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May 2, 2017

Languages Out Loud

Join Romance Languages Faculty and Students Wednesday May 3, 2017 at the EMU Amphitheatre for Languages Out Loud! An open celebration of our Multilingual Campus.

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January 9, 2017

LALISA Conference: April 13-15

Program for LALISA and Conference registration available here!

CALL FOR PAPERS: 2nd LALISA CONFERENCE: April 13-15 2017 (already closed)

From Catalonia to California, Cuba, Chile, to all the many areas impacted by the long Iberian expansion that started in the 15th century, the foundational divisions of center and periphery have constituted cultural and social spaces where languages, bodies, ethnicities, and alternate mappings have resisted colonial hegemonic practices and institutions. According to Mexican philosopher Leopoldo Zea (1912-2004) the peripheral mappings within which Spain and Portugal were placed in the early modern period positioned their colonial territories at “the periphery of a periphery.” Decolonial movements and theoretical discussions have critically revisited the concept of periphery and problematized the discussion with new terms such as Gloria Anzaldúa’s “nepantilism” (“being between crossroads”) and her post-binary discussion of mestizo/a identities. Following on the fruitful discussions of our inaugural conference at Reed College in the spring of 2016, our Second Conference of LALISA at the University of Oregon aims to investigate the validity and contemporary currency of the center-periphery model as a way to understand Latin American, Latino/a, and Iberian cultural productions and social formations. We expect to receive papers from various disciplines across the humanities and the social sciences that will deal with issues related to the central themes of the conference:

Center/periphery; Peripheral knowledges and identities; Colonial and postcolonial cartographies; Spatial identifications; Walls, borders, and the end of globalization; Eurocentrism, white supremacist geographies of exclusion; Environmental humanities; Global/local; Postcoloniality in the post-Hispanic world; Gender formations in the peripheries of modernity; Virtual borders, zones of influence, divisions; Regionalism and nationalism, postnationalism, and neonationalism; Space and the modern/premodern/postmodern debate; Latinidad/hispanidad/indigenismo; Enrique Dusell’s concepts “underside of modernity, Transmodernity”; Marginalization and economic oppression; Racial peripheries, racialized bodies and places; Transatlantic crossings, hemispheric displacements, migrations, diasporas.

Abstracts should include a full title, a 300-word description of the paper, and the institutional affiliation of the presenter. Papers will be accepted in Spanish, Portuguese, and English. Please direct your enquiries and abstract submissions to lalisa@uoregon.edu

Peripheral Mappings:

Social and Cultural Geographies from the Underside of Modernity

Deadline for receipt of abstracts is January 30th.

Confirmations and a full program will be made available in February. A selection of revised papers presented at the conference will be published in the new UO-based online journal Periphērica: Journal of Social, Cultural, and Literary History in 2017/18.

The conference fee ($50 for faculty, $25 for graduate students) will include light breakfast and lunches on Friday and Saturday; a conference dinner ($45) on Friday will be available for those wishing to attend. Presenters will need to be members of the LALISA association at lalisa.org in order to attend the conference and the business meeting on Saturday, April 15th.

 

December 7, 2016

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS- RL Scholarships

The Department of Romance Languages now accepting applications for RL scholarships!!!

RL scholarships are open to current UO undergraduate and graduate students in the Romance Languages Department. Undergraduate students must be declared majors or minors in the Romance Languages Department at the time of application. In order to receive a scholarship award you must be enrolled at the UO as a full time student during the 2017/2018 academic year.

The completed application is due in the Romance Languages Office by Monday, February 6th, 2017.

For more information please visit: rl.uoregon.edu/scholarships

June 22, 2016

Gould addresses RL majors at 2016 Commencement

EvlynSpeaking

The following is the 2016 Romance Languages commencement address, given by  Evlyn Gould, CAS Distinguished Professor in the Humanities and Professor Emerita of French

 

Buenos días y bienvenidos; bona tarde y bemvindos;

Buona sera i benvenuti; bonjour et bienvenues…. Let your minds travel with those sounds for just a moment….

These are the sounds of other lands, other faces and other places, other smells and others tastes… These are the sounds of the Romance Languages in which we shall confer degrees today.

I am Evlyn Gould, Professor Emerita of French and I am delighted to be the one to address you today at these commencement ceremonies for the Dept. of Romance languages honoring the graduating class of 2016. Give yourselves a round of applause.

Commencement ceremonies… I am thoughtful because after 33 years of teaching at the UO, I, too, am graduating. We do think of this event as the end, end of the term, of the year, of our formal studies. Indeed, as of today, gone are the finals, gone are the demanding professors, the deadlines, the all-nighters. But commencement is not about that. From the French commencement or Italian, cominciare, or Spanish, comenzar, today is a new beginning, with new horizons of possibility before you, new responsibilities and your own assignments and deadlines… to set for yourselves.

