialized mid-19th century, “everywhere and nowhere at once.” And what are the tools that will be necessary for this (acceleration) and its constant demand to re-position your energies and intentions? Well…, this continual re-location requires a certain eco-location. … (and not because we’ll all be underwater…) Like our friends in the sea, to eco-locate is to perceive the sounds around us, to move in response to them, hear the melodies of languages, knowing that those melodies represent the souls of people. Ever more than technology, social networking across language barriers, and deep sensitivities to cultural and economic divides, to religious differences, to varied ethnicities (genders and values), and to the many-splendored ideas about what constitutes the good life… in this world of ours, these will be the skills central to everyday communication and to the preservation of our planet for the future.

Now a closing to word to parents and families and then to you graduates:

Parents and families, your investment has been a good one—in the future of your students and in our future. Students with liberal arts education who spend time in the company of other languages learn to feel different emotions, to rehearse different passions, to experience different sacred rituals and to hear the world in different ways. They may take longer to find their own satisfying niches in the working world, but research shows that they will be happier and live longer lives in the long run. Moreover, I might also point out that recent brain research has revealed that studying second and third languages increases brain plasticity. It actually has health benefits… It opens new pathways in the cerebral cortex and quickens the synapses making for better adaptation to the speeding world.

Students, join me now in thanking your parents and families for doing their best to outfit you for a world they cannot themselves yet imagine.

Graduates, … YOU are thinkers and readers. You have learned to discern, beneath the surfaces of texts, the voices and stories of other hearts yearning. You have learned to ask the big questions literature asks: about life, love, politics, death, and meaning. You are people poised to challenge the intoxications of immediate gratification, peoples poised in ethical responsiveness before an often unfair world, people who know how to listen and how to become silent so as to hear the Earth crying out. I have spoken with many of you. I know you have great ideas for using global advertising to improve the environment, for deploying new business strategies to improve lives, food and access, for publishing and speaking in new ways that diminish discrimination, and promote equanimity rather than promoting the fears of scarcity thinking. I for one am glad to have you on my team. I congratulate you heartily. May you take up your participation in a global citizenry in responsible and thoughtful ways and may you understand that your particular way of participating is absolutely essential to the whole. Thank you.

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