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March 25, 2017

Speak Spanish? Portuguese? Consider a Major or Minor in Latin American Studies

Investigate why Frida Kahlo’s paintings are so enduringly popular. Dive into the world of Latin American soccer. Separate fact from fiction in the biography of Ernesto “Che” Guevara. Sample popular dishes in countries across Latin America. The Latin American Studies Program offers an in-depth look at the richness and diversity of a vast area and its people. Whether pre–Columbian art, the striking wonder of the Amazon rainforest, or the history of colonialism tugs at your heartstrings, you’ll be forever changed by your newfound knowledge.

Take advantage of study abroad programs where you’ll travel to Costa Rica, Ecuador, Mexico, or other exciting places to sharpen your language skills and become familiar with new cultures. In Eugene, you can volunteer for a variety of organizations such as Centro Latino Americano, a local bilingual multicultural agency dedicated to helping the Latino community, or become politically active with the Latin American Solidarity Committee. UO students have also worked with the local school districts to mentor youth. Others have volunteered at Siempre Amigos, which provides health services to survivors of torture and political violence.

You’ll delve into politics, literature, science, ecology, and other engaging topics in courses such as Caribbean Migrants in the Literary Imagination or The Cold War in Latin America. Learn from top-notch scholars who offer encouragement in a supportive atmosphere.

Due to its inherently interdisciplinary training, our undergraduate major in Latin American Studies provides a thorough grounding in the languages, history, geography, and some of the central cultural and socio-economic issues at stake in the region. Career opportunities for students completing a degree in Latin American studies are available through such avenues as research centers, private foundations working in the area, international businesses, international nongovernmental organizations (including human-rights and environmental organizations), the Peace Corps, the United States Foreign Service, international aid programs, the United Nations and other international organizations.

January 9, 2017

LALISA Conference: April 13-15

Program for LALISA and Conference registration available here!

CALL FOR PAPERS: 2nd LALISA CONFERENCE: April 13-15 2017 (already closed)

From Catalonia to California, Cuba, Chile, to all the many areas impacted by the long Iberian expansion that started in the 15th century, the foundational divisions of center and periphery have constituted cultural and social spaces where languages, bodies, ethnicities, and alternate mappings have resisted colonial hegemonic practices and institutions. According to Mexican philosopher Leopoldo Zea (1912-2004) the peripheral mappings within which Spain and Portugal were placed in the early modern period positioned their colonial territories at “the periphery of a periphery.” Decolonial movements and theoretical discussions have critically revisited the concept of periphery and problematized the discussion with new terms such as Gloria Anzaldúa’s “nepantilism” (“being between crossroads”) and her post-binary discussion of mestizo/a identities. Following on the fruitful discussions of our inaugural conference at Reed College in the spring of 2016, our Second Conference of LALISA at the University of Oregon aims to investigate the validity and contemporary currency of the center-periphery model as a way to understand Latin American, Latino/a, and Iberian cultural productions and social formations. We expect to receive papers from various disciplines across the humanities and the social sciences that will deal with issues related to the central themes of the conference:

Center/periphery; Peripheral knowledges and identities; Colonial and postcolonial cartographies; Spatial identifications; Walls, borders, and the end of globalization; Eurocentrism, white supremacist geographies of exclusion; Environmental humanities; Global/local; Postcoloniality in the post-Hispanic world; Gender formations in the peripheries of modernity; Virtual borders, zones of influence, divisions; Regionalism and nationalism, postnationalism, and neonationalism; Space and the modern/premodern/postmodern debate; Latinidad/hispanidad/indigenismo; Enrique Dusell’s concepts “underside of modernity, Transmodernity”; Marginalization and economic oppression; Racial peripheries, racialized bodies and places; Transatlantic crossings, hemispheric displacements, migrations, diasporas.

