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May 1, 2018

Thinking Authenticity Series: Sánchez Prado

Wednesday, May 2: Professor Ignacio Sánchez Prado
Title: “The Invention of ‘Authentic’ Mexican Food: Rick Bayless, Diana Kennedy, Enrique Olvera”
3-5 pm, Knight Browsing Room

Ignacio Sanchez Prado is Professor of Spanish, Latin American Studies, and Film and Media Studies at Washington University in St. Louis, and one of the most influential scholars of Mexican culture and Latin American intellectual history. Sanchez Prado’s research spans a wide range of areas including neoliberal culture, world literature theory, food studies and cosmopolitanism. Based on his recent work on the circulation of Latin American cultural production both within and outside Latin America, his lecture will focus on the relation between authenticity, ethnic cuisines and neoliberalism through three case studies: Diane Kennedy, Rick Bayless and Enrique Olvera.

Free and open to the public

Co-organizers:
Fabienne Moore (
fmoore@uoregon.edu) & Sergio Rigoletto (srigolet@uoregon.edu)

Solalinde – Annual Las Casas Lecture on Human Rights

The 2018 Annual Las Casas Lecture on Human Rights Thursday May 3rd 5:30-7:00 p.m. in PLC180.

This year’s speaker is Mexican priest Father Alejandro Solalinde, a candidate to the Nobel Peace Prize in 2017 and a tireless fighter for migrant rights in Mexico. He is the founder of the network of shelters hermanosenelcamino.org and has been the target of death threats, harassment, as well as institutional ostracism from both church and state in Mexico. His talk The Migrant’s Path/El camino del migrants will address the ongoing humanitarian crisis of Central American refugees who cross through Mexico on their way North to the US and who become victimized by both narcos and police forces intent on charging a hefty “fee” for their passage in the form of money, but very often, psychological and physical abuse, rape, torture and in many cases death and disappearance. 

Solalinde-1dsd08r

April 2, 2018

García-Caro Contributes to Cambridge History of Latina/o American Literature

Pedro Garcia-Caro has recently published a book chapter entitled “Performing to a Captive Audience: Dramatic Encounters in the Borderlands of Empire.” The Cambridge History of Latina/o American Literature edited by John Morán González and Laura Lomas. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018. 51-73. 
In his chapter García-Caro contours different practices of cultural performance by Spanish conquistadors and settlers in areas that would go on to become part of the US throughout the nineteenth century. From the early military campaigns and displays of religious and military power staging the colonial “claim” to the land through the “Requerimiento” in the sixteenth century, the staging of miracles and dance-dramas, through to satirical drama in the eighteenth century, public performance underlines the formation of cultural captivity of the colonized indigenous others, while increasingly revealing the divide and competition between religious and secular cultural agendas in the Spanish-speaking colonial space. García-Caro offers a comprehensive survey of the configuration of cultural hegemonies around public performance which relegated indigenous agency and cultural legitimacy to the role of spectator of incoming imperial narratives. Drawing from his recent research on the first Californio secular play Astucias por heredar, and contextualizing the long history of Hispanic colonial presence in the North American continent, García-Caro proposes an original framework to consider the relation of colonial cultural production as constantly tied to the objective of control, acculturation, and domination.
March 6, 2018

Middlebrook on Why Read Don Quijote?

In February, Leah Middlebrook spoke at a panel on Why Read Don Quijote Now? as part of the U.C. Berkeley Designated Emphasis on Renaissance and Early Modern Studies’ series “Why Read…?” Her short talk, titled “Knight + Duenna as a Way of Life,” took a twenty-first century look at the theme of friendship in the novel.

CLLAS Symposium

Justice Across Borders: Gender, Race, and Migration in the Americas

March 8, 2018
Knight Library, Browsing Room, 1501 Kincaid St.
Gerlinger Lounge, 1468 University St.
Free & open to the public

Our thematic line of inquiry this year: America, Bridge Between Oceans poses the following questions: What happens when we put the Atlantic world in conversation with the Pacific? What kind of art and cultural production emerges? Which stories of struggles for racial, economic, gender and environmental justice arise? How does looking at Latinx and Latin American Studies from within the Pacific Rim region open up innovative and necessary methodological and analytical horizons? These questions also inspire our symposium Justice Across Borders: Gender, Race, and Migration in the Americas.