You are entering a world of networks, a world of continual communications and continual connection, a world of inters: Inter-disciplinarity, international markets, inter-ethnic conflicts, interactions of all sorts with long-distance migrants and immigrants, a world of environmental inter-dependence. As students with expertise in languages other than English, your reach through these networks is potentially extensive. You may find yourself making instantaneous translations for the other side of the world, (or slow and painful ones that anguish over just the right expression for that culturally specific foreign idea that you want to translate for people here in the US); you may travel to the other side of the world with regularity, or you may stay there awhile to improve living conditions, the soil, the housing or the crops in Uruguay, in Mexico, in Spain, in Chad, in Lampedusa, in Morocco or in Egypt. You may practice international law or work in international tourism. You may stay right here in the Pacific North West and still serve people on the other side of the world with a flick or a click of the hand. You may teach in multi-ethnic, multi-cultured schools, or you may teach Oregonians about these other communities; you may invest your time aiding transcriptions in hospitals, in banks, or in refugee centers, or you may simply invest your great earnings in the global market economy. However you deploy the learning and experience you have engaged over your years at UO, you will be GLOBAL CITIZENS.

What are global citizens? Let me say quickly that they are not the clichéd unit of speech designed to be mere fodder for political rhetoric, nor are they a way to designate the impersonality of transactions required by technology. Rather, according to a recent report on US education: global citizens are rarer than we might think for these are individuals—and I quote–who…. “are aware of the global nature of societal issues, care about people in distant places, understand the nature of global economic integration, appreciate the interconnectedness and interdependence of people, respect and protect cultural diversity, fight for social justice for all, and protect planet Earth—home for all human beings” (Zhao 2010).

The US has struggled with the goal of creating curricula designed to promote global citizenship because of a feeling of isolation, a century of international dominance, the perception that globalized themes are insurmountable and that many of the issues we face as ‘global citizens” remain controversial or just plan hard to talk about: how are our values shaped by location, by poverty or by wealth, by safety or war, or famine, by religion, by geographic displacement or by climate chaos? But where the US has fallen short, we in the Dept of Romance Languages excel! By studying second, third, or even fourth languages and their literatures at UO and by steeping in the rich cultures and lifestyles they have shaped, you have improved your ability to cross many of these social, geographic, economic, and cultural divides.

Today, with unprecedented speed, we are, as Gustave Flaubert wrote in the increasingly industrialized mid-19th century, “everywhere and nowhere at once.” And what are the tools that will be necessary for this (acceleration) and its constant demand to re-position your energies and intentions? Well…, this continual re-location requires a certain eco-location. … (and not because we’ll all be underwater…) Like our friends in the sea, to eco-locate is to perceive the sounds around us, to move in response to them, hear the melodies of languages, knowing that those melodies represent the souls of people. Ever more than technology, social networking across language barriers, and deep sensitivities to cultural and economic divides, to religious differences, to varied ethnicities (genders and values), and to the many-splendored ideas about what constitutes the good life… in this world of ours, these will be the skills central to everyday communication and to the preservation of our planet for the future.

Now a closing to word to parents and families and then to you graduates:

Parents and families, your investment has been a good one—in the future of your students and in our future. Students with liberal arts education who spend time in the company of other languages learn to feel different emotions, to rehearse different passions, to experience different sacred rituals and to hear the world in different ways. They may take longer to find their own satisfying niches in the working world, but research shows that they will be happier and live longer lives in the long run. Moreover, I might also point out that recent brain research has revealed that studying second and third languages increases brain plasticity. It actually has health benefits… It opens new pathways in the cerebral cortex and quickens the synapses making for better adaptation to the speeding world.

Students, join me now in thanking your parents and families for doing their best to outfit you for a world they cannot themselves yet imagine.

Graduates, … YOU are thinkers and readers. You have learned to discern, beneath the surfaces of texts, the voices and stories of other hearts yearning. You have learned to ask the big questions literature asks: about life, love, politics, death, and meaning. You are people poised to challenge the intoxications of immediate gratification, peoples poised in ethical responsiveness before an often unfair world, people who know how to listen and how to become silent so as to hear the Earth crying out. I have spoken with many of you. I know you have great ideas for using global advertising to improve the environment, for deploying new business strategies to improve lives, food and access, for publishing and speaking in new ways that diminish discrimination, and promote equanimity rather than promoting the fears of scarcity thinking. I for one am glad to have you on my team. I congratulate you heartily. May you take up your participation in a global citizenry in responsible and thoughtful ways and may you understand that your particular way of participating is absolutely essential to the whole. Thank you.

June 14, 2016

Commencement 2016!!!

RL Celebrates its graduates. Congratulations to the class of 2016!

The Romance Languages 2016 Commencement Ceremony took place on Monday, June 13th.  The event was a held outdoors in the EMU Amphitheater. Congratulations to all of the graduates!!  A special congratulations is order for the MA graduates (Elena Delgado Vazquez, Alizée Guillou, Marie Rodiet, Maureen Toussieux, Elizabeth Valdez, Javier Velasco) and RL newly minted Doctors, Alvaro Ares, Vania Diaz Romero Paz, Sandra Mefoude Obiono, Erin Moberg, Luz Romero Montano, Aara Zweifel.

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June 1, 2016

Public Lecture: Siskind. Wednesday, June 1, 5:30-7pm, Willamette Hall 110, “(De)provincializing World War I: Latin American Literature and the reshaping of global modernism”.