Abstracts should include a full title, a 300-word description of the paper, and the institutional affiliation of the presenter. Papers will be accepted in Spanish, Portuguese, and English. Please direct your enquiries and abstract submissions to lalisa@uoregon.edu

Peripheral Mappings:

Social and Cultural Geographies from the Underside of Modernity

Deadline for receipt of abstracts is January 30th.

Confirmations and a full program will be made available in February. A selection of revised papers presented at the conference will be published in the new UO-based online journal Periphērica: Journal of Social, Cultural, and Literary History in 2017/18.

The conference fee ($50 for faculty, $25 for graduate students) will include light breakfast and lunches on Friday and Saturday; a conference dinner ($45) on Friday will be available for those wishing to attend. Presenters will need to be members of the LALISA association at lalisa.org in order to attend the conference and the business meeting on Saturday, April 15th.

 

Poetry takes Jesús Sepúlveda to South Africa

Sylt Foundation Invites Jesús Sepúlveda to South Africa

Chilean poet and senior instructor Jesús Sepúlveda just returned from a three-week writer’s residency in Johannesburg where he met South African writers, poets, and artists.

jesus-bila

Renowned poet Vonani Bila and Jesús Sepúlveda

Sponsored by the Sylt Foundation, Sepúlveda visited renowned poet Vonani Bila and his wife Gudani Ramikosi, an author of children’s books, at the Timbila Writers’ Village in the Northeastern province of Limpopo. Bila completed in 2016—in collaboration with poet Max Makisi Marhanele—the edition of the first comprehensive monolingual Xitsonga dictionary, Tihlungu ta Rixaka. Xitsonga is one of the ten vernacular languages in South Africa and the 920-page dictionary represents a great recognition of the importance of South African native languages. Sepúlveda will donate his personal copy to the UO library, so the dictionary can be available in the Pacific Northwest library system.

While in Johannesburg—also known as Joburg or Jozi, the two most common abbreviations for this city, the largest one in South Africa—Sepúlveda met with Aragorn Eloff, a member of the bolo’bolo collective and responsible for the publication of his book The Garden of Peculiarities reprinted in Cape Town in 2016. On the occasion of Sepúlveda’s visit to South Africa, Eloff published an interview, “A Mockingbird in the Garden,” in the online publication Medium on December 15, 2016.

 

Sepúlveda and kids from the Elim

Sepúlveda and kids from the Elim

Indra Wussow, art critic and collector, translator, writer and director of the Sylt Foundation, organized several literary tertulias to connect Sepúlveda with local writers and poets such as Xoli Norman, Charl-Pierre Naudé, Phillippa Yaa de Viliers as well as pianist Jill Richards and painter Jaco van Schalkwyk. Wussow also organized visits to sites of cultural, historical, and political interest. Tumi Mokgope, project manager of the Sylt Foundation, guided Sepúlveda through these sites: the Township of Soweto, home of Nelson Mandela and Desmond Tutu where the uprising of 1976 triggered the social movement that ended apartheid in 1990; the Cradle of Humankind and the Sterkfontein Caves in the outskirts of Johannesburg, where the finds of ancient hominin fossils are exhibited. Sepúlveda also visited the Apartheid Museum in Joburg and the Freedom Park Museum in Pretoria to learn about the systematic and hideous regime of racial segregation installed in the country from 1948 to 1990.

During his stay, Sepúlveda also met with writers Zaide Harneker and Frank Meintjies, active members of the South African literary and political milieu, and discussed the development of the Abantu Book Festival, activism in Johannesburg, and the social and educational crisis in the country, with a 26.6% unemployment rate in 2016. Sepúlveda also discussed the current situation with Angie Kapelianis, broadcast journalist of SABC National Radio, who has been covering political news since Mandela’s presidential election in 1994.