Fostering conversations about race, ethnicity, diasporas, gender, sexuality, migration, environmental justice, and culture that bridge the Atlantic and Pacific world, the symposium Justice Across Borders: Gender, Race, and Migration in the Americas explores what kind of new knowledges, art, social transformations, and activism we can create together in the face of increasing inequalities and social violence across the continent. We meditate on what contributions emerge from Pacific Rim-based research, art, advocacy work, and political movements when we put ourselves in conversation with scholars, artists, and activists based in the Atlantic coast.  We will discuss the increasing visibility of Caribbean migrants in the Pacific Northwest, environmental justice issues in Mexico, the U.S., Puerto Rico and the Southern Cone, archipelagic studies that encompass Caribbean and Pacific islands, gender politics within Latin American and Latinx communities in Oregon, experiences of Latin Americans alongside Pacific Islanders in the Pacific Rim region, queer Latina and AfroLatin@ art, indigeneity, blackness and Jewish diasporas in Latin America, challenges faced by a variety of Latinx communities in the U.S., etc. From a Latinx and Latin American Studies perspective, we engage comparative and relational dialogues with fields such as Pacific Islander Studies, Asian and Asian American Studies, Black Studies, Native American Studies, among others, hoping to bring new light into the epistemic possibilities of our fields and the meaning of Justice for all of us.

Symposium organizer: Alaí Reyes-Santos

Full list of affiliations

9:00 – 9:15 AM (Browsing Room)
Welcome from UO administration officials, CLLAS director, symposium coordinator.

9:20-10:30 AM (Browsing Room)
Race, Ethnicity and Diasporas
Rocio ZambranaLanie Millar, Roberto Arroyo
Chair: Marta Maldonado

10:40-11:50 AM (Browsing Room)
Women and Gender in Latin America and U.S. Latinx communities
Vicky Falcon, Michelle McKinleyKristin YarrisLynn StephenGabriela Martinez
Chair: Vicky Falcon,  Instituto de Cultura Oregoniana

12:00- 1:00 PM (Gerlinger Alumni Lounge)
Keynote Speaker/Lunch

“New Directions in Latinx and Latin American Studies: Archipelagos Across the Caribbean and the Pacific”
Guest: Yolanda Martinez-San Miguel
Chair: Rocio Zambrana and Lanie Millar

2:00-3:00 PM (Browsing Room)
Environmental Justice in the Americas
Judith Vega; David VazquezSarah WaldAnalisa TaylorPedro Garcia-Caro
Chair: David Vazquez

3:10 – 4:30 PM Roundtable (Browsing Room)
“Art, Migration, and Political Activism: Caribbean and Pacific Islander Migrants in the Pacific”
[SPONSORS: Department of Ethnic Studies, the Wayne Morse Center for Law & Politics, and the Center for Asia and Pacific Studies (CAPS)]
Panelists:  Judith Sierra-Rivera; JoAnna Poblete; Philipp Carrasco, Oregon AFL-CIO; Ileana Rodriguez Silva; Joyce Pualani Warren; and Jannes Martinez, Iyalocha, Lukumi priestess
Chair: Alaí Reyes-Santos

4:40PM – 5:40 PM  Plenary Session (Browsing Room)
“Latinx Communities: Questions, Challenges, and Transformations”
Monica Rojas, Director, Movimiento AfroLatino de Seattle; Laura Pulido; Ramona Hernández; Edwin Melendez, Director, Center for Puerto Rican Studies
Chair: Gerardo Sandoval

6:00 PM – 7:30 PM (Gerlinger Alumni Lounge)
RiffiandoDominican Artists in the House! A Talk/Reading/Performance
Josefina BaezAna-Maurine Lara, and Ernesto Lara
Coordinator: Ana-Maurine Lara

Light Dinner/Reception

Sponsored by the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS); Wayne Morse Center for Law & Politics; UO College of Arts and Sciences; The Office of the Provost; Center for the Study of Women in Society (CSWS); Latin American Studies program; Department of English; Department of Romance Languages; Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; Department of Anthropology; School of Journalism and Communication; Department of Philosophy; the Center for Asia and Pacific Studies (CAPS); the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA); Department of Ethnic Studies; Global Studies Institute, and the Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides (NCAP).