Cosmopolitan desires

Mariano Siskind is John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Humanities, from Harvard University (Department of Romance Languages and Comparative Literature). He has recently published _Cosmopolitan Desires. Latin American Literature and the Discourses of Globalization_ (Northwestern UP) which traces a genealogy of texts on universality and cosmopolitanism, a series of significant instances during the twentieth century when Latin American intellectuals conceptualized the possibility of a Latin American modernity not in terms of particularist affirmations of national or regional difference and specificity, but as a result of assuming a cosmopolitan identity that allowed them to inscribe themselves in the universal field of modernity, and to imagine themselves standing on equal footing with their Western European peers. He is currently working on the legacy of World War I in Latin America’s modernist writing and Global War and Modernism, and is coordinating a workshop on cosmopolitan intellectual genealogies in Latin America, along colleagues from Harvard and the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies.

April 29, 2016

Spring Film Series. Ayotzinapa: Crónica de un crimen de estado

May 4th, 2016 5:00 p.m. Straub 156

Film Viewing: Ayotzinapa: Crónica de un crimen de estado

Ayotzinapa: Chronicle of a Crime of State is the story of the forced disappearance of 43 student teachers, which exposes the criminal complicity between the police and military authorities, and the political and economic elite of Mexico. TRT 101 minutes.

April 26, 2016

Round Table Conversation and Public Presentation: David Scott (Columbia University)

Wednesday, April 27, “RL 623: Comparative Modernities”, co-taught by Cory Browning and Mayra Bottaro, will host Professor David Scott on our campus. His visit is part of the Annual RL 623 Speaker Series. We will have a Round Table Conversation with UO Faculty and graduate students from 3:30-5pm in Chapman Hall 202, and a public presentation “Michael Manley’s Styles of Radical Will” at 6-7:30pm in Lillis 112. We hope you can join us for one or both of these events!

Event co-sponsored by: Romance Languages Department, English Department, COLT, European Studies Program, Latin American Studies Program, College of Arts and Sciences, Oregon Humanities Center.

Professor David Scott’s work has been concerned with the reconceptualization of the way we think the story of the colonial past for the postcolonial present. His work has been highly influential in areas beyond the field of Anthropology. He is the author of Refashioning Futures (1999), Conscripts of Modernity (2004), Omens of Adversity (2014), and has recently completed a book called Stuart Hall’s Voice: Intimations of an Ethics of Receptive Generosity (based on his lectures at the University of the Western Cape, South Africa, in November-December 2013). He is currently working on a biography of Stuart Hall and on a study of the question of reparations for the historical injustice of New World slavery. He is the editor of Small Axe, and director of the Small Axe Project, which is involved in

April 14, 2016

Brazilian author Salgado Maranhão and his translator Alexis Levitin

Monday, April 18th, RL, LAS and Translation Studies will host Brazilian Poet Salgado Maranhão and translator Alexis Levitin on our campus. We will have a Brown Bag @ 12pm at the Mills International Center and a public bilingual reading/discussion at 4:30pm at the Browsing Room in the Knight Library. I hope you can join us for some of these event! Find below a short bio on both Salgado Maranhão and Alexis Levitin.
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Salgado Maranhão won the prestigious Prêmio Jabuti in 1999 with Mural of Winds. In 2011, The Color of the Word won the Brazilian Academy of Letters highest poetry award. In 2014, the Brazilian PEN Club chose his recent collection, Mapping the Tribe, as best book of poetry for the year. In 2015 the Brazilian Writers Union gave him first prize, again for The Color of the Word. His newest book is Opera of Nos, launching in September in Rio de Janeiro. In addition to ten books of poetry, he has written song lyrics and made recordings with some of Brazil’s leading jazz and pop musicians. His work has appeared in numerous magazines in the USA, including Bitter Oleander, BOMB, Cream City Review, Dirty Goat, Florida Review, Massachusetts Review, and Spoon River Poetry Review. Here in the USA, he is represented by two bilingual collections of poetry: Blood of the Sun (Milkweed Editions, 2012) and Tiger Fur (White Pine Press, 2015).
Alexis Levitin’s thirty-nine books of translation include Clarice Lispector’s Soulstorm and Eugenio de Andrade’s Forbidden Words, both from New Directions. Recent books include Salgado Maranhão’s Blood of the Sun (Milkweed Editions, 2012), Eugenio de Andrade’s The Art of Patience (Red Dragonfly Press, 2013), Ana Minga’s Tobacco Dogs (The Bitter Oleander Press, 2013), Santiago Vizcaino’s Destruction in the Afternoon (Diálogos Books, 2015), Sophia de Mello Breyner Andresen’s Exemplary Tales (Tagus Press, 2015) and Salgado Maranhão’s Tiger Fur (White Pine Press, 2015). In 2012, Levitin and Maranhao completed a three month reading tour of the USA, visiting over fifty colleges and other institutions. In tre spring of 2016, they will be reading from Blood of the Sun and Tiger Fur in the Northeast, the Midwest, and the West Coast.

February 11, 2016

Third Annual Symposium on Spanish as a Heritage Language (SSHL) at UO Feb 18-20

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