While writing about the Soweto uprising, Sepúlveda found intriguing similarities between Chile and South Africa. “I was surprised to realize how close the recent political history of both countries are. Chile and South Africa ended their cruel regimes through massive demonstrations and civil disobedience at the end of the 1980’s, while transitioning toward modern, stable and yet neoliberal democracies. Rampant neoliberalism produces abyssal social gap and class segregation, which is the cause of huge problems in both countries. Another similarity is the nature of the extractive economies based on mine exploitation—with its negative ecological impact on the natural environment and people’s health. Another parallel is how South Africa and Chile have become in the last decade magnetic poles that attract economic immigration. While Chile has the fastest growing immigrant population in South America, receiving people from neighbor countries as well as from Colombia, Haiti, and Spain; South Africa is the second African country after Ivory Coast to receive people, making the immigrant population 4% of the total inhabitants in the country. After this residency, I have learned a great deal about South Africa, helping me to reflect with a wider perspective on Chile as well as the US, and reaffirming my conviction to honor linguistic diversity and cultural differences as the only way to build up tolerant societies for a harmonious world. I’m extremely grateful to the Sylt Foundation and Indra Wussow for this great opportunity.”

jesus-norman

Xoli Norman

Indra Wussow

Indra Wussow

February 11, 2016

Third Annual Symposium on Spanish as a Heritage Language (SSHL) at UO Feb 18-20

January 19, 2016

Jesús Sepúlveda reads at International Festival in Bali, Indonesia

Chilean poet Jesús Sepúlveda and Balinese poet Samar Gantang

Chilean poet Jesús Sepúlveda and Balinese poet Samar Gantang

Between November 26th and December 1st 2015, ten poets were invited to participate in the Tabanan International Poetry Festival in Bali, Indonesia. Poet and Senior Instructor of Spanish Composition, Creative Writing and Poetry, Jesús Sepúlveda, was one of them. During the festival poets from four continents met and discussed issues related to poetry and their distinctive poetic traditions while performing poetry readings in their original languages with simultaneous translation into Indonesian for a Balinese audience composed of community members, students, poets, and occasional passers-by.

The Grand Opening of the event consisted in a procession through the streets of Denpasar—Bali’s capital—where poets paraded, carrying a banner with the pictures of all poets. A band that played Gamelan Balinese traditional music accompanied the poets while police stopped traffic and escorted the group of poets and musicians to the main stage. People assembled on sidewalks cheering the poets while giant posters announcing the festival were hanging from buildings and homes. At the end of the day, German poet Michael Augustin wrote: “poetry can stop cars!”

Sepúlveda had the opportunity to meet renowned Javanese poet and feminist scholar, Toedi Heraty, who invited the group to celebrate her 82th birthday at one of her beautiful homes. He also met the national Balinese poet and shaman, Samar Gantang, whose epic poems are rooted in Balinese culture and are performed with Gamelan music and masked dancers interpreting the different characters and scenes of the poems. This style of performative poetry is already a poetic school in Bali and Samar Gantang’s reputation is vibrant and emulated by Balinese youth.

Poets Muhammad Salleh, Vonani Bila, Aurélia Lassaque, Jesús Sepúlveda, and Michael Augustin

Poets Muhammad Salleh, Vonani Bila, Aurélia Lassaque, Jesús Sepúlveda, and Michael Augustin

Another highlight of the week was the poetry readings at the 16th century Tanah Lot Temple in the Wantilan area. Once there, and before the reading and the spectacular sunset over the Indian Ocean, poets were asked to sign their names on separate plaques, so they could be engraved in a holy rock placed in the garden of the Hindu temple. Organizers and authorities envisioned this tribute as an opportunity for future visitors to admire the calligraphy of poet’s signatures melted into the beauty of the landscape and the sacred atmosphere of the place.

During the festival poets also visited schools, experienced Balinese culture and cuisine, and trekked the rice paddies of beautiful, utopian, and green land surrounding Jatiluwih village in the plateau of Watukaru Mount—one of the most iconic and traditional areas in Bali.   In this excursion, poets learned about the ecologically sustainable irrigation system of canals and weirs called Subak that dates back to the 9th century while drinking red rice tea and eating fresh fruit from the organic gardens.