November 21, 2017

Chile in Conversation: Lectura de Poesía – Poetry Reading

Jesús Sepúlveda reads from his most recent poetry book Espejo de detalles. November 21, 4:30-6:00 – Mills International Lounge (EMU). 

Latin American Studies Book Presentation Series: Chile in Conversation.

October 19, 2017

Toño Martorell, Puerto Rican Artist Visits UO

Conversation (Q/A) with Puerto Rican artist Antonio Martorell on OCT 19 from 12pm-1:30pm at Crater Lake North EMU 146.

Please, sign up for this conversation (Q/A) by sending Cecilia Enjuto Rangel an email at enjuto@uoregon.edu. There is a limited space in this event and we want to know how many students, faculty members and members of the community are able to attend. Everyone is invited, please spread the word.

We also want to invite you attend his public lecture (free and open to everyone):

“Communication, Communion, and Confrontation in

Puerto Rican Art” by Antonio Martorell, Puerto Rican artist at

JSMA

Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

Ford Lecture Hall

THURSDAY | OCTOBER 19 | 4 PM

Sponsored by: Teaching Engagement Program:

Community Engagement Grant

Co-Sponsored by: Oregon Humanities Center, Latin

American Studies, Division of Equity and Inclusion,

Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, Romance Languages,

and Center for Latino/a & Latin American Studies.

Antonio Martorell is a visting artist at Linfield College. His exhibition,

“Rain/Lluvia” can be seen at the Linfield Art Gallery, opening October 16 and

continuing through November 18. It is his first exhibition in the Pacific NW.

September 19, 2017

Sept 26-27: Chilean poet, Raúl ZURITA at UO

RAÚL ZURITA (1950) is one of Latin America’s most celebrated poets. His works include Purgatorio (1979), Anteparaíso (1982), Canto a su amor desaparecido (1985), La Vida Nueva (1994), INRI (2003) and Zurita (2011). Through his writings, Zurita chronicles the violent history of Chile’s military dictatorship as well as that of the Americas since the conquest. In 1979, along with other artists, he founded CADA, Colectivo de Acciones de Arte, an art action group dedicated to the creation of political art that would resist the military regime. In 1982, he composed a poem in the sky over New York, and in 1993 he bulldozed “ni pena ni miedo” (no pain no fear) into the coarse sands of the Desert of Atacama. Due to its dimensions, this line is only visible from the sky. Zurita was awarded the Chilean National Prize of Literature and a scholarship from the Guggenheim Foundation. He has been conferred two Doctor honoris causa degrees and is Professor emeritus at the Universidad Diego Portales.

 

Lunch Brown Bag Conversation in Spanish with the Poet

TUESDAY SEPT 26 at 12:00pm to 1:30am
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Lease Crutcher Lewis Room 023
1395 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403

POETRY Reading (in SPANISH)
WEDNESDAY SEPT 27 4pm-5:30pm
Browsing Room, Knight Library
(Q/A in Spanish and English)

The generous support of the College of Arts and Sciences Program Grant, the Oregon Humanities Center, the Translation Studies Working Group, Romance Languages, Comparative Literature, Latin American Studies, and the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS) makes this event possible. These events are free and open to the public.

 

Contact Prof. Cecilia Enjuto Rangel (enjuto@uoregon.edu) for a reservatiofor the Q/A session. We will meet at noon, so if you want to bring a brown bag lunch, you can.

March 25, 2017

Speak Spanish? Portuguese? Consider a Major or Minor in Latin American Studies

Investigate why Frida Kahlo’s paintings are so enduringly popular. Dive into the world of Latin American soccer. Separate fact from fiction in the biography of Ernesto “Che” Guevara. Sample popular dishes in countries across Latin America. The Latin American Studies Program offers an in-depth look at the richness and diversity of a vast area and its people. Whether pre–Columbian art, the striking wonder of the Amazon rainforest, or the history of colonialism tugs at your heartstrings, you’ll be forever changed by your newfound knowledge.