Poets also taught and learned from each other, expanding their expertise and poetic craft while creating an international network of poetry. Malaysian poet Muhammad Salleh shared with his fellow poets the tradition of Pantun—a Malay literary form from 15th century—while Indian poet Sujata Bhatt read her intimate poetry about her displacements and reminiscences of her mother tongue. Mozambique-born poet and professor Lucas Mkuti presented an anthology of poetry from around the world Sweep of the Violin, whose title comes from a poem by Javanese poet and festival organizer, Dorothea Rosa Herliany. The whole group traveled throughout the island in a van driven “Balinese style,” visiting cultural sites and talking in Balinese, Indonesian, Malay, English, German, French, Portuguese, Italian, and Spanish.

Poet Jesús Sepúlveda reading at the Tabanan main square

Poet Jesús Sepúlveda reading at the Tabanan main square

On the last night, five poets read their work at the main Tabanan plaza, Alit Saputra, in front of 15,000 people in the context of the city’s celebration of its 522 years. South African poet Vonani Bila, German poet Bastian Boettcher, French poet Aurélia Lassaque, Balinese poet Samar Gantang, and Chilean poet Jesús Sepúlveda read their poetry on the main stage, while a giant screen showed their readings to the public and the cameras televised the event live on Indonesian national TV.   This was certainly a climactic ending to the festival, which remained in the national and local news even days after poets returned home.

For more information, see tabananpoetry.com or google Tabanan International Poetry Festival.

November 3, 2015

UO Spanish Heritage Language Program featured in KUNP Destino Éxito segment

Since October of 2013 the UO Office of Enrollment Management has partnered with KUNP Univision Portland and MundoFox on a national effort to increase college attendance, retention and graduation by the Latino community. The initiative, Destino Exito, features in its most recent video two U of O students, Perla Alvarez and Gildardo E. Corona, who have both been participants in our Romance Languages SHL (Spanish Heritage Language) Program. The short video, which you can watch here, includes footage of the First Annual SHL Spring Convivio event, which took place on May 19th in the Many Nations Longhouse. As you can see in the segment, faculty and students enjoyed homemade tostadas prepared by our very own SHL Director, Profesora Claudia Holguin, ensalada de nopales, and tinga de pollo, among other delights, to the sounds of the Andean Music Ensemble (MUS 410), directed by Professor Juan Eduardo Wolf. After dinner, Profesora Holguín along with Amy Costales, Advisor for the SHL Program, presented graduating seniors with certificates acknowledging their participation in and dedication to SHL UO.

October 31, 2015

Outbreak / Breakout Graduate Symposium

The Graduate Students at RL have organized their biannual Symposium around the concepts of “Outbreak” and “Breakout”. Please join us November 13th and 14th for a series of panels, talks, and activities that will engage researchers and the community with cultural representations of outbreaks and breakouts in the many societies that speak a Romance Language.

October 11, 2015

Study abroad program in Chiapas

A new study abroad program in Chiapas, Mexico is coming to the UO this summer. You can find out more at two events this week:

Another World is Possible: Service Learning and Intercultural Engagement Across Communities in Chiapas Tuesday October 13, 4:00 to 5:00 pm Friendly 214 Instituto de Lenguas Jovel Director Helga Loebell and Faculty Advisor Analisa Taylor give a sneak peek of the new UO Chiapas Program’s model of academic and public engagement through service learning, sharing with students and faculty how this program creates safe and socially responsible research and internship opportunities that benefit students as well as in-country organizations and communities. Refreshments provided.
Mayan Communities and Social Justice in Chiapas: Summer 2016 Program Open House for Students Wednesday October 14, 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm Volcanology 101 Join Program Director Helga Loebell and Faculty Advisor Analisa Taylor for an afternoon snack and virtual tour of the Chiapas Program that will take place in San Cristóbal de las Casas, Mexico July 17 to September 3, 2016. We’ll give you details on scholarships, courses, prerequisites, home stays, internship opportunities, planned adventures, and more. Refreshments provided.
Both events are free and open to the public. Sponsored by the Department of Romance Languages, the Office of International Affairs and the UO Global Justice Program.
Program Details:
This 7-week program offers you the opportunity to earn twelve upper division credits in Spanish through courses on Indigenous History and Culture in Chiapas, Mesoamerican Foodways, and Academic and Public Engagement across Communities. UO participants team up with Mexican youth to design and implement hands-on social, environmental, or cultural projects oriented toward your mutual interests. Excursions in and around San Cristóbal draw on the knowledge of local experts in fields such as Mayan History, Art, and Culture, Human Rights, Food Justice, and Environmental Education to create a holistic program of cultural and academic discovery.

With a population of approximately 200,000 people, San Cristóbal de las Casas is one of the oldest colonial cities in the Americas, and has been a center of Maya civilization for thousands of years before that. Highland Maya culture, crisp mountain air, and a cluster of internationally renowned universities, research institutes, and non-profit grassroots organizations make this quaint big city a magnet for curious idealists from all over the world and a cozy perch from which to explore the archaeological, natural, and cultural wonders of Southern Mexico and the Yucatán Peninsula.

Operating continuously since 1993, the Instituto de Lenguas Jovel is unmatched in Chiapas for its academic quality and reputation for social responsibility in working with community partners. The Instituto Jovel offers courses in Spanish, German, English, Tzotzil and Tzeltal, as well as cultural programming and workshops, making it a multicultural haven that echoes the provincial charm and international pulse of San Cristóbal. Instructors build museum tours and around-town exploration into their curricula, and Helga Loebell coordinates language exchanges, dance lessons, and cooking classes. Excellent yoga, dance, and martial arts studios are all within a few blocks of the school and students’ home stays.

See here Chiapas Instituto de Lenguas Jovelfor a quick tour of the school and its setting in San Cristóbal. Please contact Professor Analisa Taylor at Analisa@uoregon.edu or Rick Batchelor at
rbatche2@uoregon.edu for more information.

Program Dates: July 17-Sept 3, 2016

Application Deadline: March 1, 2016

October 10, 2015

Enrique Chagoya Artist Talk: Cannibal Palimpsest

Thursday, October 15 at 6:00pm
Lawrence Hall, 115
Painter and printmaker Enrique Chagoya whose provocative works incorporate diverse symbolic elements from pre-Columbian mythology, Western religious iconography, and American popular culture, leads an artist’s talk in conjunction with his JSMA exhibition Adventures of Modernist Cannibals.

This exhibition and its related programs are made possible by the generous support of Jordan D. Schnitzer and his Family Foundation, the Department of Art and the Center for Latino/a & Latin American Studies.
Of particular interest for our heritage speakers of Spanish as well as for those interested in interlingual literary creation, bilingualism, and Spanglish is his illustration of the Guillermo Gómez Peña’s Codex Espangliensis http://scholar.library.miami.edu/1492books/codex.html

Amalia Gladhart on Translation (Rosario, Argentina)

Professor Amalia Gladhart spoke to faculty and students in the translation program at the Instituto Superior “San Bartolomé” in Rosario, Argentina, on September 29, 2015. Addressing the group on the eve of International Translators’ Day, Gladhart’s lecture was titled “Consideraciones contextuales a la hora de traducir: Reflexiones desde la práctica.” The talk drew on work-in-progress in both translation (a translation of Angélica Gorodischer’s novel Tumba de jaguares) and translation studies, asking what it means to translate context–a seeming impossibility that translators must creatively resolve in each project. Discussion following the talk was lively, a reflection of the strong preparation the students have received in diverse aspects of translation.

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