Take advantage of study abroad programs where you’ll travel to Costa Rica, Ecuador, Mexico, or other exciting places to sharpen your language skills and become familiar with new cultures. In Eugene, you can volunteer for a variety of organizations such as Centro Latino Americano, a local bilingual multicultural agency dedicated to helping the Latino community, or become politically active with the Latin American Solidarity Committee. UO students have also worked with the local school districts to mentor youth. Others have volunteered at Siempre Amigos, which provides health services to survivors of torture and political violence.

You’ll delve into politics, literature, science, ecology, and other engaging topics in courses such as Caribbean Migrants in the Literary Imagination or The Cold War in Latin America. Learn from top-notch scholars who offer encouragement in a supportive atmosphere.

Due to its inherently interdisciplinary training, our undergraduate major in Latin American Studies provides a thorough grounding in the languages, history, geography, and some of the central cultural and socio-economic issues at stake in the region. Career opportunities for students completing a degree in Latin American studies are available through such avenues as research centers, private foundations working in the area, international businesses, international nongovernmental organizations (including human-rights and environmental organizations), the Peace Corps, the United States Foreign Service, international aid programs, the United Nations and other international organizations.

January 9, 2017

LALISA Conference: April 13-15

Program for LALISA and Conference registration available here!

CALL FOR PAPERS: 2nd LALISA CONFERENCE: April 13-15 2017 (already closed)

From Catalonia to California, Cuba, Chile, to all the many areas impacted by the long Iberian expansion that started in the 15th century, the foundational divisions of center and periphery have constituted cultural and social spaces where languages, bodies, ethnicities, and alternate mappings have resisted colonial hegemonic practices and institutions. According to Mexican philosopher Leopoldo Zea (1912-2004) the peripheral mappings within which Spain and Portugal were placed in the early modern period positioned their colonial territories at “the periphery of a periphery.” Decolonial movements and theoretical discussions have critically revisited the concept of periphery and problematized the discussion with new terms such as Gloria Anzaldúa’s “nepantilism” (“being between crossroads”) and her post-binary discussion of mestizo/a identities. Following on the fruitful discussions of our inaugural conference at Reed College in the spring of 2016, our Second Conference of LALISA at the University of Oregon aims to investigate the validity and contemporary currency of the center-periphery model as a way to understand Latin American, Latino/a, and Iberian cultural productions and social formations. We expect to receive papers from various disciplines across the humanities and the social sciences that will deal with issues related to the central themes of the conference:

Center/periphery; Peripheral knowledges and identities; Colonial and postcolonial cartographies; Spatial identifications; Walls, borders, and the end of globalization; Eurocentrism, white supremacist geographies of exclusion; Environmental humanities; Global/local; Postcoloniality in the post-Hispanic world; Gender formations in the peripheries of modernity; Virtual borders, zones of influence, divisions; Regionalism and nationalism, postnationalism, and neonationalism; Space and the modern/premodern/postmodern debate; Latinidad/hispanidad/indigenismo; Enrique Dusell’s concepts “underside of modernity, Transmodernity”; Marginalization and economic oppression; Racial peripheries, racialized bodies and places; Transatlantic crossings, hemispheric displacements, migrations, diasporas.

Abstracts should include a full title, a 300-word description of the paper, and the institutional affiliation of the presenter. Papers will be accepted in Spanish, Portuguese, and English. Please direct your enquiries and abstract submissions to lalisa@uoregon.edu

Peripheral Mappings:

Social and Cultural Geographies from the Underside of Modernity

Deadline for receipt of abstracts is January 30th.

Confirmations and a full program will be made available in February. A selection of revised papers presented at the conference will be published in the new UO-based online journal Periphērica: Journal of Social, Cultural, and Literary History in 2017/18.

The conference fee ($50 for faculty, $25 for graduate students) will include light breakfast and lunches on Friday and Saturday; a conference dinner ($45) on Friday will be available for those wishing to attend. Presenters will need to be members of the LALISA association at lalisa.org in order to attend the conference and the business meeting on Saturday, April 15th.

 

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